Defining a Continuous Testing Strategy

Continuous testing is both a practice and a mindset. Developers and quality assurance specialists initiate the practice of continuous testing in the devops CI/CD (continuous integration/continuous development) pipeline, triggering a list of automated tests that run with every build and delivery. The mindset comes when developers, engineers, and quality assurance specialists collaborate on testing strategies and implementations.

This collaboration is critically important because many technology organizations do not adequately fund, dedicate resources, or schedule time for adequate testing. That means the development organization must establish a testing strategy that defines an optimal focus, implementation strategy, and ongoing support functions that fit within constraints.Although development teams should create a holistic testing strategy, they also need a strategy specific to continuous testing for the following reasons:

  • Continuous testing is an optimal way to implement a shift-left testing strategy because it provides developers with feedback before code reaches a delivery environment. It is particularly important for running code quality and security analysis so that developers learn and adopt better coding practices.
  • It can be a more expensive investment since continuous tests have to be automated first, integrated into the CI/CD pipeline, and configured with alerts so that tools notify the right people of discovered issues.
  • Since these tests run during builds and delivery, teams have to be selective of the types of tests to implement and consider their running durations. Long-running tests are not optimal for continuous testing if they slow down developers and build pipelines.

The best way to review the trade-offs and implementation choices and for teams to collaborate on solutions is by aligning on a continuous testing strategy.

Define a persona-based continuous testing strategy

Let’s define a continuous testing strategy using an agile approach. When product owners create agile user stories, a best practice is to write them from the perspective of the end-user who is receiving value and benefiting from the implementation. These stories often start with the phrase “as a certain user type or user persona” to remind the agile development team who the customer is, why the implementation is important to them, and how the customer benefits.

Defining personas should be fundamental to the strategy since continuous testing has different people who benefit from the tests, and we have to prioritize what types of tests to implement. A few of these personas or stakeholders and their risk concerns include:

  • Developers who want to ensure code quality and that their code modifications do not break services or other areas of the code that have dependencies.
  • Operations teams concerned that code changes don’t introduce performance issues or impact the reliability of the application.
  • Information security teams who are interested in static code analysis, penetration tests, and other early indicators of whether new code or other changes create security risks.
  • Quality assurance specialists who represent the interests of the application’s end-users and the product owner. Testing APIs, functionalities, and browser and mobile user interfaces are their primary areas to validate that new, changed, and existing functionality all meet business requirements.
  • Architects who represent service and API quality and are the best people to define standards on whether new or changed protocols present a quality concern.
  • Database governance specialists concerned about whether developers inadvertently introduced new data quality or security issues in the build.

The agile development team must respond and correct issues when a CI/CD build fails, but what testing gets prioritized now has defined personas acting as stakeholders.

These stakeholders should define their priorities on what risks and issues should get flagged to developers early and during the build pipeline.

#testing #continuous testing #programming

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Defining a Continuous Testing Strategy
Shawn  Durgan

Shawn Durgan

1594862482

8 Tips to Optimize Your Continuous Testing Strategy

In this competitive digital era, there has always been a constant demand for continuous digital improvement. Even if automation is a prominent keyword nowadays, a recent report says that only 30% of the organizations have adopted automation testing. Although the organizations invest a considerable amount of time and money in transforming their development processes, they fail to reap the benefits of the shift in the right direction by choosing only a few aspects of testing.

Change is inevitable in the software development lifecycle and to go hand in hand with the ever-changing dynamics and produce high-quality software, it is important to rely on implementing an effective Continuous testing Strategy. The development teams have to be focused on optimizing the delivery cycles and provide uninterrupted business experience.

What Is Continuous Testing?

Continuous testing is a type of testing in which involves evaluating the quality of software often at multiple stages of the continuous delivery process for early detection of errors ultimately providing quality software and business continuity. It involves testing in multiple developments and QA phases to achieve continuous quality and improvement. Continuous testing plays a key role in DevOps using automation tools that help developers in getting quick feedback on the defects and make changes accordingly.

Challenges to an Effective Continuous Testing

Organizations want to frequent deployments but the majority are unable to even reduce their software development cycles because of a lack of effective continuous testing delivery strategy. The success comes when there happens to be a mix of both manual and automated testing consistently throughout the delivery process. It becomes really important to automate every step to move fast in aspects like test design, test orchestration, execution, etc.

Test automation strategy is the backbone of the final product that a business delivers. It should be strong and flexible enough to bear the impact of any change and every variable of the testing process. Let’s discuss how optimizing continuous delivery testing strategy helps to improve the testing process and to increase the software quality:

1. Thorough Test Automation Plan

Research says that the majority of organizations mostly focus on specific forms of testing. For example, few businesses focus on API integration testing and UI testing, and a few focus on both individually. But what they lack is a detail-oriented automated continuous integration testing strategy that involves all of the above types of testing. Choosing a specific type of testing is right in some business scenarios but a business should always be equipped with a plan that can accommodate any type of testing which can be used whenever the need arises. The real comparison of continuous testing vs test automation will always persist considering the scale and requirements of the business.

2. Initial Trial and Testing

Introducing unreliable and lengthy test cases in the process leads to a huge wastage of time and effort putting the QA teams to get indulged in an ineffectual analysis of each code commit. Instead, the QA teams can do a bit of testing by adding nominal test suites to avoid big risks and check its impact along the way. Gradually adding stable test cases. It is important to have more stable test cases than counting how many were executed especially in DevOps.

#tutorial #performance #continuous delivery #continuous testing #mobile app testing #testing

Tamia  Walter

Tamia Walter

1596754901

Testing Microservices Applications

The shift towards microservices and modular applications makes testing more important and more challenging at the same time. You have to make sure that the microservices running in containers perform well and as intended, but you can no longer rely on conventional testing strategies to get the job done.

This is where new testing approaches are needed. Testing your microservices applications require the right approach, a suitable set of tools, and immense attention to details. This article will guide you through the process of testing your microservices and talk about the challenges you will have to overcome along the way. Let’s get started, shall we?

A Brave New World

Traditionally, testing a monolith application meant configuring a test environment and setting up all of the application components in a way that matched the production environment. It took time to set up the testing environment, and there were a lot of complexities around the process.

Testing also requires the application to run in full. It is not possible to test monolith apps on a per-component basis, mainly because there is usually a base code that ties everything together, and the app is designed to run as a complete app to work properly.

Microservices running in containers offer one particular advantage: universal compatibility. You don’t have to match the testing environment with the deployment architecture exactly, and you can get away with testing individual components rather than the full app in some situations.

Of course, you will have to embrace the new cloud-native approach across the pipeline. Rather than creating critical dependencies between microservices, you need to treat each one as a semi-independent module.

The only monolith or centralized portion of the application is the database, but this too is an easy challenge to overcome. As long as you have a persistent database running on your test environment, you can perform tests at any time.

Keep in mind that there are additional things to focus on when testing microservices.

  • Microservices rely on network communications to talk to each other, so network reliability and requirements must be part of the testing.
  • Automation and infrastructure elements are now added as codes, and you have to make sure that they also run properly when microservices are pushed through the pipeline
  • While containerization is universal, you still have to pay attention to specific dependencies and create a testing strategy that allows for those dependencies to be included

Test containers are the method of choice for many developers. Unlike monolith apps, which lets you use stubs and mocks for testing, microservices need to be tested in test containers. Many CI/CD pipelines actually integrate production microservices as part of the testing process.

Contract Testing as an Approach

As mentioned before, there are many ways to test microservices effectively, but the one approach that developers now use reliably is contract testing. Loosely coupled microservices can be tested in an effective and efficient way using contract testing, mainly because this testing approach focuses on contracts; in other words, it focuses on how components or microservices communicate with each other.

Syntax and semantics construct how components communicate with each other. By defining syntax and semantics in a standardized way and testing microservices based on their ability to generate the right message formats and meet behavioral expectations, you can rest assured knowing that the microservices will behave as intended when deployed.

Ways to Test Microservices

It is easy to fall into the trap of making testing microservices complicated, but there are ways to avoid this problem. Testing microservices doesn’t have to be complicated at all when you have the right strategy in place.

There are several ways to test microservices too, including:

  • Unit testing: Which allows developers to test microservices in a granular way. It doesn’t limit testing to individual microservices, but rather allows developers to take a more granular approach such as testing individual features or runtimes.
  • Integration testing: Which handles the testing of microservices in an interactive way. Microservices still need to work with each other when they are deployed, and integration testing is a key process in making sure that they do.
  • End-to-end testing: Which⁠—as the name suggests⁠—tests microservices as a complete app. This type of testing enables the testing of features, UI, communications, and other components that construct the app.

What’s important to note is the fact that these testing approaches allow for asynchronous testing. After all, asynchronous development is what makes developing microservices very appealing in the first place. By allowing for asynchronous testing, you can also make sure that components or microservices can be updated independently to one another.

#blog #microservices #testing #caylent #contract testing #end-to-end testing #hoverfly #integration testing #microservices #microservices architecture #pact #testing #unit testing #vagrant #vcr

Quality Assurance Services | Best QA team for Hire

Software testing is often underrated when it comes to tight deadlines and deliverables. Developers try to compromise in software testing phases, and this leads to more confusion and client dissatisfaction. A professional software developer is the one who remains calm an ensures that the developed solutions go through proper checks and trouble shooting well before the software is due to be delivered or deployed. There are situations when the software development companies do not have an in-house testing team or lack certain tools and resources. In this case, they use third party software testing companies to complete the process.

Software Testing-All you need to know about

Software testing, we all know is a mandatory process that needs to be carried out during, after and beyond the development of any software solution. It helps identify major and minor glitches. Early and regular identification, can help programmers ensure that the finished product is error free. Imagine, developing a software and deploying it without any testing or quality checks? What would be the result? The answers could be endless and rolling out a software this way could jeopardize an entire software development organization.

The lack of proper and robust software testing is a major problem facing development companies. This can be due to many reasons. So when integrating a successful testing processes into software development, a development company should keep a few things in mind.

What software testing actually means

Verifying whether software meets the expected parameters. It is not a superficial but an in-depth process
A healthy process involves investigating the product to find any information that is of value to the stakeholders.
Trying to identify problems before software is released to stakeholders
An integral step in software development that is often underrated is constant communication with stakeholders and collaboration to improve the product
It is important to keep these points in mind when searching for a good software testing partner. Getting software testing done by a third-party vendor is not an easy task because it can be hard to determine if a company will be a good partner or a bad one. Your knowledge of proper testing and quality assurance processes comes into play here.

How to excel in manual quality testing

Proper Organization
Organization is an important step not only in testing but other processes too. When we talk about manual testing, it becomes necessary to create an organized structure to store all the relevant details of the project so that no integral information is lost or missed. The stored information and communication details are helpful when creating a successful testing strategy and revisiting information exchanged earlier.

Writing detailed bug reports
Bug reports submitted by the tester are of the utmost importance because these reports contain reports of genuine issue in the application. A detailed report is a great benefit to developers because they can just go through it and see what needs to be done next. If the bug report is not clear or it is incomplete, it creates confusion and may lead to misunderstandings or delayed delivery dates.

Clarity in test cases
The optimal size for a test case is 3 to 8 steps. Clarity in test cases can determine the efficiency in your testing tasks. Just like a detailed bug report is important similarly clear and precise test cases are required to carry out and effective testing process. Test cases should not be very long, the longer the test case the trickier it will be for the developer to work through it.

Besides clear case studies and complete bug reports, the tester must have ability to be focused and stay positive while testing the software application. These features enhance the testing process and make it more reliable.

Tools used for robust software testing

Where manual testing is considered a priority in a software development process, automated testing aids the process and makes it more effective.

Good testing tools:

1. Selenium
Selenium is an automated testing tool that runs on various OS systems like Linux, Windows, and iOS. It is a testing framework to perform web application testing. Selenium helps the testers to write tests in various programming languages like Java, PHP, C#, Python, Groovy, Ruby, and Perl. It provides a record and review of the features. These records are easy to learn and utilize. Selenium proudly supports some of the largest browser vendors. Major browsers often include Selenium as a native part of their browser. Selenium is undoubtedly the base for most of the other software testing tools in general.

2. Tosca Testsuite
Tosca Testsuite by Tricentis uses model-based test automation to automate software testing.

Tosca Testsuite comes with the following capabilities:

  • Plan and design test case
  • Test data provisioning
  • Service virtualization network
  • Tests mobile apps
  • Integration management
  • Risk coverage

3. TestingWhiz
The enterprise package of TestingWhiz offers automated testing solutions like web testing, software testing, database testing, API testing, mobile app testing, regression testing and more. It is the testing tool that offers code-less scripting and involves processes such as optimization, automation and cross-browser testing.

Other features include:

  • Keyword-driven, data-driven testing, and distributed testing
  • Browser Extension Testing
  • Object Eye Internal Recorder
  • SMTP Integration
  • Bug tracking tools- Jira, Mantis, TFS and FogBugz
  • Test management tools – HP Quality Center, Zephyr, TestRail, and Microsoft VSTS
  • Customized Recording Rule

4. TestComplete
TestComplete is a functional testing platform that offers various solutions to automate testing for desktop, web, and mobile applications.

TestComplete offers the following features:

  • GUI testing
  • Scripting Language Support – JavaScript, Python, VBScript, JScript, DelphiScript, C++Script & C# Script
  • Test visualizer
  • Scripted testing
  • Test recording and playback

5. Ranorex
Ranorex Studio covers testing of all desktop, web, and mobile applications.

Ranorex offers the following features:

  • GUI recognition
  • Reusable test codes
  • Bug detection
  • Integration with various tools
  • Record and playback

6. HPE Unified Functional Testing
Formerly known as HP QuickTest Professional, HPE Unified Functional Testing offers testing automation for functional and regression testing for software applications.

Visual Basic Scripting Edition is used by this tool to register the test processes and operates the various objects and controls in testing the applications.

Other features are:

  • Mercury Business Process Testing
  • Unique Smart Object Recognition
  • Error handling mechanism
  • Creation of parameters for objects, checkpoints, and data-driven tables
  • Automated documentation

7. Sahi
This open-source testing tool is written in Java and JavaScript programming languages.

Sahi provides the following features:

  • Performs multi-browser testing
  • Supports ExtJS, ZK, Dojo, YUI, etc. frameworks
  • Record and playback on the browser testing

8. Watir
Watir, pronounced as ‘Water’, is an open-source testing tool made up of Ruby libraries to automate web application testing.

Watir offers the following features:

  • Tests any language-based web application
  • Cross-browser testing
  • Compatible with business-driven development tools like RSpec, Cucumber, and Test/Unit
  • Tests web page’s buttons, forms, links, and their responses

9. Telerik TestStudio

Telerik TestStudio offers one solution to automate desktop, web, and mobile application testing including UI, load, and performance testing.

Telerik TestStudio offers various compatibilities like:

  • Support for programming languages like HTML, AJAX, ASP.NET, JavaScript, Silverlight, WPF, and MVC
  • Integration with Visual Basic Studio 2010 and 2012
  • Record and playback
  • Cross-browser testing
  • Manual testing
  • Integration with bug tracking tools

10. Katalon Studio

Katalon Studio by Katalon LLC is built on top of Appium with a specialized IDE interface for API, web and mobile testing. This tool includes a full package of powerful features that help overcome common challenges in web UI test automation.

Katalon Studio consists of the following features:

  • XPath, object re-identification
  • Built-in object repository
  • Supports Java/Groovy scripting languages
  • Built-in support for Image-based testing
  • Support Continuous Integration tools like Jenkins & TeamCity
  • Supports Duel-editor Interface
  • Customizable execution workflow

Conclusion
Software testing is the whole and sole process in which the application’s actual working state can be diagnosed. Some software development organizations get it done in house whereas, some require outsourcing. Software testing is a vast topic and its process vary from organization to organization. But it is a critical step and should be carried out by any reliable team.

#software testing best practices #software test strategies #software testing strategies #software testing approach #qa strategies #testing best practices

Software Testing 101: Regression Tests, Unit Tests, Integration Tests

Automation and segregation can help you build better software
If you write automated tests and deliver them to the customer, he can make sure the software is working properly. And, at the end of the day, he paid for it.

Ok. We can segregate or separate the tests according to some criteria. For example, “white box” tests are used to measure the internal quality of the software, in addition to the expected results. They are very useful to know the percentage of lines of code executed, the cyclomatic complexity and several other software metrics. Unit tests are white box tests.

#testing #software testing #regression tests #unit tests #integration tests

Dejah  Reinger

Dejah Reinger

1599859380

How to Do API Testing?

Nowadays API testing is an integral part of testing. There are a lot of tools like postman, insomnia, etc. There are many articles that ask what is API, What is API testing, but the problem is How to do API testing? What I need to validate.

Note: In this article, I am going to use postman assertions for all the examples since it is the most popular tool. But this article is not intended only for the postman tool.

Let’s directly jump to the topic.

Let’s consider you have an API endpoint example http://dzone.com/getuserDetails/{{username}} when you send the get request to that URL it returns the JSON response.

My API endpoint is http://dzone.com/getuserDetails/{{username}}

The response is in JSON format like below

JSON

{
  "jobTitle": "string",
  "userid": "string",
  "phoneNumber": "string",
  "password": "string",
  "email": "user@example.com",
  "firstName": "string",
  "lastName": "string",
  "userName": "string",
  "country": "string",
  "region": "string",
  "city": "string",
  "department": "string",
  "userType": 0
}

In the JSON we can see there are properties and associated values.

Now, For example, if we need details of the user with the username ‘ganeshhegde’ we need to send a **GET **request to **http://dzone.com/getuserDetails/ganeshhegde **

dzone.com

Now there are two scenarios.

1. Valid Usecase: User is available in the database and it returns user details with status code 200

2. Invalid Usecase: User is Unavailable/Invalid user in this case it returns status with code 404 with not found message.

#tutorial #performance #api #test automation #api testing #testing and qa #application programming interface #testing as a service #testing tutorial #api test