Wiley  Mayer

Wiley Mayer

1602428611

Flyway vs Liquibase

I believe that there is no need for describing why the usage of database migration tools is vital for modern days apps that utilize relational database engines. I will only say that they can make our life much easier and help us to automatize a complex and repetitive process. Through the course of this article, I will provide some more insights into similarities and differences between two of the most common open-source migration tools, namely Flyway and Liquibase. I will start with quick descriptions of both tools.

Flyway

It is described by its creators, a company called Redgate, as an open-source database migration tool that prefers simplicity and convention over configuration. As of now, it supports most of the currently used database engines, such as Postgres, Oracle, SQL Server, DB2, H2, MariaDB, and many others. It also supports some cloud base database services like Amazon RDS or Google Cloud SQL or Heroku. The script can be written in pure SQL (many dialects are supported) or in Java (mostly for more complex transformations). It has a command line client but it also provides Maven and Gradle plugins. What is more, it has Java API which also works for Android. For those of you who use .NET and C#, there is a Flyway counterpart named Evolve so if you are interested you can check this one up. The link to its GitHub page will be at the end of the article.

Liquibase

It started in 2006 and is an open-source tool for database migrations. It is based on the concept ofchangelogsandchangesetsfiles which can be written in SQL, XML, YAML, JSON. There we store all the changes which we want to make in our database structure. These files can be further used to apply those changes to any other database instance. Liquibase supports subsequent databases: Postgres, Oracle, DB2, H2, MariaDB, SQL Server, SQLite, and many others. Many cloud-based databases are also supported for example Azure SQL, Amazon RDS, Amazon Aurora. You can run Liquibase migration scripts from shell, using build tools such as Maven Gradle or even Ant. Moreover, you can generate pure SQL queries that can be further executed by your DBA-s/Ops/DevOps team or anyone who is taking care of your database.

Now that we described both tools, we can move to describing similarities and differences between them. Let’s start with the similarities between these two tools.

Similarities

  • Both are to some degree open source and provide some part of features for free but also have paid versions that provide more features.
  • Both can use plain old SQL to write your migration scripts.
  • Both are strongly “Java oriented” and also have built in support for basic build tools like Maven or Gradle as well as integration with the most common Java frameworks, for example: Spring Boot.
  • Both can be run as simple shell scripts from command line.
  • The list of supported databases is more or less similar. There can be some minor differences in supported versions or drivers but in general, there are no easily visible differences between them in this area.
  • Both are based on the same approach for handling database changes, namely Migration Based Database Delivery.
  • Both tools try to implement the concept of **Evolutionary database **presented and explained by Martin Fowler (link in the end of the article).

#tools #database #integration #migration #opensource #comparison #discussion #liquibase #flyway

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Flyway vs Liquibase
Autumn  Blick

Autumn Blick

1598839687

How native is React Native? | React Native vs Native App Development

If you are undertaking a mobile app development for your start-up or enterprise, you are likely wondering whether to use React Native. As a popular development framework, React Native helps you to develop near-native mobile apps. However, you are probably also wondering how close you can get to a native app by using React Native. How native is React Native?

In the article, we discuss the similarities between native mobile development and development using React Native. We also touch upon where they differ and how to bridge the gaps. Read on.

A brief introduction to React Native

Let’s briefly set the context first. We will briefly touch upon what React Native is and how it differs from earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is a popular JavaScript framework that Facebook has created. You can use this open-source framework to code natively rendering Android and iOS mobile apps. You can use it to develop web apps too.

Facebook has developed React Native based on React, its JavaScript library. The first release of React Native came in March 2015. At the time of writing this article, the latest stable release of React Native is 0.62.0, and it was released in March 2020.

Although relatively new, React Native has acquired a high degree of popularity. The “Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2019” report identifies it as the 8th most loved framework. Facebook, Walmart, and Bloomberg are some of the top companies that use React Native.

The popularity of React Native comes from its advantages. Some of its advantages are as follows:

  • Performance: It delivers optimal performance.
  • Cross-platform development: You can develop both Android and iOS apps with it. The reuse of code expedites development and reduces costs.
  • UI design: React Native enables you to design simple and responsive UI for your mobile app.
  • 3rd party plugins: This framework supports 3rd party plugins.
  • Developer community: A vibrant community of developers support React Native.

Why React Native is fundamentally different from earlier hybrid frameworks

Are you wondering whether React Native is just another of those hybrid frameworks like Ionic or Cordova? It’s not! React Native is fundamentally different from these earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is very close to native. Consider the following aspects as described on the React Native website:

  • Access to many native platforms features: The primitives of React Native render to native platform UI. This means that your React Native app will use many native platform APIs as native apps would do.
  • Near-native user experience: React Native provides several native components, and these are platform agnostic.
  • The ease of accessing native APIs: React Native uses a declarative UI paradigm. This enables React Native to interact easily with native platform APIs since React Native wraps existing native code.

Due to these factors, React Native offers many more advantages compared to those earlier hybrid frameworks. We now review them.

#android app #frontend #ios app #mobile app development #benefits of react native #is react native good for mobile app development #native vs #pros and cons of react native #react mobile development #react native development #react native experience #react native framework #react native ios vs android #react native pros and cons #react native vs android #react native vs native #react native vs native performance #react vs native #why react native #why use react native

Wiley  Mayer

Wiley Mayer

1602428611

Flyway vs Liquibase

I believe that there is no need for describing why the usage of database migration tools is vital for modern days apps that utilize relational database engines. I will only say that they can make our life much easier and help us to automatize a complex and repetitive process. Through the course of this article, I will provide some more insights into similarities and differences between two of the most common open-source migration tools, namely Flyway and Liquibase. I will start with quick descriptions of both tools.

Flyway

It is described by its creators, a company called Redgate, as an open-source database migration tool that prefers simplicity and convention over configuration. As of now, it supports most of the currently used database engines, such as Postgres, Oracle, SQL Server, DB2, H2, MariaDB, and many others. It also supports some cloud base database services like Amazon RDS or Google Cloud SQL or Heroku. The script can be written in pure SQL (many dialects are supported) or in Java (mostly for more complex transformations). It has a command line client but it also provides Maven and Gradle plugins. What is more, it has Java API which also works for Android. For those of you who use .NET and C#, there is a Flyway counterpart named Evolve so if you are interested you can check this one up. The link to its GitHub page will be at the end of the article.

Liquibase

It started in 2006 and is an open-source tool for database migrations. It is based on the concept ofchangelogsandchangesetsfiles which can be written in SQL, XML, YAML, JSON. There we store all the changes which we want to make in our database structure. These files can be further used to apply those changes to any other database instance. Liquibase supports subsequent databases: Postgres, Oracle, DB2, H2, MariaDB, SQL Server, SQLite, and many others. Many cloud-based databases are also supported for example Azure SQL, Amazon RDS, Amazon Aurora. You can run Liquibase migration scripts from shell, using build tools such as Maven Gradle or even Ant. Moreover, you can generate pure SQL queries that can be further executed by your DBA-s/Ops/DevOps team or anyone who is taking care of your database.

Now that we described both tools, we can move to describing similarities and differences between them. Let’s start with the similarities between these two tools.

Similarities

  • Both are to some degree open source and provide some part of features for free but also have paid versions that provide more features.
  • Both can use plain old SQL to write your migration scripts.
  • Both are strongly “Java oriented” and also have built in support for basic build tools like Maven or Gradle as well as integration with the most common Java frameworks, for example: Spring Boot.
  • Both can be run as simple shell scripts from command line.
  • The list of supported databases is more or less similar. There can be some minor differences in supported versions or drivers but in general, there are no easily visible differences between them in this area.
  • Both are based on the same approach for handling database changes, namely Migration Based Database Delivery.
  • Both tools try to implement the concept of **Evolutionary database **presented and explained by Martin Fowler (link in the end of the article).

#tools #database #integration #migration #opensource #comparison #discussion #liquibase #flyway

PWA vs Native App: Which Is Better Option In 2021?

Every year, the world is expanding with the launch of new smartphones and other gadgets available in the market. According to Statista, more than 50% of the population will be using smartphones by the end of 2021.

Hence, businesses worldwide have understood the importance of smartphones and are joining the mobile industry by launching native apps.

Apart from native apps, progressive web apps is another technology that is gaining a lot of attention among businesses. Moreover, various leading companies worldwide have openly accepted PWA and built progressive web apps.

Now, the question arises, how is PWA different from the native apps? Read More

#pwa vs native #pwa vs native app #progressive web app vs native #progressive web app vs native app #pwa vs native app performance

Whitney  Durgan

Whitney Durgan

1620681120

CockroachDB vs (MySQL, PostgreSQL, MongoDB & Cassandra)

An introduction to CockroachDB

If you are an entrepreneur or an enterprise IT leader, then you need to plan the technology stack for your software development project. You need to choose the right database for your project. If you are developing a heavy-duty transaction processing system or a high-demand analytics system, you will likely use an RDBMS (Relational Database Management System). You can choose one from several popular RDBMSs.

However, do you want an assurance that your data in an RDBMS will survive even large-scale failures in application systems and servers? This narrows the choice. This is where CockroachDB becomes important. This relatively new RDBMS offers a high degree of survivability to your data. In this article, we review CockroachDB and its features. We assess its pros and cons. Subsequently, we review its use cases. Finally, we compare CockroachDB with some of the popular databases. Read on.

#cockroachdb vs cassandra #cockroachdb vs mongodb #cockroachdb vs mysql #cockroachdb vs postgres #mysql

Firebase Vs MongoDB Stitch Vs AWS Amplify Vs Azure Mobile Apps

Are you an entrepreneur or an IT manager undertaking a mobile app development? You would probably like to focus more on the front-end. That’s natural since the front-end of the app influences the user experience. Having said that, you can’t cut corners as far as the mobile backend is considered. Building and maintaining a mobile backend takes time and effort. It involves complexities. This is where a “Mobile Backend-as-a-Service” (MBaaS) platform can help. There are several MBaaS platforms though, and you might find it hard to choose one. This comparison between Firebase vs MongoDB Stitch vs AWS amplify vs Azure Mobile Apps can help.

In this comparison, we briefly understand what MBaaS platforms are. We review their pros and cons. We review the above-mentioned MBaaS platforms and compare them. Finally, we analyze when to use any one of these MBaaS platforms.

An introduction to MBaaS

Why should you explore “Mobile Backend-as-a-Service” (MBaaS) platforms and what are they? What advantages do they offer? Would you face any limitations in your mobile development project due to using an MBaaS? We now address these questions, which will set the context.

A brief summary of various cloud computing models

Before delving into MBaaS, let’s briefly recap the various “as-a-service” models that cloud computing has spawned. We typically talk about 3 types of cloud computing models:

  • Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS): A managed cloud service provider (MCSP) provides the computing infrastructure only on the cloud. The organization or developer consuming it brings everything else. Amazon EC2 (Elastic Compute Cloud) is an example of IaaS.
  • Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS): The MCSP provides the cloud infrastructure, operating system, middleware, runtime environment, and services like databases. The consumer brings the application and data. AWS Elastic Beanstalk is a PaaS.
  • Software-as-a-Service (SaaS): A software provider offers the entire software on the cloud. Consumers buy a subscription to use the software, and they don’t need to install anything. Gmail is an example of SaaS.

An MBaaS platform is closer to a PaaS platform, and we will see how.

#amplify vs firebase #firebase vs amplify #firebase vs aws