Vegard  Sandnes

Vegard Sandnes

1604281858

How to Build a Rich Text Editor in React with SlateJS

Building an awesome editor for your React-based web application is by no means easy. But with  SlateJS things get much easier. Even with the help of Slate, building a full-featured editor is way more work than we can cover in one blog post, so this post will give you the big picture and subsequent posts will dive into the dirty details.

Note: this post is based on a recent talk at the JavaScript NYC meetup. You can watch the video here:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wLjx67aNEMI

SlateJS

We’re building  Kitemaker, a new, fast, and highly collaborative alternative to issue trackers like Jira, Trello, and Clubhouse. We’re big believers in remote work, and in particular working asynchronously so that team members get large, uninterrupted blocks of time to get work done. A key to supporting this type of work is having a really great editor so that teams are inspired to collaborate together on issues and ensure alignment. And we think we’ve got the best editor around:

Markdown shortcuts, code blocks with syntax highlighting, images, embedding designs from  Figma, math expressions with LaTex, diagrams with  MermaidJS, and, of course, emojis ♥️. All done entirely with Slate.

So why did we choose to go with Slate in the first place? It’s definitely not the only editor framework out there. For us, the things that pushed us towards Slate were:

  • It’s un-opinionated about how your document is structured, and that gave us the flexibility we needed
  • It doesn’t force any built-in toolbars or any other visuals upon you
  • It’s built with React in mind and that makes a huge difference when rendering complex documents
  • It lays the foundation for collaborative editing which is something we believe is important for Kitemaker
  • We really like  the philosophy behind it
  • It has a thriving community, particularly on  Slack

#react #slatejs #javascript

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How to Build a Rich Text Editor in React with SlateJS
Autumn  Blick

Autumn Blick

1598839687

How native is React Native? | React Native vs Native App Development

If you are undertaking a mobile app development for your start-up or enterprise, you are likely wondering whether to use React Native. As a popular development framework, React Native helps you to develop near-native mobile apps. However, you are probably also wondering how close you can get to a native app by using React Native. How native is React Native?

In the article, we discuss the similarities between native mobile development and development using React Native. We also touch upon where they differ and how to bridge the gaps. Read on.

A brief introduction to React Native

Let’s briefly set the context first. We will briefly touch upon what React Native is and how it differs from earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is a popular JavaScript framework that Facebook has created. You can use this open-source framework to code natively rendering Android and iOS mobile apps. You can use it to develop web apps too.

Facebook has developed React Native based on React, its JavaScript library. The first release of React Native came in March 2015. At the time of writing this article, the latest stable release of React Native is 0.62.0, and it was released in March 2020.

Although relatively new, React Native has acquired a high degree of popularity. The “Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2019” report identifies it as the 8th most loved framework. Facebook, Walmart, and Bloomberg are some of the top companies that use React Native.

The popularity of React Native comes from its advantages. Some of its advantages are as follows:

  • Performance: It delivers optimal performance.
  • Cross-platform development: You can develop both Android and iOS apps with it. The reuse of code expedites development and reduces costs.
  • UI design: React Native enables you to design simple and responsive UI for your mobile app.
  • 3rd party plugins: This framework supports 3rd party plugins.
  • Developer community: A vibrant community of developers support React Native.

Why React Native is fundamentally different from earlier hybrid frameworks

Are you wondering whether React Native is just another of those hybrid frameworks like Ionic or Cordova? It’s not! React Native is fundamentally different from these earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is very close to native. Consider the following aspects as described on the React Native website:

  • Access to many native platforms features: The primitives of React Native render to native platform UI. This means that your React Native app will use many native platform APIs as native apps would do.
  • Near-native user experience: React Native provides several native components, and these are platform agnostic.
  • The ease of accessing native APIs: React Native uses a declarative UI paradigm. This enables React Native to interact easily with native platform APIs since React Native wraps existing native code.

Due to these factors, React Native offers many more advantages compared to those earlier hybrid frameworks. We now review them.

#android app #frontend #ios app #mobile app development #benefits of react native #is react native good for mobile app development #native vs #pros and cons of react native #react mobile development #react native development #react native experience #react native framework #react native ios vs android #react native pros and cons #react native vs android #react native vs native #react native vs native performance #react vs native #why react native #why use react native

Myriam  Rogahn

Myriam Rogahn

1598408100

How to Use Syncfusion’s React Rich Text Editor with React Redux Form

The Syncfusion React Rich Text Editor component is a WYSIWYG editor component that can be used to frame a UI form control. It works seamlessly with React Redux Form and can validate inputs in form fields.

This blog explains the procedure to merge our Rich Text Editor component with Redux Form fields to validate inputs. The following topics are covered in this blog:

What is Redux Form?

Redux is an open-source JavaScript library. It is used to develop UI components in React and Angular platforms. redux -form is a validation library that can be integrated into any React web application easily. It uses the Redux library to store field input values and higher-order components.

Refer to the redux-form documentation page to get more information.

Now, let’s see how to create a React app with Redux and integrate our React Rich Text Editor within it.

Getting started with create-react-app

To create a React application, follow these steps:

Step 1: Use the create-react-app command to install the NuGet package globally that we will use to create a basic React application.

npm i create-react-app -g

You can create the app in any directory by using the create-react-app command.

Step 2: Move to the directory where you want to create the application and run the following command. Here, I am naming this app RichTextEditor-Redux-Form.

create-react-app RichTextEditor-Redux-Form

Thus, we have created the application.

#essential js 2 #react #rich text editor #web #javascript #react rich text editor

Navigating Between DOM Nodes in JavaScript

In the previous chapters you've learnt how to select individual elements on a web page. But there are many occasions where you need to access a child, parent or ancestor element. See the JavaScript DOM nodes chapter to understand the logical relationships between the nodes in a DOM tree.

DOM node provides several properties and methods that allow you to navigate or traverse through the tree structure of the DOM and make changes very easily. In the following section we will learn how to navigate up, down, and sideways in the DOM tree using JavaScript.

Accessing the Child Nodes

You can use the firstChild and lastChild properties of the DOM node to access the first and last direct child node of a node, respectively. If the node doesn't have any child element, it returns null.

Example

<div id="main">
    <h1 id="title">My Heading</h1>
    <p id="hint"><span>This is some text.</span></p>
</div>

<script>
var main = document.getElementById("main");
console.log(main.firstChild.nodeName); // Prints: #text

var hint = document.getElementById("hint");
console.log(hint.firstChild.nodeName); // Prints: SPAN
</script>

Note: The nodeName is a read-only property that returns the name of the current node as a string. For example, it returns the tag name for element node, #text for text node, #comment for comment node, #document for document node, and so on.

If you notice the above example, the nodeName of the first-child node of the main DIV element returns #text instead of H1. Because, whitespace such as spaces, tabs, newlines, etc. are valid characters and they form #text nodes and become a part of the DOM tree. Therefore, since the <div> tag contains a newline before the <h1> tag, so it will create a #text node.

To avoid the issue with firstChild and lastChild returning #text or #comment nodes, you could alternatively use the firstElementChild and lastElementChild properties to return only the first and last element node, respectively. But, it will not work in IE 9 and earlier.

Example

<div id="main">
    <h1 id="title">My Heading</h1>
    <p id="hint"><span>This is some text.</span></p>
</div>

<script>
var main = document.getElementById("main");
alert(main.firstElementChild.nodeName); // Outputs: H1
main.firstElementChild.style.color = "red";

var hint = document.getElementById("hint");
alert(hint.firstElementChild.nodeName); // Outputs: SPAN
hint.firstElementChild.style.color = "blue";
</script>

Similarly, you can use the childNodes property to access all child nodes of a given element, where the first child node is assigned index 0. Here's an example:

Example

<div id="main">
    <h1 id="title">My Heading</h1>
    <p id="hint"><span>This is some text.</span></p>
</div>

<script>
var main = document.getElementById("main");

// First check that the element has child nodes 
if(main.hasChildNodes()) {
    var nodes = main.childNodes;
    
    // Loop through node list and display node name
    for(var i = 0; i < nodes.length; i++) {
        alert(nodes[i].nodeName);
    }
}
</script>

The childNodes returns all child nodes, including non-element nodes like text and comment nodes. To get a collection of only elements, use children property instead.

Example

<div id="main">
    <h1 id="title">My Heading</h1>
    <p id="hint"><span>This is some text.</span></p>
</div>

<script>
var main = document.getElementById("main");

// First check that the element has child nodes 
if(main.hasChildNodes()) {
    var nodes = main.children;
    
    // Loop through node list and display node name
    for(var i = 0; i < nodes.length; i++) {
        alert(nodes[i].nodeName);
    }
}
</script>

#javascript 

Franz  Becker

Franz Becker

1651604400

React Starter Kit: Build Web Apps with React, Relay and GraphQL.

React Starter Kit — "isomorphic" web app boilerplate   

React Starter Kit is an opinionated boilerplate for web development built on top of Node.js, Express, GraphQL and React, containing modern web development tools such as Webpack, Babel and Browsersync. Helping you to stay productive following the best practices. A solid starting point for both professionals and newcomers to the industry.

See getting started guide, demo, docs, roadmap  |  Join #react-starter-kit chat room on Gitter  |  Visit our sponsors:

 

Hiring

Getting Started

Customization

The master branch of React Starter Kit doesn't include a Flux implementation or any other advanced integrations. Nevertheless, we have some integrations available to you in feature branches that you can use either as a reference or merge into your project:

You can see status of most reasonable merge combination as PRs labeled as TRACKING

If you think that any of these features should be on master, or vice versa, some features should removed from the master branch, please let us know. We love your feedback!

Comparison

 

React Starter Kit

React Static Boilerplate

ASP.NET Core Starter Kit

App typeIsomorphic (universal)Single-page applicationSingle-page application
Frontend
LanguageJavaScript (ES2015+, JSX)JavaScript (ES2015+, JSX)JavaScript (ES2015+, JSX)
LibrariesReact, History, Universal RouterReact, History, ReduxReact, History, Redux
RoutesImperative (functional)DeclarativeDeclarative, cross-stack
Backend
LanguageJavaScript (ES2015+, JSX)n/aC#, F#
LibrariesNode.js, Express, Sequelize,
GraphQL
n/aASP.NET Core, EF Core,
ASP.NET Identity
SSRYesn/an/a
Data APIGraphQLn/aWeb API

Backers

♥ React Starter Kit? Help us keep it alive by donating funds to cover project expenses via OpenCollective or Bountysource!

lehneres Tarkan Anlar Morten Olsen Adam David Ernst Zane Hitchcox  

How to Contribute

Anyone and everyone is welcome to contribute to this project. The best way to start is by checking our open issues, submit a new issue or feature request, participate in discussions, upvote or downvote the issues you like or dislike, send pull requests.

Learn More

Related Projects

  • GraphQL Starter Kit — Boilerplate for building data APIs with Node.js, JavaScript (via Babel) and GraphQL
  • Membership Database — SQL schema boilerplate for user accounts, profiles, roles, and auth claims
  • Babel Starter Kit — Boilerplate for authoring JavaScript/React.js libraries

Support

License

Copyright © 2014-present Kriasoft, LLC. This source code is licensed under the MIT license found in the LICENSE.txt file. The documentation to the project is licensed under the CC BY-SA 4.0 license.


Author: kriasoft
Source Code: https://github.com/kriasoft/react-starter-kit
License: MIT License

#graphql #react