Tensorflow.js Crash Course 2020 - Build a Neural Network on the Browser

Tensorflow.js Crash Course 2020 - Build a Neural Network on the Browser

Tensorflow.js Crash Course 2020 - Learn how to build a basic Neural Network on the Browser. A beginner’s guide to understanding the inner workings of Deep Learning

This course will give you a brief idea in understanding the flow of Tensorflow JS in 2020. I will go through all the steps needed in creating a basic neural network on the browser. Tensorflow JS will provide us with the basic pre-built function, that will help us in creating and using browser to train 'Machine Learning' based models.

Who this course is for:

  • Beginner JavaScript developers
  • Tensorflow JS developer
  • Students who want to understand the fundamental concepts about tensorflowJS usage

Learn TensorFlow.js - Deep Learning and Neural Networks with JavaScript

Learn TensorFlow.js - Deep Learning and Neural Networks with JavaScript

This full course introduces the concept of client-side artificial neural networks. We will learn how to deploy and run models along with full deep learning applications in the browser! To implement this cool capability, we’ll be using TensorFlow.js (TFJS), TensorFlow’s JavaScript library.

By the end of this video tutorial, you will have built and deployed a web application that runs a neural network in the browser to classify images! To get there, we'll learn about client-server deep learning architectures, converting Keras models to TFJS models, serving models with Node.js, tensor operations, and more!

⭐️Course Sections⭐️

⌨️ 0:00 - Intro to deep learning with client-side neural networks

⌨️ 6:06 - Convert Keras model to Layers API format

⌨️ 11:16 - Serve deep learning models with Node.js and Express

⌨️ 19:22 - Building UI for neural network web app

⌨️ 27:08 - Loading model into a neural network web app

⌨️ 36:55 - Explore tensor operations with VGG16 preprocessing

⌨️ 45:16 - Examining tensors with the debugger

⌨️ 1:00:37 - Broadcasting with tensors

⌨️ 1:11:30 - Running MobileNet in the browser

Machine Learning in JavaScript with TensorFlow.js

Machine Learning in JavaScript with TensorFlow.js

TensorFlow.js is a library for Machine Learning in JavaScript. Develop ML models in JavaScript, and use ML directly in the browser or in Node.js. Interested in using Machine Learning in JavaScript applications and websites? If you’re a Javascript developer who’s new to ML, TensorFlow.js is a great way to begin learning. Or, if you’re a ML developer who’s new to Javascript, read on to learn more about new opportunities for in-browser ML.

We’re excited to introduce TensorFlow.js, an open-source library you can use to define, train, and run machine learning models entirely in the browser, using Javascript and a high-level layers API. If you’re a Javascript developer who’s new to ML, TensorFlow.js is a great way to begin learning. Or, if you’re a ML developer who’s new to Javascript, read on to learn more about new opportunities for in-browser ML. In this post, we’ll give you a quick overview of TensorFlow.js, and getting started resources you can use to try it out.

In-Browser ML

Running machine learning programs entirely client-side in the browser unlocks new opportunities, like interactive ML! If you’re watching the livestream for the TensorFlow Developer Summit, during the TensorFlow.js talk you’ll find a demo where @dsmilkov and @nsthorat train a model to control a PAC-MAN game using computer vision and a webcam, entirely in the browser. You can try it out yourself, too, with the link below — and find the source in the examples folder.

If you’d like to try another game, give the Emoji Scavenger Hunt a whirl — this time, from a browser on your mobile phone.

ML running in the browser means that from a user’s perspective, there’s no need to install any libraries or drivers. Just open a webpage, and your program is ready to run. In addition, it’s ready to run with GPU acceleration. TensorFlow.js automatically supports WebGL, and will accelerate your code behind the scenes when a GPU is available. Users may also open your webpage from a mobile device, in which case your model can take advantage of sensor data, say from a gyroscope or accelerometer. Finally, all data stays on the client, making TensorFlow.js useful for low-latency inference, as well as for privacy preserving applications.

What can you do with TensorFlow.js?

If you’re developing with TensorFlow.js, here are three workflows you can consider.

  • You can import an existing, pre-trained model for inference. If you have an existing TensorFlow or Keras model you’ve previously trained offline, you can convert into TensorFlow.js format, and load it into the browser for inference.
  • You can re-train an imported model. As in the Pac-Man demo above, you can use transfer learning to augment an existing model trained offline using a small amount of data collected in the browser using a technique called Image Retraining. This is one way to train an accurate model quickly, using only a small amount of data.
  • Author models directly in browser. You can also use TensorFlow.js to define, train, and run models entirely in the browser using Javascript and a high-level layers API. If you’re familiar with Keras, the high-level layers API should feel familiar.
Let’s see some code

If you like, you can head directly to the samples or tutorials to get started. These show how-to export a model defined in Python for inference in the browser, as well as how to define and train models entirely in Javascript. As a quick preview, here’s a snippet of code that defines a neural network to classify flowers, much like on the getting started guide on TensorFlow.org. Here, we’ll define a model using a stack of layers.

import * as tf from ‘@tensorflow/tfjs’;
const model = tf.sequential();
model.add(tf.layers.dense({inputShape: [4], units: 100}));
model.add(tf.layers.dense({units: 4}));
model.compile({loss: ‘categoricalCrossentropy’, optimizer: ‘sgd’});

The layers API we’re using here supports all of the Keras layers found in the examples directory (including Dense, CNN, LSTM, and so on). We can then train our model using the same Keras-compatible API with a method call:

await model.fit(
  xData, yData, {
    batchSize: batchSize,
    epochs: epochs
});

The model is now ready to use to make predictions:

// Get measurements for a new flower to generate a prediction
// The first argument is the data, and the second is the shape.
const inputData = tf.tensor2d([[4.8, 3.0, 1.4, 0.1]], [1, 4]);

// Get the highest confidence prediction from our model
const result = model.predict(inputData);
const winner = irisClasses[result.argMax().dataSync()[0]];

// Display the winner
console.log(winner);

TensorFlow.js also includes a low-level API (previously deeplearn.js) and support for Eager execution. You can learn more about these by watching the talk at the TensorFlow Developer Summit.


An overview of TensorFlow.js APIs. TensorFlow.js is powered by WebGL and provides a high-level layers API for defining models, and a low-level API for linear algebra and automatic differentiation. TensorFlow.js supports importing TensorFlow SavedModels and Keras models.

How does TensorFlow.js relate to deeplearn.js?

Good question! TensorFlow.js, an ecosystem of JavaScript tools for machine learning, is the successor to deeplearn.js which is now called TensorFlow.js Core. TensorFlow.js also includes a Layers API, which is a higher level library for building machine learning models that uses Core, as well as tools for automatically porting TensorFlow SavedModels and Keras hdf5 models. For answers to more questions like this, check out the FAQ.

Deep Learning from Scratch and Using Tensorflow in Python

Deep Learning from Scratch and Using Tensorflow in Python

In this article, we will learn how deep learning works and get familiar with its terminology — such as backpropagation and batch size

Originally published by Milad Toutounchian at https://towardsdatascience.com
Deep learning is one of the most popular models currently being used in real-world, Data Science applications. It’s been an effective model in areas that range from image to text to voice/music. With the increase in its use, the ability to quickly and scalably implement deep learning becomes paramount. The rise of deep learning platforms such as Tensorflow, help developers implement what they need to in easier ways.

In this article, we will learn how deep learning works and get familiar with its terminology — such as backpropagation and batch size. We will implement a simple deep learning model — from theory to scratch implementation — for a predefined input and output in Python, and then do the same using deep learning platforms such as Keras and Tensorflow. We have written this simple deep learning model using Keras and Tensorflow version 1.x and version 2.0 with three different levels of complexity and ease of coding.

Deep Learning Implementation from Scratch

Consider a simple multi-layer-perceptron with four input neurons, one hidden layer with three neurons and an output layer with one neuron. We have three data-samples for the input denoted as X, and three data-samples for the desired output denoted as yt. So, each input data-sample has four features.

# Inputs and outputs of the neural net:
import numpy as np

X=np.array([[1.0, 0.0, 1.0, 0.0],[1.0, 0.0, 1.0, 1.0],[0.0, 1.0, 0.0, 1.0]])
yt=np.array([[1.0],[1.0],[0.0]])

The x*(m) in this figure is one-sample of Xh(m) is the output of the hidden layer for input x(m), and Wi* and Wh are the weights.

The goal of a neural net (NN) is to obtain weights and biases such that for a given input, the NN provides the desired output. But, we do not know the appropriate weights and biases in advance, so we update the weights and biases such that the error between the output of NN, yp(m), and desired ones, yt(m), is minimized. This iterative minimization process is called the NN training.

Assume the activation functions for both hidden and output layers are sigmoid functions. Therefore,

The size of weights, biases and the relationships between input and outputs of the neural net

Where activation function is the sigmoid, m is the mth data-sample and yp(m) is the NN output.

The error function, which measures the difference between the output of NN with the desired one, can be expressed mathematically as:

The Error defined for the neural net which is squared error

The pseudocode for the above NN has been summarized below:

pseudocode for the neural net training

From our pseudocode, we realize that the partial derivative of Error (E) with respect to parameters (weights and biases) should be computed. Using the chain rule from calculus we can write:

We have two options here for updating the weights and biases in backward path (backward path means updating weights and biases such that error is minimized):

  1. Use all *N * samples of the training data
  2. Use one sample (or a couple of samples)

For the first one, we say the batch size is N. For the second one, we say batch size is 1, if use one sample to updates the parameters. So batch size means how many data samples are being used for updating the weights and biases.

You can find the implementation of the above neural net, in which the gradient of the error with respect to parameters is calculated Symbolically, with different batch sizes here.

As you can see with the above example, creating a simple deep learning model from scratch involves methods that are very complex. In the next section, we will see how deep learning frameworks can assist in introducing scalability and greater ease of implementation to our model.

Deep Learning implementation using Keras, Tensorflow 1.x and 2.0

In the previous section, we computed the gradient of Error w.r.t. parameters from using the chain rule. We saw first-hand that it is not an easy or scalable approach. Also, keep in mind that we evaluate the partial derivatives at each iteration, and as a result, the Symbolic Gradient is not needed although its value is important. This is where deep-learning frameworks such as Keras and Tensorflow can play their role. The deep-learning frameworks use an AutoDiff method for numerical calculations of partial gradients. If you’re not familiar with AutoDiff, StackExchange has a great example to walk through.

The AutoDiff decomposes the complex expression into a set of primitive ones, i.e. expressions consisting of at most a single function call. As the differentiation rules for each separate expression are already known, the final results can be computed in an efficient way.

We have implemented the NN model with three different levels in Keras, Tensorflow 1.x and Tensorflow 2.0:

1- High-Level (Keras and Tensorflow 2.0): High-Level Tensorflow 2.0 with Batch Size 1

2- Medium-Level (Tensorflow 1.x and 2.0): Medium-Level Tensorflow 1.x with Batch Size 1 , Medium-Level Tensorflow 1.x with Batch Size NMedium-Level Tensorflow 2.0 with Batch Size 1Medium-Level Tensorflow v 2.0 with Batch Size N

3- Low-Level (Tensorflow 1.x): Low-Level Tensorflow 1.x with Batch Size N

Code Snippets:

For the High-Level, we have accomplished the implementation using Keras and Tensorflow v 2.0 with model.train_on_batch:

# High-Level implementation of the neural net in Tensorflow:
model.compile(loss=mse, optimizer=optimizer)
for _ in range(2000):
    for step, (x, y) in enumerate(zip(X_data, y_data)):
        model.train_on_batch(np.array([x]), np.array([y]))

In the Medium-Level using Tensorflow 1.x, we have defined:

E = tf.reduce_sum(tf.pow(ypred - Y, 2))
optimizer = tf.train.GradientDescentOptimizer(0.1)
grads = optimizer.compute_gradients(E, [W_h, b_h, W_o, b_o])
updates = optimizer.apply_gradients(grads)

This ensures that in the for loop, the updates variable will be updated. For Medium-Level, the gradients and their updates are defined outside the for_loop and inside the for_loop updates is iteratively updated. In the Medium-Level using Tensorflow v 2.x, we have used:

# Medium-Level implementation of the neural net in Tensorflow

# In for_loop
with tf.GradientTape() as tape:
   x = tf.convert_to_tensor(np.array([x]), dtype=tf.float64)
   y = tf.convert_to_tensor(np.array([y]), dtype=tf.float64)
   ypred = model(x)
   loss = mse(y, ypred)
gradients = tape.gradient(loss, model.trainable_weights)
optimizer.apply_gradients(zip(gradients, model.trainable_weights))

In Low-Level implementation, each weight and bias is updated separately. In the Low-Level using Tensorflow v 1.x, we have defined:

# Low-Level implementation of the neural net in Tensorflow:
E = tf.reduce_sum(tf.pow(ypred - Y, 2))
dE_dW_h = tf.gradients(E, [W_h])[0]
dE_db_h = tf.gradients(E, [b_h])[0]
dE_dW_o = tf.gradients(E, [W_o])[0]
dE_db_o = tf.gradients(E, [b_o])[0]
# In for_loop:
evaluated_dE_dW_h = sess.run(dE_dW_h,
                                     feed_dict={W_h: W_h_i, b_h: b_h_i, W_o: W_o_i, b_o: b_o_i, X: X_data.T, Y: y_data.T})
        W_h_i = W_h_i - 0.1 * evaluated_dE_dW_h
        evaluated_dE_db_h = sess.run(dE_db_h,
                                     feed_dict={W_h: W_h_i, b_h: b_h_i, W_o: W_o_i, b_o: b_o_i, X: X_data.T, Y: y_data.T})
        b_h_i = b_h_i - 0.1 * evaluated_dE_db_h
        evaluated_dE_dW_o = sess.run(dE_dW_o,
                                     feed_dict={W_h: W_h_i, b_h: b_h_i, W_o: W_o_i, b_o: b_o_i, X: X_data.T, Y: y_data.T})
        W_o_i = W_o_i - 0.1 * evaluated_dE_dW_o
        evaluated_dE_db_o = sess.run(dE_db_o,
                                     feed_dict={W_h: W_h_i, b_h: b_h_i, W_o: W_o_i, b_o: b_o_i, X: X_data.T, Y: y_data.T})
        b_o_i = b_o_i - 0.1 * evaluated_dE_db_o

As you can see with the above low level implementation, the developer has more control over every single step of numerical operations and calculations.

Conclusion

We have now shown that implementing from scratch even a simple deep learning model by using Symbolic gradient computation for weight and bias updates is not an easy or scalable approach. Using deep learning frameworks accelerates this process as a result of using AutoDiff, which is basically a stable numerical gradient computation for updating weights and biases.

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Further reading

Machine Learning A-Z™: Hands-On Python & R In Data Science

Python for Data Science and Machine Learning Bootcamp

Machine Learning, Data Science and Deep Learning with Python

Deep Learning A-Z™: Hands-On Artificial Neural Networks

Artificial Intelligence A-Z™: Learn How To Build An AI

A Complete Machine Learning Project Walk-Through in Python

Machine Learning: how to go from Zero to Hero

Top 18 Machine Learning Platforms For Developers

10 Amazing Articles On Python Programming And Machine Learning

100+ Basic Machine Learning Interview Questions and Answers