Dexter  Goodwin

Dexter Goodwin

1635367740

Learn All The JavaScript You Need To Learn Before React

We have all been at this stage. You have just finished an online course or other self-taught resources and have some grip over JavaScript and now the obvious choice is to learn some JavaScript framework. But approaching your first js framework can get really scary. But I beg you to not stop there, we all once had that doubt that we are not ready yet, it is something every developer goes through.

In this post, I will make your transition to the React framework a lot easier. As I have listed down the most used JavaScript concepts used inside React Js.

#react #javascript 

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Learn All The JavaScript You Need To Learn Before React
Autumn  Blick

Autumn Blick

1598839687

How native is React Native? | React Native vs Native App Development

If you are undertaking a mobile app development for your start-up or enterprise, you are likely wondering whether to use React Native. As a popular development framework, React Native helps you to develop near-native mobile apps. However, you are probably also wondering how close you can get to a native app by using React Native. How native is React Native?

In the article, we discuss the similarities between native mobile development and development using React Native. We also touch upon where they differ and how to bridge the gaps. Read on.

A brief introduction to React Native

Let’s briefly set the context first. We will briefly touch upon what React Native is and how it differs from earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is a popular JavaScript framework that Facebook has created. You can use this open-source framework to code natively rendering Android and iOS mobile apps. You can use it to develop web apps too.

Facebook has developed React Native based on React, its JavaScript library. The first release of React Native came in March 2015. At the time of writing this article, the latest stable release of React Native is 0.62.0, and it was released in March 2020.

Although relatively new, React Native has acquired a high degree of popularity. The “Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2019” report identifies it as the 8th most loved framework. Facebook, Walmart, and Bloomberg are some of the top companies that use React Native.

The popularity of React Native comes from its advantages. Some of its advantages are as follows:

  • Performance: It delivers optimal performance.
  • Cross-platform development: You can develop both Android and iOS apps with it. The reuse of code expedites development and reduces costs.
  • UI design: React Native enables you to design simple and responsive UI for your mobile app.
  • 3rd party plugins: This framework supports 3rd party plugins.
  • Developer community: A vibrant community of developers support React Native.

Why React Native is fundamentally different from earlier hybrid frameworks

Are you wondering whether React Native is just another of those hybrid frameworks like Ionic or Cordova? It’s not! React Native is fundamentally different from these earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is very close to native. Consider the following aspects as described on the React Native website:

  • Access to many native platforms features: The primitives of React Native render to native platform UI. This means that your React Native app will use many native platform APIs as native apps would do.
  • Near-native user experience: React Native provides several native components, and these are platform agnostic.
  • The ease of accessing native APIs: React Native uses a declarative UI paradigm. This enables React Native to interact easily with native platform APIs since React Native wraps existing native code.

Due to these factors, React Native offers many more advantages compared to those earlier hybrid frameworks. We now review them.

#android app #frontend #ios app #mobile app development #benefits of react native #is react native good for mobile app development #native vs #pros and cons of react native #react mobile development #react native development #react native experience #react native framework #react native ios vs android #react native pros and cons #react native vs android #react native vs native #react native vs native performance #react vs native #why react native #why use react native

Sival Alethea

Sival Alethea

1624298400

Learn JavaScript - Full Course for Beginners. DO NOT MISS!!!

This complete 134-part JavaScript tutorial for beginners will teach you everything you need to know to get started with the JavaScript programming language.
⭐️Course Contents⭐️
0:00:00 Introduction
0:01:24 Running JavaScript
0:04:23 Comment Your Code
0:05:56 Declare Variables
0:06:15 Storing Values with the Assignment Operator
0:11:31 Initializing Variables with the Assignment Operator
0:11:58 Uninitialized Variables
0:12:40 Case Sensitivity in Variables
0:14:05 Add Two Numbers
0:14:34 Subtract One Number from Another
0:14:52 Multiply Two Numbers
0:15:12 Dividing Numbers
0:15:30 Increment
0:15:58 Decrement
0:16:22 Decimal Numbers
0:16:48 Multiply Two Decimals
0:17:18 Divide Decimals
0:17:33 Finding a Remainder
0:18:22 Augmented Addition
0:19:22 Augmented Subtraction
0:20:18 Augmented Multiplication
0:20:51 Augmented Division
0:21:19 Declare String Variables
0:22:01 Escaping Literal Quotes
0:23:44 Quoting Strings with Single Quotes
0:25:18 Escape Sequences
0:26:46 Plus Operator
0:27:49 Plus Equals Operator
0:29:01 Constructing Strings with Variables
0:30:14 Appending Variables to Strings
0:31:11 Length of a String
0:32:01 Bracket Notation
0:33:27 Understand String Immutability
0:34:23 Find the Nth Character
0:34:51 Find the Last Character
0:35:48 Find the Nth-to-Last Character
0:36:28 Word Blanks
0:40:44 Arrays
0:41:43 Nest Arrays
0:42:33 Access Array Data
0:43:34 Modify Array Data
0:44:48 Access Multi-Dimensional Arrays
0:46:30 push()
0:47:29 pop()
0:48:33 shift()
0:49:23 unshift()
0:50:36 Shopping List
0:51:41 Write Reusable with Functions
0:53:41 Arguments
0:55:43 Global Scope
0:59:31 Local Scope
1:00:46 Global vs Local Scope in Functions
1:02:40 Return a Value from a Function
1:03:55 Undefined Value returned
1:04:52 Assignment with a Returned Value
1:05:52 Stand in Line
1:08:41 Boolean Values
1:09:24 If Statements
1:11:51 Equality Operator
1:13:18 Strict Equality Operator
1:14:43 Comparing different values
1:15:38 Inequality Operator
1:16:20 Strict Inequality Operator
1:17:05 Greater Than Operator
1:17:39 Greater Than Or Equal To Operator
1:18:09 Less Than Operator
1:18:44 Less Than Or Equal To Operator
1:19:17 And Operator
1:20:41 Or Operator
1:21:37 Else Statements
1:22:27 Else If Statements
1:23:30 Logical Order in If Else Statements
1:24:45 Chaining If Else Statements
1:27:45 Golf Code
1:32:15 Switch Statements
1:35:46 Default Option in Switch Statements
1:37:23 Identical Options in Switch Statements
1:39:20 Replacing If Else Chains with Switch
1:41:11 Returning Boolean Values from Functions
1:42:20 Return Early Pattern for Functions
1:43:38 Counting Cards
1:49:11 Build Objects
1:50:46 Dot Notation
1:51:33 Bracket Notation
1:52:47 Variables
1:53:34 Updating Object Properties
1:54:30 Add New Properties to Object
1:55:19 Delete Properties from Object
1:55:54 Objects for Lookups
1:57:43 Testing Objects for Properties
1:59:15 Manipulating Complex Objects
2:01:00 Nested Objects
2:01:53 Nested Arrays
2:03:06 Record Collection
2:10:15 While Loops
2:11:35 For Loops
2:13:56 Odd Numbers With a For Loop
2:15:28 Count Backwards With a For Loop
2:17:08 Iterate Through an Array with a For Loop
2:19:43 Nesting For Loops
2:22:45 Do…While Loops
2:24:12 Profile Lookup
2:28:18 Random Fractions
2:28:54 Random Whole Numbers
2:30:21 Random Whole Numbers within a Range
2:31:46 parseInt Function
2:32:36 parseInt Function with a Radix
2:33:29 Ternary Operator
2:34:57 Multiple Ternary Operators
2:36:57 var vs let
2:39:02 var vs let scopes
2:41:32 const Keyword
2:43:40 Mutate an Array Declared with const
2:44:52 Prevent Object Mutation
2:47:17 Arrow Functions
2:28:24 Arrow Functions with Parameters
2:49:27 Higher Order Arrow Functions
2:53:04 Default Parameters
2:54:00 Rest Operator
2:55:31 Spread Operator
2:57:18 Destructuring Assignment: Objects
3:00:18 Destructuring Assignment: Nested Objects
3:01:55 Destructuring Assignment: Arrays
3:03:40 Destructuring Assignment with Rest Operator to Reassign Array
3:05:05 Destructuring Assignment to Pass an Object
3:06:39 Template Literals
3:10:43 Simple Fields
3:12:24 Declarative Functions
3:12:56 class Syntax
3:15:11 getters and setters
3:20:25 import vs require
3:22:33 export
3:23:40 * to Import
3:24:50 export default
3:25:26 Import a Default Export
📺 The video in this post was made by freeCodeCamp.org
The origin of the article: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PkZNo7MFNFg&list=PLWKjhJtqVAblfum5WiQblKPwIbqYXkDoC&index=4

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#javascript #learn javascript #learn javascript for beginners #learn javascript - full course for beginners #javascript programming language

12 Fun Challenges to Learn React Native

So you want to learn React Native? Here’s 12 exercises to that will help you do that.

The post is inspired by a free self-paced workshop I’ve created. If you’re interested in guided instructions, solutions, and extra exercises check it out!

Exercise 1: Hello, World!

The classic starter project. Render a square with a background color. Inside of the square render the text “Hello, world”.

Helpful Links

Exercise 2: Capturing Taps

An app isn’t much if a user can’t interact with it. The most basic form of interaction is capturing a user’s tap (or press) on a screen. Using the

Buttoncomponent, capture a tap event andalert"hello".

#react-native #mobile-app-development #beginners #react #javascript #learn-react-native #programming #learn-to-code

Learning JavaScript: Working with Strings

Strings are the second most common data type used in JavaScript, and in many cases, since JavaScript is so widely used for web applications, it is the prominent data type. In this article I’ll discuss how strings work in JavaScript and how to work with them efficiently and effectively. I’ll also discuss some newer abilities of strings that are just being discovered and used.

Strings Defined

A string is any set of 0 or more characters enclosed in either single quotes or double quotes. The characters in a string can be alphabetic characters, numbers, symbols, and spaces. Here are some examples of JavaScript string literals:

"hello world"
'good bye, world!'
"1600 Pennsylvania Avenue"
'$*&!@ it!'

If you are using single quotes in your string, and you need to embed a single quote to write out a contraction, you use the backslash character (\) as an escape character. To see why you need to do this, let’s look at what happens when you don’t escape a single quote by writing out such a string in the JavaScript shell:

js> 'can't'
typein:1:5 SyntaxError: unexpected token: identifier:
typein:1:5 'can't'
typein:1:5 .....^

The interpreter can’t figure out what to do with the ‘t’ after the single quote.

Now watch what happens when we escape the single quote:

js> 'can\'t'
"can't"

The escape character tells the interpreter to treat the single quote as an apostrophe and not as an “end-of-string” character.

You can embed other characters into a string, including the newline character (\n) and the tab character (\t). Here are some examples using the shell:

js> print("Hello, \n world!");
Hello,
world!
js> print("Hello, \tworld");
Hello,  world

#javascript-training #learn-to-code #learn-to-program #javascript #javascript-tutorial #deep learning

Learning JavaScript: Computing with Object Methods

JavaScript has a set of built-in methods you can use with your user-defined objects. In this article I’m going to discuss several of these methods and how you can use them in your JavaScript programs.

Object.assign

The Object.assign method is used to make a copy of one object into another object. The syntax template for this method is:

Object.assign(target, source);

where source is the object you are copying from and target is the object you are copying into. This method returns the target object if you want to assign it.

Here is a sample program that demonstrates how to use Object.assign:

function Student(name, id, grades) {
  this.name = name;
  this.id = id;
  this.grades = grades;
}
let st1 = new Student("",0,[]);
et st2 = new Student("Jane Doe", 123, [91, 92, 93]);
Object.assign(st1, st2);
print(`${st1.name}, ${st1.id}\n[${st1.grades}]`);

The output from this program is:

Jane Doe, 123
[91, 92, 93]

A good reason to use this method is to make sure that a new object has all the properties and values of the old object. You may accidentally leave something out when writing your own method, while Object.assign will systematically make sure all properties and values are assigned to the new object.

Object.create

The Object.create method creates a new object from an existing object prototype. Here is the syntax template for this method:

const|let|var object-name = Object.create(existing-object);

Let’s look at a few examples to see how this method works in practice. The first example creates a new object from a function and then creates a second object using Object.create:

function Student(name, id, grades) {
  this.name = name;
  this.id = id;
  this.grades = grades;
}
let st1 = new Student("Bob Green", 1234, [81, 77, 92]);
print(`${st1.name}, ${st1.id}\n${st1.grades}`);
let st2 = Object.create(st1);
print(`${st2.name}, ${st2.id}\n${st2.grades}`);

The output from this program is:

Bob Green, 1234
81,77,92
Bob Green, 1234
81,77,92

Code must be written to change the properties of the newly created object.

#learn-to-code #javascript-development #learn-to-program #javascript #learning-javascript