Visual Studio 2019 for Mac version 8.7 is now available

Visual Studio 2019 for Mac version 8.7 is available today and includes support for gRPC / OpenAPI client generation and improved unit testing integration. Additionally, it includes several improvements for Xamarin developers, including Xamarin.Forms 4.8 Support. This release also includes initial support for macOS Big Sur, with the exception of Xamarin support. macOS Big Sur support for Xamarin is expected in one of the first servicing releases for Visual Studio for Mac 8.7.

Are you ready for the latest version of Visual Studio 2019 for Mac? If so, version 8.7 is available for you to download today! With this release, we’ve continued to polish the existing experience, paying close attention to many of the problem areas mentioned by our users.

gRPC and OpenAPI Client Generation

Visual Studio for Mac now includes support for generating an API client from an OpenAPI or gRPC service. This allows you to generate the client from a local file or URL, manage service references, and regenerate the client code if the service changes.

To add a new reference to an OpenAPI or gRPC service, right-click on the Connected Services node in the Solution pad and select Open Service Gallery.

Visual Studio for Mac screenshot showing the new Connected Services node in the Solution Pad

Once you’ve opened the Connected Services Gallery, you have the option to add either an OpenAPI or gRPC reference.

Screenshot showing the Connected Services Gallery in Visual Studio for Mac

Clicking on either of the options will launch a prompt allowing you to enter the service reference, either by file path or URL.

You can also select whether to generate the following client class types when generating a gRPC client:

  • Client
  • Server
  • Client and Server
  • Messages Only (used to generate strongly typed classes based on message properties, with no generated server or client code)

When generating an OpenAPI client, you can specify the namespace and additional options which are passed through to the code generator. Code generation is based on the dotnet-grpc and dotnet-openapi command-line tools.

After generating a service reference, you can view and modify it in the Connected Services Gallery as shown below.

Screenshot showing an added gRPC service in the Connected Services Gallery

For more information on using a generated OpenAPI client, see the Getting Started with NSwag tutorial.

For more information on using a generated gRPC client, see the Create a gRPC client and server in ASP.NET Core tutorial.

Right-Click to Run Unit Tests

When editing a C## class that contains unit tests, a developer can run tests using the “Run Test(s)” item in a context menu by right clicking in the file, the body of a test class, or the body of a test method. The context menu for the editor has been updated to include Run/Debug Test options:

Screenshot of Visual Studio for Mac showing the Run Tests and Debug Tests options in the code editor context menu

These new commands can be run using the following keyboard shortcuts (in the Visual Studio for Mac key bindings):

  • Run Test(s): ⌘T
  • Debug Test(s): ⌘⌥T

The Run command will run tests based on the rules below, in the “Rules for determining which tests to run” section. Running a test is the same as selecting it in the Unit Test pad and running that test.

The Debug command will run tests the same as described above but will also attach the debugger when running the tests. You can customize these key bindings in the Visual Studio for Mac preferences (Visual Studio > Preferences > Environment > Key Bindings) as explained in the documentation.

Rules for determining which tests to run

The Run/Debug Test(s) commands will run one or more tests, based on the following rules.

  • Run all tests in a file by right-clicking in the body of a file with test methods, and choose Run Tests.
  • Run a single test by right-clicking in a test method, or on the method signature, and choose Run Test.
  • Run all tests in a single class by right clicking in the body of a class definition, or the method signature, and choose Run Tests.

As an example, using the code below…

using Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting;

namespace GardenTracker.Test
{
    [TestClass]
    public class UnitTest1
    {
        [TestMethod]
        public void TestMethod1()
        {
        }

        [TestMethod]
        public void TestMethod2()
        {
            Assert.IsTrue(true);
        }
    }

    [TestClass]
    public class UnitTest2
    {
        [TestMethod]
        public void TestMethod3()
        {
            Assert.IsTrue(true);
        }
    }
}

Here’s what happens when you right-click in different places:

  • When you right-click inside a test method (e.g. inside TestMethod1()), just that test is executed.
  • When you right-click inside a test class but not in a specific test method (e.g. directly on the UnitTest1 class), all tests in that class are executed.
  • When you right-click outside of a class, all tests in that file are executed.

#visual studio #mac #microsoft #dev

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Visual Studio 2019 for Mac version 8.7 is now available
Juanita  Apio

Juanita Apio

1618243440

[Guest post] Learn C# with Visual Studio, Visual Studio for Mac, and Unity

UPDATE: The book giveaway challenge is complete. We will be announcing winners on the Visual Studio blog within the next week. Thank you for your submissions!

Visual Studio is an amazing development tool. But Visual Studio and Visual Studio for Mac are more than just intuitive, state-of-the-art development environments. They’re also remarkably powerful learning and exploration tools, with features to help you create and understand your code. I love teaching and learning about C## with Visual Studio. That’s why my co-author, Jenny Greene, and I put Visual Studio and Visual Studio for Mac right at the center of our latest book, _Head First C# _(4th edition), published by O’Reilly Media. _Head First C# _incorporates Visual Studio directly in the learning. combining Visual Studio with the unique and innovative “brain-friendly” Head First approach to teaching helps us make learning C## easier and more fun for our readers.

#visual studio #c# #unity #visual studio 2019 for mac #visual studio for mac

Brain  Crist

Brain Crist

1595337660

Visual Studio 2019 v16.7 Preview 2 Available Today!

C++ Updates

Visual Studio v16.7 Preview 2 delivers various improvements in the C++ space. Within the Connection Manager, you’re now able to edit remote SSH connections, e.g. if the IP address of your target system changes and needs to be updated. You’re also able to set default remote connections to be consumed via **${defaultRemoteMachineName} **in CMakeSettings.json and launch.vs.json.

When you edit a remote connection, Visual Studio will no longer need to recopy headers to Windows for a native IntelliSense experience. Likewise, setting default remote connections is useful for checking CMakeSettings.json and launch.vs.json into source control with no user or machine-specific information. These remote connections over SSH allow you to build and debug your C++ projects on a remote Linux system directly from Visual Studio.

CPP Add or Remove SSH Connections

C++ Add or Remove SSH Connections with Connection Manager

This release also brings enhanced IntelliSense support for Clang on Windows (clang-cl) in Visual Studio. The clang include path now includes the clang libraries, we’ve improved the display of in-editor squiggles (particularly when using the std library), and we’ve added support for C++2a is supported in clang mode.

The Preview release also contains four new code analysis rules to incorporate additional safety features into C++: C26817C26818C26819, and C26820. Please see the C++ Team Blog for more info.

In addition, new C++20 Standard Library features have been implemented. A detailed list is provided in the STL Changelog on GitHub.

.NET Productivity

Quick Info now displays the diagnostic ID along with a help link where you can easily navigate to our documentation to learn more about warnings and errors in your code.

Diagnostic ID with help links in .NET Productivity

Diagnostic ID with help links in .NET Productivity

Git Productivity

We continue to release more Git functionality in Visual Studio 2019. This time we focus on merge conflict resolution. We’ve revamped the Visual Studio merge editor by decoupling it from TFVC and focusing it on Git.

A new gold info bar at the top of a file will tell you when there are merge conflicts that need to be manually resolved. Clicking will take you to the merge editor, which now has more informative tiles and captions to help you distinguish between the conflicting branches. We’ve reduced the clutter around the zoom margin, health margin, and the toolbar. In addition, it is easier to parse conflicts with aligned matching lines, word level differences, and visible whitespace when it is the only difference. You can turn off non-conflicting differences to just focus on the conflicts. You can also resolve add/add conflicts at the file level now with a two-way merge. Finally, we have added a checkbox to resolve all conflicts on one side or the other with a single click.

Try the new features by toggling the Preview Feature for New Git user experience in Tools > Options.

Improved Git Functionality in Visual Studio 2019 under the Tools Menu

Improved Git Functionality in Visual Studio 2019 under the Tools Menu

In other Git improvements, we will now close any open folders or solutions before starting a new clone operation, so that Visual Studio can open the newly cloned repo to help you get to your code faster. We’ve improved upon the commit text box, adding inline error checking. And we’ve added UI to help you more clearly understand what is happening when you initialize and push a repository to a remote host like GitHub or Azure Repos.

Local Process with Kubernetes

Local Process with Kubernetes allows you to write, test and debug your .NET code on your development workstation while connected to your Kubernetes cluster with the rest of your application or services. By connecting your development workstation to your cluster, you eliminate the need to manually run and configure dependent services on your development machine. Environment variables, connection strings and volumes from the cluster are available to your microservice code running locally.

For more information on Local Process with Kubernetes, we have detailed it out in our team blog.

#visual studio #announcement #visual studio 2019 #visual studio code

Visual Studio 2019 for Mac version 8.7 is now available

Visual Studio 2019 for Mac version 8.7 is available today and includes support for gRPC / OpenAPI client generation and improved unit testing integration. Additionally, it includes several improvements for Xamarin developers, including Xamarin.Forms 4.8 Support. This release also includes initial support for macOS Big Sur, with the exception of Xamarin support. macOS Big Sur support for Xamarin is expected in one of the first servicing releases for Visual Studio for Mac 8.7.

Are you ready for the latest version of Visual Studio 2019 for Mac? If so, version 8.7 is available for you to download today! With this release, we’ve continued to polish the existing experience, paying close attention to many of the problem areas mentioned by our users.

gRPC and OpenAPI Client Generation

Visual Studio for Mac now includes support for generating an API client from an OpenAPI or gRPC service. This allows you to generate the client from a local file or URL, manage service references, and regenerate the client code if the service changes.

To add a new reference to an OpenAPI or gRPC service, right-click on the Connected Services node in the Solution pad and select Open Service Gallery.

Visual Studio for Mac screenshot showing the new Connected Services node in the Solution Pad

Once you’ve opened the Connected Services Gallery, you have the option to add either an OpenAPI or gRPC reference.

Screenshot showing the Connected Services Gallery in Visual Studio for Mac

Clicking on either of the options will launch a prompt allowing you to enter the service reference, either by file path or URL.

You can also select whether to generate the following client class types when generating a gRPC client:

  • Client
  • Server
  • Client and Server
  • Messages Only (used to generate strongly typed classes based on message properties, with no generated server or client code)

When generating an OpenAPI client, you can specify the namespace and additional options which are passed through to the code generator. Code generation is based on the dotnet-grpc and dotnet-openapi command-line tools.

After generating a service reference, you can view and modify it in the Connected Services Gallery as shown below.

Screenshot showing an added gRPC service in the Connected Services Gallery

For more information on using a generated OpenAPI client, see the Getting Started with NSwag tutorial.

For more information on using a generated gRPC client, see the Create a gRPC client and server in ASP.NET Core tutorial.

Right-Click to Run Unit Tests

When editing a C## class that contains unit tests, a developer can run tests using the “Run Test(s)” item in a context menu by right clicking in the file, the body of a test class, or the body of a test method. The context menu for the editor has been updated to include Run/Debug Test options:

Screenshot of Visual Studio for Mac showing the Run Tests and Debug Tests options in the code editor context menu

These new commands can be run using the following keyboard shortcuts (in the Visual Studio for Mac key bindings):

  • Run Test(s): ⌘T
  • Debug Test(s): ⌘⌥T

The Run command will run tests based on the rules below, in the “Rules for determining which tests to run” section. Running a test is the same as selecting it in the Unit Test pad and running that test.

The Debug command will run tests the same as described above but will also attach the debugger when running the tests. You can customize these key bindings in the Visual Studio for Mac preferences (Visual Studio > Preferences > Environment > Key Bindings) as explained in the documentation.

Rules for determining which tests to run

The Run/Debug Test(s) commands will run one or more tests, based on the following rules.

  • Run all tests in a file by right-clicking in the body of a file with test methods, and choose Run Tests.
  • Run a single test by right-clicking in a test method, or on the method signature, and choose Run Test.
  • Run all tests in a single class by right clicking in the body of a class definition, or the method signature, and choose Run Tests.

As an example, using the code below…

using Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting;

namespace GardenTracker.Test
{
    [TestClass]
    public class UnitTest1
    {
        [TestMethod]
        public void TestMethod1()
        {
        }

        [TestMethod]
        public void TestMethod2()
        {
            Assert.IsTrue(true);
        }
    }

    [TestClass]
    public class UnitTest2
    {
        [TestMethod]
        public void TestMethod3()
        {
            Assert.IsTrue(true);
        }
    }
}

Here’s what happens when you right-click in different places:

  • When you right-click inside a test method (e.g. inside TestMethod1()), just that test is executed.
  • When you right-click inside a test class but not in a specific test method (e.g. directly on the UnitTest1 class), all tests in that class are executed.
  • When you right-click outside of a class, all tests in that file are executed.

#visual studio #mac #microsoft #dev

Visual Studio 2019 v16.7 and v16.8 Preview 1 Release Today!

Today we are excited to announce the release of Visual Studio 2019 version 16.7 and Visual Studio 2019 version 16.8 Preview 1. Each of these releases have features we have been working hard to deliver.  Install version 16.7 to start using our highlight improvements. Included in this list are Git integration including a new merge editor and easy conflict resolution, WPF design-time data, C++ support for 64-bit projects and debug builds, and additional IntelliSense functionality. In addition, Visual Studio 2019 v16.7 is our next long-term servicing release. In conjunction, we are releasing Visual Studio 2019 v16.8 Preview 1 which you can install from our download site. Our Preview version brings you pre-release functionality of the Git Repository window for easier navigation and more uses for the Quick Actions and Refactoring menu. We’ve provided additional highlights of what’s new below, yet additional information can be found in our release notes.

As always, we love to hear your feedback. Developer Community is the best venue to share your experiences so we can continue to learn how these features impact your work, both positively and negatively. Through this portal, we can have more in-depth conversation around future features.

New in Visual Studio 2019 v16.7

Git Integration

For this release, if you haven’t tried the new Git user experience yet, you can turn it on from the Preview Features pane of Tools > Options.

We’ve revamped the Visual Studio merge editor by decoupling it from Team Foundation Version Control and focusing it on Git. A new gold info bar at the top of a file will tell you when there are merge conflicts needing manual resolution.

Image image of merge editor gold info bar

Clicking will take you to the merge editor. Based on your feedback, we’ve modified the titles and captions, clearly indicating incoming and current branch names. This helps distinguish between conflicting branches. In addition, we’ve reduced the clutter around the zoom margin, health margin, and the toolbar. Now, it is easier to parse conflicts with aligned matching lines, word level differences, and visible whitespace when that is the only difference. You can turn off non-conflicting differences to just focus on the conflicts. You can also resolve add/add conflicts at the file level now with a two-way merge.

Git Conflict Resolution

We have also added a checkbox to resolve all conflicts on one side or the other with a single click.

Image Image of merge editor

Git Repository Window

To give you a complete full-screen experience to focus on dedicated Git activities, we built the new Git Repository window. From here you can view and manage all the local, remote, and upstream branches in your repository. You can also switch between branches and view the history graph of each branch. Double clicking on a commit will give you more details about it.

Image Git Repo window, image

Git Repo Window in Visual Studio 2019 v16.7

If you would like to learn more about these improvements, check out the detailed Git blog post.

XAML Tools WPF/UWP

Coming from our WPF and UWP tooling team are a few important improvements.

Design-time Data

First of all, comes design-time data. Before this feature improvement, when adding new controls that are empty or working with controls that get populated with data via data binding at run time, it was hard to see how the end result would look during the design-time experience. That would get especially inconvenient if data binding or the data source didn’t yet exist. We wanted to give you a way to see your controls filled with data during the design-time development. That’s why we are introducing a new feature called design-time data. Now, for each XAML property for built-in controls, you can easily set a value visible only in the designer and not compiled into your binaries. To use this functionality, simply put a d: in front of the property you want to mock, and the designer will do the rest.

#visual studio #.net #announcement #git integration #productivity #visual studio 2019 #xaml

Cayla  Erdman

Cayla Erdman

1602355560

New Features in Visual Studio 2019 v16.8 Preview 3.1

In conjunction with Ignite 2020, we are releasing Visual Studio 2019 v16.8 Preview 3.1. Our events always bring an excitement to our team as we launch new functionality to our product. In this release, we are giving you access to improvements in Git Integration, C++20 conformance, .NET Productivity, Web Tools, and XAML . We can’t wait to hear how these features impact your work for the better. Equally, we love to hear how we can strive for constant improvement through our Developer Community.

While taking in one of our free Ignite 2020 sessions, why not download our latest Preview release and give some of these new features a try?

Install Visual Studio 2019 v16.8 Preview 3.1

GitHub Codespaces for Visual Studio

GitHub Codespaces for Visual Studio is now available as a limited beta in Visual Studio 2019 Preview 3.1. This gives you an instant cloud development environment that lets you code from anywhere. You can use the features you love from Visual Studio 2019 in a codespace to develop, test, and deploy modern apps including ASP.NET Core web apps, .NET Core, CMake, and C++ console / library apps. GitHub Codespaces for Visual Studio is available to a subset of GitHub users that sign-up while in limited beta. Over time, more users will get access based on availability and sign up date.

Sign-up to try GitHub Codespaces for Visual Studio

Create GitHub Codespaces from Visual Studio 2019

Create GitHub Codespaces from Visual Studio 2019

On a local machine, Visual Studio competes with other apps for resources with limits in CPU and disk space. With Codespaces, many of the CPU intensive operations like loading the solution, building, and debugging are offloaded to the cloud. This allows you to work on enterprise scale application without impacting your local machine’s resources. This also allowed us to dramatically reduce what we install locally when you’re building apps in a Codespace. Installing Visual Studio to connect to GitHub Codespaces takes minutes.

#visual studio #.net #announcement #debugging and diagnostics #productivity #visual studio 2019 #xamarin #xaml