Kevon  Krajcik

Kevon Krajcik

1672848180

Array Pop(), Push(), Shift() and Unshift() Methods in Javascript

In this Javascript tutorial we will learn about Array Pop(), Push(), Shift() and Unshift() Methods in Javascript. Javascript have a rich set of inbuilt methods to perform a different type of operations with its String and Arrays. Today in this article, We will see the example of the few very common Array methods Push, Pop, Shift, Unshift. 

We will try to understand these Array methods with examples below. You can use the browser console to run these examples at your end.

JavaScript Array push() Method

The array push() method adds the new items to the end of an array and returns a new length. The new item(s) will be added at the end of an array. 

If you want to add a new item at the very beginning of the Array, then unshift() is used for it.

Let's see the example below:

Add a single item to an Array

let fruits = ['Mango','Banana','Apple'];
 
fruits.push('Orange');
console.log(fruits); // output will be["Mango", "Banana", "Apple", "Orange"]

Add multiple items to an array

let fruits = ['Mango','Banana','Apple'];
 
fruits.push('Orange','Guava');
console.log(fruits); // output will be["Mango", "Banana", "Apple", "Orange","Guava"]

Add Object to an Array of object

let countries = [
{ name:"England", language:"English" },
{ name:"Bangladesh", language:"Bangla" },
{ name:"Iran", language:"Urdu" }
];
 
countries.push({type: "India", language: "Hindi"});
console.log(countries);
// Below is the output
//(4) [
//0: {name: "England", language: "English"}
//1: {name: "Bangladesh", language: "Bangla"}
//2: {name: "Iran", language: "Urdu"}
//3: {type: "India", language: "Hindi"}
//]

JavaScript Array pop() Method

This method removes the item of the very last position of the array and returns that item. This method changes the length of the array.

When pop() applies on an empty array, undefined is returned.

let fruits = ["Banana", "Orange", "Apple", "Mango"];
fruits.pop(); // output is: "Mango"
let countries = [
{ name:"England", language:"English" },
{ name:"Bangladesh", language:"Bangla" },
{ name:"Iran", language:"Urdu" },
{ name:"India", language:"Hindi" }
];
 
let removedItem = countries.pop();
console.log(countries);
console.log("removed Item", removedItem);
// Below are the output...
// [{name: "England", language: "English"}1: {name: "Bangladesh", language: "Bangla"}2: {name: "Iran", language: "Urdu"}]
// removed Item {name: "India", language: "Hindi"}

JavaScript Array unshift() Method

The unshift() method adds a new item to the beginning of an array and returns the new length.

let countries = [
{ name:"England", language:"English" },
{ name:"Bangladesh", language:"Bangla" },
{ name:"Iran", language:"Urdu" }
];
 
countries.unshift({ name:"India", language:"Hindi" }); // if we console this line then new length will be printed.
console.log(countries);
// Below is the output
//[
//0: {name: "India", language: "Hindi"}
//1: {name: "England", language: "English"}
//2: {name: "Bangladesh", language: "Bangla"}
//3: {name: "Iran", language: "Urdu"}
//]

JavaScript Array shift() Method

This method removes the first element of the Array. It also changes the length of the Array. 

 
let countries = [
{ name:"England", language:"English" },
{ name:"Bangladesh", language:"Bangla" },
{ name:"Iran", language:"Urdu" }
];
 
countries.shift(); // if we console this line then the removed item will be printed
console.log(countries);
// Below is the output
//(2) [
//0: {name: "Bangladesh", language: "Bangla"}
//1: {name: "Iran", language: "Urdu"}
//]

Original article sourced at: https://jsonworld.com

#javascript 

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Array Pop(), Push(), Shift() and Unshift() Methods in Javascript

How to Create Arrays in Python

In this tutorial, you'll know the basics of how to create arrays in Python using the array module. Learn how to use Python arrays. You'll see how to define them and the different methods commonly used for performing operations on them.

This tutorialvideo on 'Arrays in Python' will help you establish a strong hold on all the fundamentals in python programming language. Below are the topics covered in this video:  
1:15 What is an array?
2:53 Is python list same as an array?
3:48  How to create arrays in python?
7:19 Accessing array elements
9:59 Basic array operations
        - 10:33  Finding the length of an array
        - 11:44  Adding Elements
        - 15:06  Removing elements
        - 18:32  Array concatenation
       - 20:59  Slicing
       - 23:26  Looping  


Python Array Tutorial – Define, Index, Methods

In this article, you'll learn how to use Python arrays. You'll see how to define them and the different methods commonly used for performing operations on them.

The artcile covers arrays that you create by importing the array module. We won't cover NumPy arrays here.

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction to Arrays
    1. The differences between Lists and Arrays
    2. When to use arrays
  2. How to use arrays
    1. Define arrays
    2. Find the length of arrays
    3. Array indexing
    4. Search through arrays
    5. Loop through arrays
    6. Slice an array
  3. Array methods for performing operations
    1. Change an existing value
    2. Add a new value
    3. Remove a value
  4. Conclusion

Let's get started!

What are Python Arrays?

Arrays are a fundamental data structure, and an important part of most programming languages. In Python, they are containers which are able to store more than one item at the same time.

Specifically, they are an ordered collection of elements with every value being of the same data type. That is the most important thing to remember about Python arrays - the fact that they can only hold a sequence of multiple items that are of the same type.

What's the Difference between Python Lists and Python Arrays?

Lists are one of the most common data structures in Python, and a core part of the language.

Lists and arrays behave similarly.

Just like arrays, lists are an ordered sequence of elements.

They are also mutable and not fixed in size, which means they can grow and shrink throughout the life of the program. Items can be added and removed, making them very flexible to work with.

However, lists and arrays are not the same thing.

Lists store items that are of various data types. This means that a list can contain integers, floating point numbers, strings, or any other Python data type, at the same time. That is not the case with arrays.

As mentioned in the section above, arrays store only items that are of the same single data type. There are arrays that contain only integers, or only floating point numbers, or only any other Python data type you want to use.

When to Use Python Arrays

Lists are built into the Python programming language, whereas arrays aren't. Arrays are not a built-in data structure, and therefore need to be imported via the array module in order to be used.

Arrays of the array module are a thin wrapper over C arrays, and are useful when you want to work with homogeneous data.

They are also more compact and take up less memory and space which makes them more size efficient compared to lists.

If you want to perform mathematical calculations, then you should use NumPy arrays by importing the NumPy package. Besides that, you should just use Python arrays when you really need to, as lists work in a similar way and are more flexible to work with.

How to Use Arrays in Python

In order to create Python arrays, you'll first have to import the array module which contains all the necassary functions.

There are three ways you can import the array module:

  • By using import array at the top of the file. This includes the module array. You would then go on to create an array using array.array().
import array

#how you would create an array
array.array()
  • Instead of having to type array.array() all the time, you could use import array as arr at the top of the file, instead of import array alone. You would then create an array by typing arr.array(). The arr acts as an alias name, with the array constructor then immediately following it.
import array as arr

#how you would create an array
arr.array()
  • Lastly, you could also use from array import *, with * importing all the functionalities available. You would then create an array by writing the array() constructor alone.
from array import *

#how you would create an array
array()

How to Define Arrays in Python

Once you've imported the array module, you can then go on to define a Python array.

The general syntax for creating an array looks like this:

variable_name = array(typecode,[elements])

Let's break it down:

  • variable_name would be the name of the array.
  • The typecode specifies what kind of elements would be stored in the array. Whether it would be an array of integers, an array of floats or an array of any other Python data type. Remember that all elements should be of the same data type.
  • Inside square brackets you mention the elements that would be stored in the array, with each element being separated by a comma. You can also create an empty array by just writing variable_name = array(typecode) alone, without any elements.

Below is a typecode table, with the different typecodes that can be used with the different data types when defining Python arrays:

TYPECODEC TYPEPYTHON TYPESIZE
'b'signed charint1
'B'unsigned charint1
'u'wchar_tUnicode character2
'h'signed shortint2
'H'unsigned shortint2
'i'signed intint2
'I'unsigned intint2
'l'signed longint4
'L'unsigned longint4
'q'signed long longint8
'Q'unsigned long longint8
'f'floatfloat4
'd'doublefloat8

Tying everything together, here is an example of how you would define an array in Python:

import array as arr 

numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])


print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [10, 20, 30])

Let's break it down:

  • First we included the array module, in this case with import array as arr .
  • Then, we created a numbers array.
  • We used arr.array() because of import array as arr .
  • Inside the array() constructor, we first included i, for signed integer. Signed integer means that the array can include positive and negative values. Unsigned integer, with H for example, would mean that no negative values are allowed.
  • Lastly, we included the values to be stored in the array in square brackets.

Keep in mind that if you tried to include values that were not of i typecode, meaning they were not integer values, you would get an error:

import array as arr 

numbers = arr.array('i',[10.0,20,30])


print(numbers)

#output

#Traceback (most recent call last):
# File "/Users/dionysialemonaki/python_articles/demo.py", line 14, in <module>
#   numbers = arr.array('i',[10.0,20,30])
#TypeError: 'float' object cannot be interpreted as an integer

In the example above, I tried to include a floating point number in the array. I got an error because this is meant to be an integer array only.

Another way to create an array is the following:

from array import *

#an array of floating point values
numbers = array('d',[10.0,20.0,30.0])

print(numbers)

#output

#array('d', [10.0, 20.0, 30.0])

The example above imported the array module via from array import * and created an array numbers of float data type. This means that it holds only floating point numbers, which is specified with the 'd' typecode.

How to Find the Length of an Array in Python

To find out the exact number of elements contained in an array, use the built-in len() method.

It will return the integer number that is equal to the total number of elements in the array you specify.

import array as arr 

numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])


print(len(numbers))

#output
# 3

In the example above, the array contained three elements – 10, 20, 30 – so the length of numbers is 3.

Array Indexing and How to Access Individual Items in an Array in Python

Each item in an array has a specific address. Individual items are accessed by referencing their index number.

Indexing in Python, and in all programming languages and computing in general, starts at 0. It is important to remember that counting starts at 0 and not at 1.

To access an element, you first write the name of the array followed by square brackets. Inside the square brackets you include the item's index number.

The general syntax would look something like this:

array_name[index_value_of_item]

Here is how you would access each individual element in an array:

import array as arr 

numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

print(numbers[0]) # gets the 1st element
print(numbers[1]) # gets the 2nd element
print(numbers[2]) # gets the 3rd element

#output

#10
#20
#30

Remember that the index value of the last element of an array is always one less than the length of the array. Where n is the length of the array, n - 1 will be the index value of the last item.

Note that you can also access each individual element using negative indexing.

With negative indexing, the last element would have an index of -1, the second to last element would have an index of -2, and so on.

Here is how you would get each item in an array using that method:

import array as arr 

numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

print(numbers[-1]) #gets last item
print(numbers[-2]) #gets second to last item
print(numbers[-3]) #gets first item
 
#output

#30
#20
#10

How to Search Through an Array in Python

You can find out an element's index number by using the index() method.

You pass the value of the element being searched as the argument to the method, and the element's index number is returned.

import array as arr 

numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

#search for the index of the value 10
print(numbers.index(10))

#output

#0

If there is more than one element with the same value, the index of the first instance of the value will be returned:

import array as arr 


numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30,10,20,30])

#search for the index of the value 10
#will return the index number of the first instance of the value 10
print(numbers.index(10))

#output

#0

How to Loop through an Array in Python

You've seen how to access each individual element in an array and print it out on its own.

You've also seen how to print the array, using the print() method. That method gives the following result:

import array as arr 

numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [10, 20, 30])

What if you want to print each value one by one?

This is where a loop comes in handy. You can loop through the array and print out each value, one-by-one, with each loop iteration.

For this you can use a simple for loop:

import array as arr 

numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

for number in numbers:
    print(number)
    
#output
#10
#20
#30

You could also use the range() function, and pass the len() method as its parameter. This would give the same result as above:

import array as arr  

values = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

#prints each individual value in the array
for value in range(len(values)):
    print(values[value])

#output

#10
#20
#30

How to Slice an Array in Python

To access a specific range of values inside the array, use the slicing operator, which is a colon :.

When using the slicing operator and you only include one value, the counting starts from 0 by default. It gets the first item, and goes up to but not including the index number you specify.

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

#get the values 10 and 20 only
print(numbers[:2])  #first to second position

#output

#array('i', [10, 20])

When you pass two numbers as arguments, you specify a range of numbers. In this case, the counting starts at the position of the first number in the range, and up to but not including the second one:

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])


#get the values 20 and 30 only
print(numbers[1:3]) #second to third position

#output

#rray('i', [20, 30])

Methods For Performing Operations on Arrays in Python

Arrays are mutable, which means they are changeable. You can change the value of the different items, add new ones, or remove any you don't want in your program anymore.

Let's see some of the most commonly used methods which are used for performing operations on arrays.

How to Change the Value of an Item in an Array

You can change the value of a specific element by speficying its position and assigning it a new value:

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

#change the first element
#change it from having a value of 10 to having a value of 40
numbers[0] = 40

print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [40, 20, 30])

How to Add a New Value to an Array

To add one single value at the end of an array, use the append() method:

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

#add the integer 40 to the end of numbers
numbers.append(40)

print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [10, 20, 30, 40])

Be aware that the new item you add needs to be the same data type as the rest of the items in the array.

Look what happens when I try to add a float to an array of integers:

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

#add the integer 40 to the end of numbers
numbers.append(40.0)

print(numbers)

#output

#Traceback (most recent call last):
#  File "/Users/dionysialemonaki/python_articles/demo.py", line 19, in <module>
#   numbers.append(40.0)
#TypeError: 'float' object cannot be interpreted as an integer

But what if you want to add more than one value to the end an array?

Use the extend() method, which takes an iterable (such as a list of items) as an argument. Again, make sure that the new items are all the same data type.

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

#add the integers 40,50,60 to the end of numbers
#The numbers need to be enclosed in square brackets

numbers.extend([40,50,60])

print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60])

And what if you don't want to add an item to the end of an array? Use the insert() method, to add an item at a specific position.

The insert() function takes two arguments: the index number of the position the new element will be inserted, and the value of the new element.

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

#add the integer 40 in the first position
#remember indexing starts at 0

numbers.insert(0,40)

print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [40, 10, 20, 30])

How to Remove a Value from an Array

To remove an element from an array, use the remove() method and include the value as an argument to the method.

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

numbers.remove(10)

print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [20, 30])

With remove(), only the first instance of the value you pass as an argument will be removed.

See what happens when there are more than one identical values:

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30,10,20])

numbers.remove(10)

print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [20, 30, 10, 20])

Only the first occurence of 10 is removed.

You can also use the pop() method, and specify the position of the element to be removed:

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30,10,20])

#remove the first instance of 10
numbers.pop(0)

print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [20, 30, 10, 20])

Conclusion

And there you have it - you now know the basics of how to create arrays in Python using the array module. Hopefully you found this guide helpful.

Thanks for reading and happy coding!

#python #programming 

Connor Mills

Connor Mills

1670560264

Understanding Arrays in Python

Learn how to use Python arrays. Create arrays in Python using the array module. You'll see how to define them and the different methods commonly used for performing operations on them.
 

The artcile covers arrays that you create by importing the array module. We won't cover NumPy arrays here.

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction to Arrays
    1. The differences between Lists and Arrays
    2. When to use arrays
  2. How to use arrays
    1. Define arrays
    2. Find the length of arrays
    3. Array indexing
    4. Search through arrays
    5. Loop through arrays
    6. Slice an array
  3. Array methods for performing operations
    1. Change an existing value
    2. Add a new value
    3. Remove a value
  4. Conclusion

Let's get started!


What are Python Arrays?

Arrays are a fundamental data structure, and an important part of most programming languages. In Python, they are containers which are able to store more than one item at the same time.

Specifically, they are an ordered collection of elements with every value being of the same data type. That is the most important thing to remember about Python arrays - the fact that they can only hold a sequence of multiple items that are of the same type.

What's the Difference between Python Lists and Python Arrays?

Lists are one of the most common data structures in Python, and a core part of the language.

Lists and arrays behave similarly.

Just like arrays, lists are an ordered sequence of elements.

They are also mutable and not fixed in size, which means they can grow and shrink throughout the life of the program. Items can be added and removed, making them very flexible to work with.

However, lists and arrays are not the same thing.

Lists store items that are of various data types. This means that a list can contain integers, floating point numbers, strings, or any other Python data type, at the same time. That is not the case with arrays.

As mentioned in the section above, arrays store only items that are of the same single data type. There are arrays that contain only integers, or only floating point numbers, or only any other Python data type you want to use.

When to Use Python Arrays

Lists are built into the Python programming language, whereas arrays aren't. Arrays are not a built-in data structure, and therefore need to be imported via the array module in order to be used.

Arrays of the array module are a thin wrapper over C arrays, and are useful when you want to work with homogeneous data.

They are also more compact and take up less memory and space which makes them more size efficient compared to lists.

If you want to perform mathematical calculations, then you should use NumPy arrays by importing the NumPy package. Besides that, you should just use Python arrays when you really need to, as lists work in a similar way and are more flexible to work with.

How to Use Arrays in Python

In order to create Python arrays, you'll first have to import the array module which contains all the necassary functions.

There are three ways you can import the array module:

  1. By using import array at the top of the file. This includes the module array. You would then go on to create an array using array.array().
import array

#how you would create an array
array.array()
  1. Instead of having to type array.array() all the time, you could use import array as arr at the top of the file, instead of import array alone. You would then create an array by typing arr.array(). The arr acts as an alias name, with the array constructor then immediately following it.
import array as arr

#how you would create an array
arr.array()
  1. Lastly, you could also use from array import *, with * importing all the functionalities available. You would then create an array by writing the array() constructor alone.
from array import *

#how you would create an array
array()

How to Define Arrays in Python

Once you've imported the array module, you can then go on to define a Python array.

The general syntax for creating an array looks like this:

variable_name = array(typecode,[elements])

Let's break it down:

  • variable_name would be the name of the array.
  • The typecode specifies what kind of elements would be stored in the array. Whether it would be an array of integers, an array of floats or an array of any other Python data type. Remember that all elements should be of the same data type.
  • Inside square brackets you mention the elements that would be stored in the array, with each element being separated by a comma. You can also create an empty array by just writing variable_name = array(typecode) alone, without any elements.

Below is a typecode table, with the different typecodes that can be used with the different data types when defining Python arrays:

TYPECODEC TYPEPYTHON TYPESIZE
'b'signed charint1
'B'unsigned charint1
'u'wchar_tUnicode character2
'h'signed shortint2
'H'unsigned shortint2
'i'signed intint2
'I'unsigned intint2
'l'signed longint4
'L'unsigned longint4
'q'signed long longint8
'Q'unsigned long longint8
'f'floatfloat4
'd'doublefloat8

Tying everything together, here is an example of how you would define an array in Python:

import array as arr 

numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])


print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [10, 20, 30])

Let's break it down:

  • First we included the array module, in this case with import array as arr .
  • Then, we created a numbers array.
  • We used arr.array() because of import array as arr .
  • Inside the array() constructor, we first included i, for signed integer. Signed integer means that the array can include positive and negative values. Unsigned integer, with H for example, would mean that no negative values are allowed.
  • Lastly, we included the values to be stored in the array in square brackets.

Keep in mind that if you tried to include values that were not of i typecode, meaning they were not integer values, you would get an error:

import array as arr 

numbers = arr.array('i',[10.0,20,30])


print(numbers)

#output

#Traceback (most recent call last):
# File "/Users/dionysialemonaki/python_articles/demo.py", line 14, in <module>
#   numbers = arr.array('i',[10.0,20,30])
#TypeError: 'float' object cannot be interpreted as an integer

In the example above, I tried to include a floating point number in the array. I got an error because this is meant to be an integer array only.

Another way to create an array is the following:

from array import *

#an array of floating point values
numbers = array('d',[10.0,20.0,30.0])

print(numbers)

#output

#array('d', [10.0, 20.0, 30.0])

The example above imported the array module via from array import * and created an array numbers of float data type. This means that it holds only floating point numbers, which is specified with the 'd' typecode.

How to Find the Length of an Array in Python

To find out the exact number of elements contained in an array, use the built-in len() method.

It will return the integer number that is equal to the total number of elements in the array you specify.

import array as arr 

numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])


print(len(numbers))

#output
# 3

In the example above, the array contained three elements – 10, 20, 30 – so the length of numbers is 3.

Array Indexing and How to Access Individual Items in an Array in Python

Each item in an array has a specific address. Individual items are accessed by referencing their index number.

Indexing in Python, and in all programming languages and computing in general, starts at 0. It is important to remember that counting starts at 0 and not at 1.

To access an element, you first write the name of the array followed by square brackets. Inside the square brackets you include the item's index number.

The general syntax would look something like this:

array_name[index_value_of_item]

Here is how you would access each individual element in an array:

import array as arr 

numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

print(numbers[0]) # gets the 1st element
print(numbers[1]) # gets the 2nd element
print(numbers[2]) # gets the 3rd element

#output

#10
#20
#30

Remember that the index value of the last element of an array is always one less than the length of the array. Where n is the length of the array, n - 1 will be the index value of the last item.

Note that you can also access each individual element using negative indexing.

With negative indexing, the last element would have an index of -1, the second to last element would have an index of -2, and so on.

Here is how you would get each item in an array using that method:

import array as arr 

numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

print(numbers[-1]) #gets last item
print(numbers[-2]) #gets second to last item
print(numbers[-3]) #gets first item
 
#output

#30
#20
#10

How to Search Through an Array in Python

You can find out an element's index number by using the index() method.

You pass the value of the element being searched as the argument to the method, and the element's index number is returned.

import array as arr 

numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

#search for the index of the value 10
print(numbers.index(10))

#output

#0

If there is more than one element with the same value, the index of the first instance of the value will be returned:

import array as arr 


numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30,10,20,30])

#search for the index of the value 10
#will return the index number of the first instance of the value 10
print(numbers.index(10))

#output

#0

How to Loop through an Array in Python

You've seen how to access each individual element in an array and print it out on its own.

You've also seen how to print the array, using the print() method. That method gives the following result:

import array as arr 

numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [10, 20, 30])

What if you want to print each value one by one?

This is where a loop comes in handy. You can loop through the array and print out each value, one-by-one, with each loop iteration.

For this you can use a simple for loop:

import array as arr 

numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

for number in numbers:
    print(number)
    
#output
#10
#20
#30

You could also use the range() function, and pass the len() method as its parameter. This would give the same result as above:

import array as arr  

values = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

#prints each individual value in the array
for value in range(len(values)):
    print(values[value])

#output

#10
#20
#30

How to Slice an Array in Python

To access a specific range of values inside the array, use the slicing operator, which is a colon :.

When using the slicing operator and you only include one value, the counting starts from 0 by default. It gets the first item, and goes up to but not including the index number you specify.


import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

#get the values 10 and 20 only
print(numbers[:2])  #first to second position

#output

#array('i', [10, 20])

When you pass two numbers as arguments, you specify a range of numbers. In this case, the counting starts at the position of the first number in the range, and up to but not including the second one:

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])


#get the values 20 and 30 only
print(numbers[1:3]) #second to third position

#output

#rray('i', [20, 30])

Methods For Performing Operations on Arrays in Python

Arrays are mutable, which means they are changeable. You can change the value of the different items, add new ones, or remove any you don't want in your program anymore.

Let's see some of the most commonly used methods which are used for performing operations on arrays.

How to Change the Value of an Item in an Array

You can change the value of a specific element by speficying its position and assigning it a new value:

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

#change the first element
#change it from having a value of 10 to having a value of 40
numbers[0] = 40

print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [40, 20, 30])

How to Add a New Value to an Array

To add one single value at the end of an array, use the append() method:

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

#add the integer 40 to the end of numbers
numbers.append(40)

print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [10, 20, 30, 40])

Be aware that the new item you add needs to be the same data type as the rest of the items in the array.

Look what happens when I try to add a float to an array of integers:

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

#add the integer 40 to the end of numbers
numbers.append(40.0)

print(numbers)

#output

#Traceback (most recent call last):
#  File "/Users/dionysialemonaki/python_articles/demo.py", line 19, in <module>
#   numbers.append(40.0)
#TypeError: 'float' object cannot be interpreted as an integer

But what if you want to add more than one value to the end an array?

Use the extend() method, which takes an iterable (such as a list of items) as an argument. Again, make sure that the new items are all the same data type.

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

#add the integers 40,50,60 to the end of numbers
#The numbers need to be enclosed in square brackets

numbers.extend([40,50,60])

print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60])

And what if you don't want to add an item to the end of an array? Use the insert() method, to add an item at a specific position.

The insert() function takes two arguments: the index number of the position the new element will be inserted, and the value of the new element.

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

#add the integer 40 in the first position
#remember indexing starts at 0

numbers.insert(0,40)

print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [40, 10, 20, 30])

How to Remove a Value from an Array

To remove an element from an array, use the remove() method and include the value as an argument to the method.

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

numbers.remove(10)

print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [20, 30])

With remove(), only the first instance of the value you pass as an argument will be removed.

See what happens when there are more than one identical values:


import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30,10,20])

numbers.remove(10)

print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [20, 30, 10, 20])

Only the first occurence of 10 is removed.

You can also use the pop() method, and specify the position of the element to be removed:

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30,10,20])

#remove the first instance of 10
numbers.pop(0)

print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [20, 30, 10, 20])

Conclusion

And there you have it - you now know the basics of how to create arrays in Python using the array module. Hopefully you found this guide helpful.

You'll start from the basics and learn in an interacitve and beginner-friendly way. You'll also build five projects at the end to put into practice and help reinforce what you learned.

Thanks for reading and happy coding!

Original article source at https://www.freecodecamp.org

#python 

Javascript Array Shift Example | Array.prototype.shift()

Javascript array shift() is an inbuilt function that removes the first item from an array and returns that deleted item. The shift() method changes the length of the array on which we are calling the shift() method. Javascript Array Shift method is not  pure function as it directly modifies the  array.

Javascript Array Shift Example

Javascript shift() method removes the item at the zeroeth index and shifts the values at consecutive indexes down, then returns that removed value.

If we want to remove the last item of an array, use the  Javascript pop() method.

If the length property is 0,  undefined is returned.

The syntax for shift() method is the following.

array.shift()

An array element can be a  string, a number, an  array, a boolean, or any other  object types that are allowed in the Javascript array. Let us take a simple example.

#javascript #array.prototype.shift #javascript pop #javascript shift

Royce  Reinger

Royce Reinger

1658140980

Concurrent-ruby: Modern Concurrency tools for Ruby

Concurrent Ruby 

Modern concurrency tools for Ruby. Inspired by Erlang, Clojure, Scala, Haskell, F#, C#, Java, and classic concurrency patterns.

The design goals of this gem are:

  • Be an 'unopinionated' toolbox that provides useful utilities without debating which is better or why
  • Remain free of external gem dependencies
  • Stay true to the spirit of the languages providing inspiration
  • But implement in a way that makes sense for Ruby
  • Keep the semantics as idiomatic Ruby as possible
  • Support features that make sense in Ruby
  • Exclude features that don't make sense in Ruby
  • Be small, lean, and loosely coupled
  • Thread-safety
  • Backward compatibility

Contributing

This gem depends on contributions and we appreciate your help. Would you like to contribute? Great! Have a look at issues with looking-for-contributor label. And if you pick something up let us know on the issue.

You can also get started by triaging issues which may include reproducing bug reports or asking for vital information, such as version numbers or reproduction instructions. If you would like to start triaging issues, one easy way to get started is to subscribe to concurrent-ruby on CodeTriage. Open Source Helpers

Thread Safety

Concurrent Ruby makes one of the strongest thread safety guarantees of any Ruby concurrency library, providing consistent behavior and guarantees on all four of the main Ruby interpreters (MRI/CRuby, JRuby, Rubinius, TruffleRuby).

Every abstraction in this library is thread safe. Specific thread safety guarantees are documented with each abstraction.

It is critical to remember, however, that Ruby is a language of mutable references. No concurrency library for Ruby can ever prevent the user from making thread safety mistakes (such as sharing a mutable object between threads and modifying it on both threads) or from creating deadlocks through incorrect use of locks. All the library can do is provide safe abstractions which encourage safe practices. Concurrent Ruby provides more safe concurrency abstractions than any other Ruby library, many of which support the mantra of "Do not communicate by sharing memory; instead, share memory by communicating". Concurrent Ruby is also the only Ruby library which provides a full suite of thread safe and immutable variable types and data structures.

We've also initiated discussion to document memory model of Ruby which would provide consistent behaviour and guarantees on all four of the main Ruby interpreters (MRI/CRuby, JRuby, Rubinius, TruffleRuby).

Features & Documentation

The primary site for documentation is the automatically generated API documentation which is up to date with latest release. This readme matches the master so may contain new stuff not yet released.

We also have a IRC (gitter).

Versioning

  • concurrent-ruby uses Semantic Versioning
  • concurrent-ruby-ext has always same version as concurrent-ruby
  • concurrent-ruby-edge will always be 0.y.z therefore following point 4 applies "Major version zero (0.y.z) is for initial development. Anything may change at any time. The public API should not be considered stable." However we additionally use following rules:
    • Minor version increment means incompatible changes were made
    • Patch version increment means only compatible changes were made

General-purpose Concurrency Abstractions

  • Async: A mixin module that provides simple asynchronous behavior to a class. Loosely based on Erlang's gen_server.
  • ScheduledTask: Like a Future scheduled for a specific future time.
  • TimerTask: A Thread that periodically wakes up to perform work at regular intervals.
  • Promises: Unified implementation of futures and promises which combines features of previous Future, Promise, IVar, Event, dataflow, Delay, and (partially) TimerTask into a single framework. It extensively uses the new synchronization layer to make all the features non-blocking and lock-free, with the exception of obviously blocking operations like #wait, #value. It also offers better performance.

Thread-safe Value Objects, Structures, and Collections

Collection classes that were originally part of the (deprecated) thread_safe gem:

  • Array A thread-safe subclass of Ruby's standard Array.
  • Hash A thread-safe subclass of Ruby's standard Hash.
  • Set A thread-safe subclass of Ruby's standard Set.
  • Map A hash-like object that should have much better performance characteristics, especially under high concurrency, than Concurrent::Hash.
  • Tuple A fixed size array with volatile (synchronized, thread safe) getters/setters.

Value objects inspired by other languages:

Structure classes derived from Ruby's Struct:

  • ImmutableStruct Immutable struct where values are set at construction and cannot be changed later.
  • MutableStruct Synchronized, mutable struct where values can be safely changed at any time.
  • SettableStruct Synchronized, write-once struct where values can be set at most once, either at construction or any time thereafter.

Thread-safe variables:

  • Agent: A way to manage shared, mutable, asynchronous, independent state. Based on Clojure's Agent.
  • Atom: A way to manage shared, mutable, synchronous, independent state. Based on Clojure's Atom.
  • AtomicBoolean A boolean value that can be updated atomically.
  • AtomicFixnum A numeric value that can be updated atomically.
  • AtomicReference An object reference that may be updated atomically.
  • Exchanger A synchronization point at which threads can pair and swap elements within pairs. Based on Java's Exchanger.
  • MVar A synchronized single element container. Based on Haskell's MVar and Scala's MVar.
  • ThreadLocalVar A variable where the value is different for each thread.
  • TVar A transactional variable implementing software transactional memory (STM). Based on Clojure's Ref.

Java-inspired ThreadPools and Other Executors

  • See the thread pool overview, which also contains a list of other Executors available.

Thread Synchronization Classes and Algorithms

Deprecated

Deprecated features are still available and bugs are being fixed, but new features will not be added.

  • Future: An asynchronous operation that produces a value. Replaced by Promises.
    • .dataflow: Built on Futures, Dataflow allows you to create a task that will be scheduled when all of its data dependencies are available. Replaced by Promises.
  • Promise: Similar to Futures, with more features. Replaced by Promises.
  • Delay Lazy evaluation of a block yielding an immutable result. Based on Clojure's delay. Replaced by Promises.
  • IVar Similar to a "future" but can be manually assigned once, after which it becomes immutable. Replaced by Promises.

Edge Features

These are available in the concurrent-ruby-edge companion gem.

These features are under active development and may change frequently. They are expected not to keep backward compatibility (there may also lack tests and documentation). Semantic versions will be obeyed though. Features developed in concurrent-ruby-edge are expected to move to concurrent-ruby when final.

Actor: Implements the Actor Model, where concurrent actors exchange messages. Status: Partial documentation and tests; depends on new future/promise framework; stability is good.

Channel: Communicating Sequential Processes (CSP). Functionally equivalent to Go channels with additional inspiration from Clojure core.async. Status: Partial documentation and tests.

LazyRegister

LockFreeLinkedSet Status: will be moved to core soon.

LockFreeStack Status: missing documentation and tests.

Promises::Channel A first in first out channel that accepts messages with push family of methods and returns messages with pop family of methods. Pop and push operations can be represented as futures, see #pop_op and #push_op. The capacity of the channel can be limited to support back pressure, use capacity option in #initialize. #pop method blocks ans #pop_op returns pending future if there is no message in the channel. If the capacity is limited the #push method blocks and #push_op returns pending future.

Cancellation The Cancellation abstraction provides cooperative cancellation.

The standard methods Thread#raise of Thread#kill available in Ruby are very dangerous (see linked the blog posts bellow). Therefore concurrent-ruby provides an alternative.

Throttle A tool managing concurrency level of tasks.

ErlangActor Actor implementation which precisely matches Erlang actor behaviour. Requires at least Ruby 2.1 otherwise it's not loaded.

WrappingExecutor A delegating executor which modifies each task before the task is given to the target executor it delegates to.

Supported Ruby versions

  • MRI 2.2 and above
  • Latest JRuby 9000
  • Latest TruffleRuby

The legacy support for Rubinius is kept for the moment but it is no longer maintained and is liable to be removed. If you would like to help please respond to #739.

Usage

Everything within this gem can be loaded simply by requiring it:

require 'concurrent'

Requiring only specific abstractions from Concurrent Ruby is not yet supported.

To use the tools in the Edge gem it must be required separately:

require 'concurrent-edge'

If the library does not behave as expected, Concurrent.use_stdlib_logger(Logger::DEBUG) could help to reveal the problem.

Installation

gem install concurrent-ruby

or add the following line to Gemfile:

gem 'concurrent-ruby', require: 'concurrent'

and run bundle install from your shell.

Edge Gem Installation

The Edge gem must be installed separately from the core gem:

gem install concurrent-ruby-edge

or add the following line to Gemfile:

gem 'concurrent-ruby-edge', require: 'concurrent-edge'

and run bundle install from your shell.

C Extensions for MRI

Potential performance improvements may be achieved under MRI by installing optional C extensions. To minimise installation errors the C extensions are available in the concurrent-ruby-ext extension gem. concurrent-ruby and concurrent-ruby-ext are always released together with same version. Simply install the extension gem too:

gem install concurrent-ruby-ext

or add the following line to Gemfile:

gem 'concurrent-ruby-ext'

and run bundle install from your shell.

In code it is only necessary to

require 'concurrent'

The concurrent-ruby gem will automatically detect the presence of the concurrent-ruby-ext gem and load the appropriate C extensions.

Note For gem developers

No gems should depend on concurrent-ruby-ext. Doing so will force C extensions on your users. The best practice is to depend on concurrent-ruby and let users to decide if they want C extensions.

Building the gem

Requirements

  • Recent CRuby
  • JRuby, rbenv install jruby-9.2.17.0
  • Set env variable CONCURRENT_JRUBY_HOME to point to it, e.g. /usr/local/opt/rbenv/versions/jruby-9.2.17.0
  • Install Docker, required for Windows builds

Publishing the Gem

  • Update version.rb
  • Update the CHANGELOG
  • Update the Yard documentation
    • Add the new version to docs-source/signpost.md. Needs to be done only if there are visible changes in the documentation.
    • Run bundle exec rake yard to update the master documentation and signpost.
    • Run bundle exec rake yard:<new-version> to add or update the documentation of the new version.
  • Commit (and push) the changes.
  • Use be rake release to release the gem. It consists of ['release:checks', 'release:build', 'release:test', 'release:publish'] steps. It will ask at the end before publishing anything. Steps can also be executed individually.

Maintainers

Special Thanks to

to the past maintainers

and to Ruby Association for sponsoring a project "Enhancing Ruby’s concurrency tooling" in 2018.

Author: Ruby-concurrency
Source Code: https://github.com/ruby-concurrency/concurrent-ruby 
License: View license

#ruby #java #javascript 

Concurrent Ruby: Modern Concurrency tools for Ruby.

Concurrent Ruby

Modern concurrency tools for Ruby. Inspired by Erlang, Clojure, Scala, Haskell, F#, C#, Java, and classic concurrency patterns.

The design goals of this gem are:

  • Be an 'unopinionated' toolbox that provides useful utilities without debating which is better or why
  • Remain free of external gem dependencies
  • Stay true to the spirit of the languages providing inspiration
  • But implement in a way that makes sense for Ruby
  • Keep the semantics as idiomatic Ruby as possible
  • Support features that make sense in Ruby
  • Exclude features that don't make sense in Ruby
  • Be small, lean, and loosely coupled
  • Thread-safety
  • Backward compatibility

Contributing

This gem depends on contributions and we appreciate your help. Would you like to contribute? Great! Have a look at issues with looking-for-contributor label. And if you pick something up let us know on the issue.

You can also get started by triaging issues which may include reproducing bug reports or asking for vital information, such as version numbers or reproduction instructions. If you would like to start triaging issues, one easy way to get started is to subscribe to concurrent-ruby on CodeTriage. Open Source Helpers

Thread Safety

Concurrent Ruby makes one of the strongest thread safety guarantees of any Ruby concurrency library, providing consistent behavior and guarantees on all four of the main Ruby interpreters (MRI/CRuby, JRuby, Rubinius, TruffleRuby).

Every abstraction in this library is thread safe. Specific thread safety guarantees are documented with each abstraction.

It is critical to remember, however, that Ruby is a language of mutable references. No concurrency library for Ruby can ever prevent the user from making thread safety mistakes (such as sharing a mutable object between threads and modifying it on both threads) or from creating deadlocks through incorrect use of locks. All the library can do is provide safe abstractions which encourage safe practices. Concurrent Ruby provides more safe concurrency abstractions than any other Ruby library, many of which support the mantra of "Do not communicate by sharing memory; instead, share memory by communicating". Concurrent Ruby is also the only Ruby library which provides a full suite of thread safe and immutable variable types and data structures.

We've also initiated discussion to document memory model of Ruby which would provide consistent behaviour and guarantees on all four of the main Ruby interpreters (MRI/CRuby, JRuby, Rubinius, TruffleRuby).

Features & Documentation

The primary site for documentation is the automatically generated API documentation which is up to date with latest release. This readme matches the master so may contain new stuff not yet released.

We also have a IRC (gitter).

Versioning

  • concurrent-ruby uses Semantic Versioning
  • concurrent-ruby-ext has always same version as concurrent-ruby
  • concurrent-ruby-edge will always be 0.y.z therefore following point 4 applies "Major version zero (0.y.z) is for initial development. Anything may change at any time. The public API should not be considered stable." However we additionally use following rules:
    • Minor version increment means incompatible changes were made
    • Patch version increment means only compatible changes were made

General-purpose Concurrency Abstractions

  • Async: A mixin module that provides simple asynchronous behavior to a class. Loosely based on Erlang's gen_server.
  • ScheduledTask: Like a Future scheduled for a specific future time.
  • TimerTask: A Thread that periodically wakes up to perform work at regular intervals.
  • Promises: Unified implementation of futures and promises which combines features of previous Future, Promise, IVar, Event, dataflow, Delay, and (partially) TimerTask into a single framework. It extensively uses the new synchronization layer to make all the features non-blocking and lock-free, with the exception of obviously blocking operations like #wait, #value. It also offers better performance.

Thread-safe Value Objects, Structures, and Collections

Collection classes that were originally part of the (deprecated) thread_safe gem:

  • Array A thread-safe subclass of Ruby's standard Array.
  • Hash A thread-safe subclass of Ruby's standard Hash.
  • Set A thread-safe subclass of Ruby's standard Set.
  • Map A hash-like object that should have much better performance characteristics, especially under high concurrency, than Concurrent::Hash.
  • Tuple A fixed size array with volatile (synchronized, thread safe) getters/setters.

Value objects inspired by other languages:

Structure classes derived from Ruby's Struct:

  • ImmutableStruct Immutable struct where values are set at construction and cannot be changed later.
  • MutableStruct Synchronized, mutable struct where values can be safely changed at any time.
  • SettableStruct Synchronized, write-once struct where values can be set at most once, either at construction or any time thereafter.

Thread-safe variables:

  • Agent: A way to manage shared, mutable, asynchronous, independent state. Based on Clojure's Agent.
  • Atom: A way to manage shared, mutable, synchronous, independent state. Based on Clojure's Atom.
  • AtomicBoolean A boolean value that can be updated atomically.
  • AtomicFixnum A numeric value that can be updated atomically.
  • AtomicReference An object reference that may be updated atomically.
  • Exchanger A synchronization point at which threads can pair and swap elements within pairs. Based on Java's Exchanger.
  • MVar A synchronized single element container. Based on Haskell's MVar and Scala's MVar.
  • ThreadLocalVar A variable where the value is different for each thread.
  • TVar A transactional variable implementing software transactional memory (STM). Based on Clojure's Ref.

Java-inspired ThreadPools and Other Executors

  • See the thread pool overview, which also contains a list of other Executors available.

Thread Synchronization Classes and Algorithms

Deprecated

Deprecated features are still available and bugs are being fixed, but new features will not be added.

  • Future: An asynchronous operation that produces a value. Replaced by Promises.
    • .dataflow: Built on Futures, Dataflow allows you to create a task that will be scheduled when all of its data dependencies are available. Replaced by Promises.
  • Promise: Similar to Futures, with more features. Replaced by Promises.
  • Delay Lazy evaluation of a block yielding an immutable result. Based on Clojure's delay. Replaced by Promises.
  • IVar Similar to a "future" but can be manually assigned once, after which it becomes immutable. Replaced by Promises.

Edge Features

These are available in the concurrent-ruby-edge companion gem.

These features are under active development and may change frequently. They are expected not to keep backward compatibility (there may also lack tests and documentation). Semantic versions will be obeyed though. Features developed in concurrent-ruby-edge are expected to move to concurrent-ruby when final.

Actor: Implements the Actor Model, where concurrent actors exchange messages. Status: Partial documentation and tests; depends on new future/promise framework; stability is good.

Channel: Communicating Sequential Processes (CSP). Functionally equivalent to Go channels with additional inspiration from Clojure core.async. Status: Partial documentation and tests.

LazyRegister

LockFreeLinkedSet Status: will be moved to core soon.

LockFreeStack Status: missing documentation and tests.

Promises::Channel A first in first out channel that accepts messages with push family of methods and returns messages with pop family of methods. Pop and push operations can be represented as futures, see #pop_op and #push_op. The capacity of the channel can be limited to support back pressure, use capacity option in #initialize. #pop method blocks ans #pop_op returns pending future if there is no message in the channel. If the capacity is limited the #push method blocks and #push_op returns pending future.

Cancellation The Cancellation abstraction provides cooperative cancellation.

The standard methods Thread#raise of Thread#kill available in Ruby are very dangerous (see linked the blog posts bellow). Therefore concurrent-ruby provides an alternative.

Throttle A tool managing concurrency level of tasks.

ErlangActor Actor implementation which precisely matches Erlang actor behaviour. Requires at least Ruby 2.1 otherwise it's not loaded.

WrappingExecutor A delegating executor which modifies each task before the task is given to the target executor it delegates to.

Supported Ruby versions

  • MRI 2.2 and above
  • Latest JRuby 9000
  • Latest TruffleRuby

The legacy support for Rubinius is kept for the moment but it is no longer maintained and is liable to be removed. If you would like to help please respond to #739.

Usage

Everything within this gem can be loaded simply by requiring it:

require 'concurrent'

Requiring only specific abstractions from Concurrent Ruby is not yet supported.

To use the tools in the Edge gem it must be required separately:

require 'concurrent-edge'

If the library does not behave as expected, Concurrent.use_stdlib_logger(Logger::DEBUG) could help to reveal the problem.

Installation

gem install concurrent-ruby

or add the following line to Gemfile:

gem 'concurrent-ruby', require: 'concurrent'

and run bundle install from your shell.

Edge Gem Installation

The Edge gem must be installed separately from the core gem:

gem install concurrent-ruby-edge

or add the following line to Gemfile:

gem 'concurrent-ruby-edge', require: 'concurrent-edge'

and run bundle install from your shell.

C Extensions for MRI

Potential performance improvements may be achieved under MRI by installing optional C extensions. To minimise installation errors the C extensions are available in the concurrent-ruby-ext extension gem. concurrent-ruby and concurrent-ruby-ext are always released together with same version. Simply install the extension gem too:

gem install concurrent-ruby-ext

or add the following line to Gemfile:

gem 'concurrent-ruby-ext'

and run bundle install from your shell.

In code it is only necessary to

require 'concurrent'

The concurrent-ruby gem will automatically detect the presence of the concurrent-ruby-ext gem and load the appropriate C extensions.

Note For gem developers

No gems should depend on concurrent-ruby-ext. Doing so will force C extensions on your users. The best practice is to depend on concurrent-ruby and let users to decide if they want C extensions.

Building the gem

Requirements

  • Recent CRuby
  • JRuby, rbenv install jruby-9.2.17.0
  • Set env variable CONCURRENT_JRUBY_HOME to point to it, e.g. /usr/local/opt/rbenv/versions/jruby-9.2.17.0
  • Install Docker, required for Windows builds

Publishing the Gem

  • Update version.rb
  • Update the CHANGELOG
  • Update the Yard documentation
    • Add the new version to docs-source/signpost.md. Needs to be done only if there are visible changes in the documentation.
    • Run bundle exec rake yard to update the master documentation and signpost.
    • Run bundle exec rake yard:<new-version> to add or update the documentation of the new version.
  • Commit (and push) the changes.
  • Use be rake release to release the gem. It consists of ['release:checks', 'release:build', 'release:test', 'release:publish'] steps. It will ask at the end before publishing anything. Steps can also be executed individually.

Maintainers

Special Thanks to

to the past maintainers

and to Ruby Association for sponsoring a project "Enhancing Ruby’s concurrency tooling" in 2018.

License and Copyright

Concurrent Ruby is free software released under the MIT License.

The Concurrent Ruby logo was designed by David Jones. It is Copyright © 2014 Jerry D'Antonio. All Rights Reserved.


Author: ruby-concurrency
Source code: https://github.com/ruby-concurrency/concurrent-ruby
License: View license

#ruby #ruby-on-rails