Roscoe  Batz

Roscoe Batz

1628964000

How to use Live Characters and Words Counter using JavaScript

In this video we are going to learn how to create character and words counter using HTML CSS and JavaScript.

Timestamps :
00:00 Intro & Demo
01:01 Project Setup
01:59 Adding HTML
03:50 Adding CSS
11:17 Adding JavaScript
17:17 Testing & End

#javascript 

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Buddha Community

How to use Live Characters and Words Counter using JavaScript
Chloe  Butler

Chloe Butler

1667425440

Pdf2gerb: Perl Script Converts PDF Files to Gerber format

pdf2gerb

Perl script converts PDF files to Gerber format

Pdf2Gerb generates Gerber 274X photoplotting and Excellon drill files from PDFs of a PCB. Up to three PDFs are used: the top copper layer, the bottom copper layer (for 2-sided PCBs), and an optional silk screen layer. The PDFs can be created directly from any PDF drawing software, or a PDF print driver can be used to capture the Print output if the drawing software does not directly support output to PDF.

The general workflow is as follows:

  1. Design the PCB using your favorite CAD or drawing software.
  2. Print the top and bottom copper and top silk screen layers to a PDF file.
  3. Run Pdf2Gerb on the PDFs to create Gerber and Excellon files.
  4. Use a Gerber viewer to double-check the output against the original PCB design.
  5. Make adjustments as needed.
  6. Submit the files to a PCB manufacturer.

Please note that Pdf2Gerb does NOT perform DRC (Design Rule Checks), as these will vary according to individual PCB manufacturer conventions and capabilities. Also note that Pdf2Gerb is not perfect, so the output files must always be checked before submitting them. As of version 1.6, Pdf2Gerb supports most PCB elements, such as round and square pads, round holes, traces, SMD pads, ground planes, no-fill areas, and panelization. However, because it interprets the graphical output of a Print function, there are limitations in what it can recognize (or there may be bugs).

See docs/Pdf2Gerb.pdf for install/setup, config, usage, and other info.


pdf2gerb_cfg.pm

#Pdf2Gerb config settings:
#Put this file in same folder/directory as pdf2gerb.pl itself (global settings),
#or copy to another folder/directory with PDFs if you want PCB-specific settings.
#There is only one user of this file, so we don't need a custom package or namespace.
#NOTE: all constants defined in here will be added to main namespace.
#package pdf2gerb_cfg;

use strict; #trap undef vars (easier debug)
use warnings; #other useful info (easier debug)


##############################################################################################
#configurable settings:
#change values here instead of in main pfg2gerb.pl file

use constant WANT_COLORS => ($^O !~ m/Win/); #ANSI colors no worky on Windows? this must be set < first DebugPrint() call

#just a little warning; set realistic expectations:
#DebugPrint("${\(CYAN)}Pdf2Gerb.pl ${\(VERSION)}, $^O O/S\n${\(YELLOW)}${\(BOLD)}${\(ITALIC)}This is EXPERIMENTAL software.  \nGerber files MAY CONTAIN ERRORS.  Please CHECK them before fabrication!${\(RESET)}", 0); #if WANT_DEBUG

use constant METRIC => FALSE; #set to TRUE for metric units (only affect final numbers in output files, not internal arithmetic)
use constant APERTURE_LIMIT => 0; #34; #max #apertures to use; generate warnings if too many apertures are used (0 to not check)
use constant DRILL_FMT => '2.4'; #'2.3'; #'2.4' is the default for PCB fab; change to '2.3' for CNC

use constant WANT_DEBUG => 0; #10; #level of debug wanted; higher == more, lower == less, 0 == none
use constant GERBER_DEBUG => 0; #level of debug to include in Gerber file; DON'T USE FOR FABRICATION
use constant WANT_STREAMS => FALSE; #TRUE; #save decompressed streams to files (for debug)
use constant WANT_ALLINPUT => FALSE; #TRUE; #save entire input stream (for debug ONLY)

#DebugPrint(sprintf("${\(CYAN)}DEBUG: stdout %d, gerber %d, want streams? %d, all input? %d, O/S: $^O, Perl: $]${\(RESET)}\n", WANT_DEBUG, GERBER_DEBUG, WANT_STREAMS, WANT_ALLINPUT), 1);
#DebugPrint(sprintf("max int = %d, min int = %d\n", MAXINT, MININT), 1); 

#define standard trace and pad sizes to reduce scaling or PDF rendering errors:
#This avoids weird aperture settings and replaces them with more standardized values.
#(I'm not sure how photoplotters handle strange sizes).
#Fewer choices here gives more accurate mapping in the final Gerber files.
#units are in inches
use constant TOOL_SIZES => #add more as desired
(
#round or square pads (> 0) and drills (< 0):
    .010, -.001,  #tiny pads for SMD; dummy drill size (too small for practical use, but needed so StandardTool will use this entry)
    .031, -.014,  #used for vias
    .041, -.020,  #smallest non-filled plated hole
    .051, -.025,
    .056, -.029,  #useful for IC pins
    .070, -.033,
    .075, -.040,  #heavier leads
#    .090, -.043,  #NOTE: 600 dpi is not high enough resolution to reliably distinguish between .043" and .046", so choose 1 of the 2 here
    .100, -.046,
    .115, -.052,
    .130, -.061,
    .140, -.067,
    .150, -.079,
    .175, -.088,
    .190, -.093,
    .200, -.100,
    .220, -.110,
    .160, -.125,  #useful for mounting holes
#some additional pad sizes without holes (repeat a previous hole size if you just want the pad size):
    .090, -.040,  #want a .090 pad option, but use dummy hole size
    .065, -.040, #.065 x .065 rect pad
    .035, -.040, #.035 x .065 rect pad
#traces:
    .001,  #too thin for real traces; use only for board outlines
    .006,  #minimum real trace width; mainly used for text
    .008,  #mainly used for mid-sized text, not traces
    .010,  #minimum recommended trace width for low-current signals
    .012,
    .015,  #moderate low-voltage current
    .020,  #heavier trace for power, ground (even if a lighter one is adequate)
    .025,
    .030,  #heavy-current traces; be careful with these ones!
    .040,
    .050,
    .060,
    .080,
    .100,
    .120,
);
#Areas larger than the values below will be filled with parallel lines:
#This cuts down on the number of aperture sizes used.
#Set to 0 to always use an aperture or drill, regardless of size.
use constant { MAX_APERTURE => max((TOOL_SIZES)) + .004, MAX_DRILL => -min((TOOL_SIZES)) + .004 }; #max aperture and drill sizes (plus a little tolerance)
#DebugPrint(sprintf("using %d standard tool sizes: %s, max aper %.3f, max drill %.3f\n", scalar((TOOL_SIZES)), join(", ", (TOOL_SIZES)), MAX_APERTURE, MAX_DRILL), 1);

#NOTE: Compare the PDF to the original CAD file to check the accuracy of the PDF rendering and parsing!
#for example, the CAD software I used generated the following circles for holes:
#CAD hole size:   parsed PDF diameter:      error:
#  .014                .016                +.002
#  .020                .02267              +.00267
#  .025                .026                +.001
#  .029                .03167              +.00267
#  .033                .036                +.003
#  .040                .04267              +.00267
#This was usually ~ .002" - .003" too big compared to the hole as displayed in the CAD software.
#To compensate for PDF rendering errors (either during CAD Print function or PDF parsing logic), adjust the values below as needed.
#units are pixels; for example, a value of 2.4 at 600 dpi = .0004 inch, 2 at 600 dpi = .0033"
use constant
{
    HOLE_ADJUST => -0.004 * 600, #-2.6, #holes seemed to be slightly oversized (by .002" - .004"), so shrink them a little
    RNDPAD_ADJUST => -0.003 * 600, #-2, #-2.4, #round pads seemed to be slightly oversized, so shrink them a little
    SQRPAD_ADJUST => +0.001 * 600, #+.5, #square pads are sometimes too small by .00067, so bump them up a little
    RECTPAD_ADJUST => 0, #(pixels) rectangular pads seem to be okay? (not tested much)
    TRACE_ADJUST => 0, #(pixels) traces seemed to be okay?
    REDUCE_TOLERANCE => .001, #(inches) allow this much variation when reducing circles and rects
};

#Also, my CAD's Print function or the PDF print driver I used was a little off for circles, so define some additional adjustment values here:
#Values are added to X/Y coordinates; units are pixels; for example, a value of 1 at 600 dpi would be ~= .002 inch
use constant
{
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MINX => 0,
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MINY => -0.001 * 600, #-1, #circles were a little too high, so nudge them a little lower
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MAXX => +0.001 * 600, #+1, #circles were a little too far to the left, so nudge them a little to the right
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MAXY => 0,
    SUBST_CIRCLE_CLIPRECT => FALSE, #generate circle and substitute for clip rects (to compensate for the way some CAD software draws circles)
    WANT_CLIPRECT => TRUE, #FALSE, #AI doesn't need clip rect at all? should be on normally?
    RECT_COMPLETION => FALSE, #TRUE, #fill in 4th side of rect when 3 sides found
};

#allow .012 clearance around pads for solder mask:
#This value effectively adjusts pad sizes in the TOOL_SIZES list above (only for solder mask layers).
use constant SOLDER_MARGIN => +.012; #units are inches

#line join/cap styles:
use constant
{
    CAP_NONE => 0, #butt (none); line is exact length
    CAP_ROUND => 1, #round cap/join; line overhangs by a semi-circle at either end
    CAP_SQUARE => 2, #square cap/join; line overhangs by a half square on either end
    CAP_OVERRIDE => FALSE, #cap style overrides drawing logic
};
    
#number of elements in each shape type:
use constant
{
    RECT_SHAPELEN => 6, #x0, y0, x1, y1, count, "rect" (start, end corners)
    LINE_SHAPELEN => 6, #x0, y0, x1, y1, count, "line" (line seg)
    CURVE_SHAPELEN => 10, #xstart, ystart, x0, y0, x1, y1, xend, yend, count, "curve" (bezier 2 points)
    CIRCLE_SHAPELEN => 5, #x, y, 5, count, "circle" (center + radius)
};
#const my %SHAPELEN =
#Readonly my %SHAPELEN =>
our %SHAPELEN =
(
    rect => RECT_SHAPELEN,
    line => LINE_SHAPELEN,
    curve => CURVE_SHAPELEN,
    circle => CIRCLE_SHAPELEN,
);

#panelization:
#This will repeat the entire body the number of times indicated along the X or Y axes (files grow accordingly).
#Display elements that overhang PCB boundary can be squashed or left as-is (typically text or other silk screen markings).
#Set "overhangs" TRUE to allow overhangs, FALSE to truncate them.
#xpad and ypad allow margins to be added around outer edge of panelized PCB.
use constant PANELIZE => {'x' => 1, 'y' => 1, 'xpad' => 0, 'ypad' => 0, 'overhangs' => TRUE}; #number of times to repeat in X and Y directions

# Set this to 1 if you need TurboCAD support.
#$turboCAD = FALSE; #is this still needed as an option?

#CIRCAD pad generation uses an appropriate aperture, then moves it (stroke) "a little" - we use this to find pads and distinguish them from PCB holes. 
use constant PAD_STROKE => 0.3; #0.0005 * 600; #units are pixels
#convert very short traces to pads or holes:
use constant TRACE_MINLEN => .001; #units are inches
#use constant ALWAYS_XY => TRUE; #FALSE; #force XY even if X or Y doesn't change; NOTE: needs to be TRUE for all pads to show in FlatCAM and ViewPlot
use constant REMOVE_POLARITY => FALSE; #TRUE; #set to remove subtractive (negative) polarity; NOTE: must be FALSE for ground planes

#PDF uses "points", each point = 1/72 inch
#combined with a PDF scale factor of .12, this gives 600 dpi resolution (1/72 * .12 = 600 dpi)
use constant INCHES_PER_POINT => 1/72; #0.0138888889; #multiply point-size by this to get inches

# The precision used when computing a bezier curve. Higher numbers are more precise but slower (and generate larger files).
#$bezierPrecision = 100;
use constant BEZIER_PRECISION => 36; #100; #use const; reduced for faster rendering (mainly used for silk screen and thermal pads)

# Ground planes and silk screen or larger copper rectangles or circles are filled line-by-line using this resolution.
use constant FILL_WIDTH => .01; #fill at most 0.01 inch at a time

# The max number of characters to read into memory
use constant MAX_BYTES => 10 * M; #bumped up to 10 MB, use const

use constant DUP_DRILL1 => TRUE; #FALSE; #kludge: ViewPlot doesn't load drill files that are too small so duplicate first tool

my $runtime = time(); #Time::HiRes::gettimeofday(); #measure my execution time

print STDERR "Loaded config settings from '${\(__FILE__)}'.\n";
1; #last value must be truthful to indicate successful load


#############################################################################################
#junk/experiment:

#use Package::Constants;
#use Exporter qw(import); #https://perldoc.perl.org/Exporter.html

#my $caller = "pdf2gerb::";

#sub cfg
#{
#    my $proto = shift;
#    my $class = ref($proto) || $proto;
#    my $settings =
#    {
#        $WANT_DEBUG => 990, #10; #level of debug wanted; higher == more, lower == less, 0 == none
#    };
#    bless($settings, $class);
#    return $settings;
#}

#use constant HELLO => "hi there2"; #"main::HELLO" => "hi there";
#use constant GOODBYE => 14; #"main::GOODBYE" => 12;

#print STDERR "read cfg file\n";

#our @EXPORT_OK = Package::Constants->list(__PACKAGE__); #https://www.perlmonks.org/?node_id=1072691; NOTE: "_OK" skips short/common names

#print STDERR scalar(@EXPORT_OK) . " consts exported:\n";
#foreach(@EXPORT_OK) { print STDERR "$_\n"; }
#my $val = main::thing("xyz");
#print STDERR "caller gave me $val\n";
#foreach my $arg (@ARGV) { print STDERR "arg $arg\n"; }

Download Details:

Author: swannman
Source Code: https://github.com/swannman/pdf2gerb

License: GPL-3.0 license

#perl 

DCODE SHOW

DCODE SHOW

1597917769

Animated Counter Using JavaScript With HTML CSS | JavaScript Counter Animation

https://youtu.be/CQFgmBhwuN0

#javascript #counter #animatedcounter #setinterval #javascript counter animation

CSS Boss

CSS Boss

1606912089

How to create a calculator using javascript - Pure JS tutorials |Web Tutorials

In this video I will tell you How to create a calculator using javascript very easily.

#how to build a simple calculator in javascript #how to create simple calculator using javascript #javascript calculator tutorial #javascript birthday calculator #calculator using javascript and html

What's New in ECMAScript 2022 (ES2022/ES13)?

Howdy, folks! The fact that you're here means you're looking for the new JavaScript features you can use in the close future. But by any chance, if you're not familiar with TC39, ECMA, or ECMAScript, check this article before reading this one, because you will need to know these to understand some of the following parts.

The transparent stages of the TC39

TC39 is an amazing and dedicated group of people who come from many different backgrounds and have one goal in common: they want to help to make the JavaScript language better. To do so, they have to keep many things in mind, and one rule they have is "don't break the web". Their approach to the language actually reminds me of the medical approach to the patients: "First, do no harm". Every step is carefully and meticulously calculated, so they don't break the existing parts.

Every feature that gets added to the spec has to go through the following 5 stages, just like drug trials. To proceed to the next stage, each has to achieve certain criteria. To be added to the ECMAScript spec, a feature has to be at least on stage 4.

  • Stage 0 / Proposal: A new possible feature that is planned to be presented to the committee, or proposals that haven't yet achieved the criteria to pass to the next stage. Check out the current stage 0 proposals from here.
  • Stage 1 / Proposal: Still primitive, but the committee is willing to spend time on solving this problem and the general structure of the API is defined. Check out the current stage 1 proposals from here.
  • Stage 2 / Draft: Critical aspects of the proposal and its problems are solved. These features are expected to exist in future versions of the spec. Check out the current stage 2 proposals from here.
  • Stage 3 / Candidate: The proposal is comprehensively and meticulously reviewed, no stone is left unturned. This is the final stage before the feature actually makes it to the spec. Check out the current stage 3 proposals from here.
  • Stage 4 / Finished: Congrats, you are in the spec! Check out the finished proposals from here.

The ones who made it before

JavaScript is an evolving language, and some features we use today were actually added pretty recently. After 2015, TC39 decided to make the changes annually, so each year they decide which new features are ready to be added. This is the list of the features that have been added to the spec after 2015:

ES2016

  • Array.prototype.includes(): Determines if a given element is included in the specified array. String.prototype.contains() was also deprecated and String.prototype.includes() was added to determine if a given string in included in another string.
  • Exponentiation operator(** and **=): a**b is shorthand notation for Math.pow(a,b), and a **= b is shorthand for a = a**b

ES2017

  • Object.values / Object.entries: Retrieves an array of values / arrays of key-value pairs, respectively.
  • Trailing commas in function parameter lists and calls: Both (a) => {} and (a,) => {} are valid function definitions, and both foo(a) and foo(a,) are valid function calls.
  • Async functions: async/await was introduced to JavaScript
  • Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptors(): Returns the property descriptors of all own properties of an object.
  • String.prototype.padStart() / String.prototype.padEnd(): Takes two arguments, first one being the repeat number, second one being the string that is going to be added and adds padding to the start or end of a given string.

ES2018

  • Promise.prototype.finally: Finally was introduced to register a callback function that runs when a promise is settled (either fulfilled or rejected)
  • Rest and spread operators(...): Rest operator collects values in an array. The spread operator spreads the values in an iterator.
  • Asynchronous iteration: for-await-of was introduced. It is a variation of the for-of iteration statement and can be used in async iterable objects.
  • Improvements on Regular Expressions: RegExp Unicode Property Escapes, RegExp Lookbehind Assertions, s(dotAll) flag for regular expressions, RegExp named capture groups

ES2019

  • Array.prototype.flat(): Flattens nested arrays up to a provided depth. Default depth is 1.
  • Array.prototype.flatMap(): Flattens and maps a given array subsequently. Flattening depth is 1.
  • Object.fromEntries(): Builds an object from given key-value pairs.
  • String.prototype.trimStart(): Trims the start of a given string.
  • String.prototype.trimEnd(): Trims the end of a given string.
  • Symbol.prototype.description: Read-only and optional string description for the Symbol objects.
  • Optional catch binding: Allows the omission of the catch block.
  • Also the implementation of some existing features have changed, such as JSON.stringify(), Function.prototype.toString() and Array.sort()

ES2020

  • String.prototype.matchAll(): Returns all matches for a global regex.
  • dynamic imports: Before this, we could only use static imports, which only accepted strings for the module path. With dynamic imports, we got to conditionally import modules by using promises.
  • BigInt: A new primitive data type that represents numbers bigger than 2⁵³.
  • Promise.allSettled(): Returns when all given promises are settled (rejected or fulfilled, doesn't matter).
  • globalThis: Before this, the global object had different syntax in different JavaScript environments (in a web browser it can be either window, self, frames, or this, in web workers it is self, in Node.js it is global). globalThis provided a single syntax for the global object in all JavaScript environments.
  • Optional Chaining Operator(?.): Legible property chains that don't throw an error if a requested reference is missing. If one of the chained properties is nullish (null or undefined), the whole expression returns undefined.
  • Nullish coalescing operator(??): Binary operator. If the value of the left side expression is null or undefined, the right side of the operator is evaluated.

ES2021

  • String.prototype.replaceAll(): Replaces all the occurrences of a given string with another.
  • Promise.any(): resolves if any of the given promises are resolved.
  • Underscore as a numeric separator: To increase legibility in bigger numbers, numeric separators can be replaced with underscores.
  • Logical assignment operators(&&=, ||=, ??=) All of them are binary operators, with the added functionality for assignment. For &&=, if the left side is truthy, the right-side expression is evaluated and assigned to the variable on the left side. For ||= if the left side is falsy, the right-side expression is evaluated and assigned to the left-side variable. With the ??=, if the left-side value is null or undefined, the right-side expression is evaluated and assigned to the variable on the left side.
  • WeakRefs and Finalizers: This is a class that helps you create weak references to objects, so they can be garbage collected. A FinalizationRegistry object lets you register a callback that will allow you to invoke when the object is garbage collected.

The ones who made it to ES2022

Alright! You can check the latest spec that was published from here.

1. Class Fields:

Class Public Instance Fields & Private Instance Fields:

Since ES2015, we could define fields by simply setting them up in our constructors. As a convention, fields that were not supposed to be accessed outside of the class methods were preceded by an underscore, but this did not stop any consumer of this class from accessing them anyway.

class ColorButton extends HTMLElement {
  
  constructor() {
    this.color = "red"
    this._clicked = false
  }
}

const button = new ColorButton()
// Public fields can be accessed and changed by anyone
button.color = "blue" 

// Curse your sudden but inevitable betrayal 
console.log(button._clicked) // Prints: false, can be accessed from the instance
button._clicked = true // Doesn't throw an error, can be read from the instance

The first part of this proposal offers a more clear way to define the fields in a class. Instead of defining them in our constructor, we can now define, and if we want to, initialize them on the top level of our classes.

class ColorButton extends HTMLElement {
  color = "red"
  _clicked = false
}

The second part offers a more secure way of hiding private fields from prying eyes. Instead of the conventional underscore, we can now use a preceding # in the field names to block anybody from accessing them outside of the class they're defined on.

class ColorButton extends HTMLElement {
  // All fields are public by default
  color = "red"

  // Private fields start with a #, can only be changed from inside the class
  #clicked = false
}

const button = new ColorButton()
// Public fields can be accessed and changed by anyone
button.color = "blue"

// SyntaxError here 
console.log(button.#clicked) // Cannot be read from outside
button.#clicked = true // Cannot be assigned a value from outside

Private instance methods and accessors:

Some methods and variables of a class are internally important for that class to behave like it's supposed to, but shouldn't be accidentally reached from outside. To protect these implementation details and keep them strictly internal, we can use private methods and accessors with the syntax of a preceding #.

class Banner extends HTMLElement {
  // Private variable that cannot be reached directly from outside, but can be modified by the methods inside:

  #slogan = "Hello there!"
  #counter = 0

  // private getters and setters (accessors):

  get #slogan() {return #slogan.toUpperCase()}
  set #slogan(text) {this.#slogan = text.trim()}

  get #counter() {return #counter}
  set #counter(value) {this.#counter = value}

  constructor() {
    super();
    this.onmouseover = this.#mouseover.bind(this);
  }

  // private method:
  #mouseover() {
    this.#counter = this.#counter++;
    this.#slogan = `Hello there! You've been here ${this.#counter} times.`
  }
}

Static class fields and private static methods:

Static class fields and methods are useful when you want certain fields and methods to only exist in the prototype, but not in every instance of the given class. On the other side, you might also want to allow some of these fields and methods to be only accessed from within the class.

Since ES2015, we can define static fields on a class by simply defining the field on the class itself.

class Circle {}
Circle.PI = 3.14

Going forward, we are now able to define these static fields inside the class definition using the static keyword.

class Circle {
  static PI = 3.14
}

Just like we did with class fields and methods, we can use the # prefix to set any static method or field as private. This prevents access to these static fields and methods from the outside, meaning they can only be accessed from inside the class.

class Circle {
  static #PI = 3.14

  static #calculateArea(radius) {
    return #PI * radius * radius
  }

  static calculateProperties(radius) {
    return {
      radius: radius,
      area: #calculateArea(radius)
    }
  }

}

// Public static method, outputs {radius: 10, area: 314}
console.log(Circle.calculateProperties(10))

// SyntaxError - Private static field
console.log(Circle.PI)

// SyntaxError - Private static method
console.log(Circle.calculateArea(5))

2. Ergonomic brand checks for Private Fields:

In public fields, if you try to access a non-existent field on a class, you get undefined as a result. However, private class fields throw an exception instead of returning undefined when you try to access a non-existent field on an object. Then, one way to check if a private field exists in an object is to see if accessing that field inside the class throws an exception or not. However, this approach has a big shortcoming. The exception might simply be because of another reason, such as a faulty getter on an existing field.

That's why, in keyword was proposed to allow us to check if a given private property/method exists in a class instance:

class VeryPrivate {
  constructor() {
    super()
  }

  #variable
  #method() {}
  get #getter() {}
  set #setter(text) {
    this.#variable = text
  }

  static isPrivate(obj) {
    return (
      #variable in obj && #method in obj && #getter in obj && #setter in obj
    )
  }
}

3. RegExp Match Indices

Regular expressions allow us to search for patterns in strings. If you're not familiar with regular expressions, you might want to start by reading this article first.

Both Regexp.exec and String.matchAll gives us a list of matches as a result. Regexp.exec gives these results one by one, so you need to call it multiple times to get all matches until it returns null. On the other hand String.matchAll returns an iterator where you can iterate over all matches. These results include both the full string of characters and the parenthesized substrings being matched, the input string and the 0-based index of the match. Take a look at the following example:


const str = 'Ingredients: cocoa powder, cocoa butter, other stuff'
const regex = /(cocoa) ([a-z]+)/g
const matches = [...str.matchAll(regex)]

// 0: "cocoa powder", 1: "cocoa", 2: "powder"
// index: 13
// input: "Ingredients: cocoa powder, cocoa butter, other stuff"
console.log(matches[0])


// 0: "cocoa butter", 1: "cocoa", 2: "butter"
// index: 27
// input: "Ingredients: cocoa powder, cocoa butter, other stuff"
console.log(matches[1])

While these results are pretty informative about the location of the entire match in the original input, they lack information regarding the indices of the substring matches. By using the new /d flag, we can ask for the start and end positions of each matched capture group.


const str = 'Ingredients: cocoa powder, cocoa butter, other stuff'
const regex = /(cocoa) ([a-z]+)/gd
const matches = [...str.matchAll(regex)]

// 0: "cocoa powder", 1: "cocoa", 2: "powder"
// index: 13
// input: "Ingredients: cocoa powder, cocoa butter, other stuff"
// indices: [[13,25],[13,18],[19,25]]
console.log(matches[0])


// 0: "cocoa butter", 1: "cocoa", 2: "butter"
// index: 27
// input: "Ingredients: cocoa powder, cocoa butter, other stuff"
// indices: [[27,39],[27,32],[33,39]]
console.log(matches[1])

4. Top-level await:

Until this point, we could only use await in the scope of async functions. This was fine until it wasn't, like when we hit the top level of our module and could not use the await keyword. Now await can be used at the top level of a module, and can be super handy when initializing imports and creating fallbacks.

Here's an example:

// Before the top-level await, JavaScript would have given you a SyntaxError with this line of code, but that is no more
await Promise.resolve(console.log("🎉"))

So until the awaited promise is resolved, the execution of the current module and the parent module that imports the current child module are deferred, but the sibling modules can be executed in the same order. Check this article out to see more examples.

#javascript #es2022 

Alex  Sam

Alex Sam

1593782362

Top Chat Software for Live Streaming & Broadcasting Web & Mobile Apps

Do you Increase your Website Engagment?

I analysed, ranked and reviewed best live video streaming chat APIs and SDKs for your web & mobile app based on client reviews and ratings. portfolio, usecases, cost, secure streaming, live chat features, cost, support, etc.

Turn your viewers into participatients with Live Streaming Chat Solutions. There are lot of Real-time chat apis & SDks Providers have in online market now. You can easily integrte and customize real time chat solutions into your new or existing live video streaming web and iOS & android applications. Below have mentioned best real time chat api & SDk Proivders.

Live video streaming chat api
Live video streaming chat apis

Here are The Most Popular Live Video Streaming Chat APIs & SDKs to be Considered for your Mobile App

1. CONTUS Fly - Real-time Messaging Platform for Live Streaming Apps & Webs

CONTUS Fly is one of the leading real time messaging software providers in the market for a decade. Their messaging platforms are completely customizable since they provide Chat APIs and SDKs to integrate real time chat feasibility on your live streaming applications irrespective of audience base. Engage your audience like a live concert, stadium like experience through digitally. Create channels for every live streaming event, sports or anything that would create buzz. Enable audience to interact with each other over voice, video chats and real-time text chats with engaging emojis. CONTUS Fly enables users to add emojis and stickers to captivate each audience and create fun.

Highlight Features of CONTUS Fly Live Video Streaming Platform Includes:

  1. Chat for Live Video Streaming
  2. Video & Audio Recording
  3. Video Calling
  4. Drawing whitebord
  5. Screen Sharing
  6. End to End Encryption

2. Apphitect -Instant chat for Live Streaming Platforms

To make every live streaming and broadcasting videos more engaging and entertaining, Apphitect’s instant messaging comes with exciting Instant messaging chat APIs to add chat into streaming applications. Apphitect is built with multiple real time communication features like video chat, voice chat and real-time chat to your streaming apps. Their solution surprisingly has a wide range of features to communicate, engage and increase subscription benefits.

Highlight Features of Apphitect Live Insterative Broadcasting Software Includes:

  1. Live Video Streaming Chat
  2. Cross Platform Support
  3. Audio & Video Recording
  4. Live Video Calling
  5. Emoji & Stickers

3. MirrorFly - Enterprise Real Time Chat for Streaming Websites

One of the enterprise-grade real-time chat solutions built to create virtual chat experience for live streaming events and websites for big brands and startups. Irrespective of audience base, category, MirrorFly provides customizable real time chat APIs to add virtual communication mediums on live streaming and broadcasting applications. Their solution comes with absolute moderation tools and open channels to talk and listen with your audience. MirrorFly’s server infrastructure has the potential to handle concurrent messages and users and to achieve maximum sales conversion.

Highlight Features of MirrorFly Live Streaming Chat API Includes:

  1. Face to Face Video Calling
  2. Live Interactive Broadcasting
  3. Call Recording
  4. Digital Whiteboard
  5. Group Video Calling

4. Applozic - Real-time Chat Plugin for Live Broadcasting & Video Streaming apps

When it comes to building a live streaming chat app software that covers the entire platforms and demand All-in-One package (features, Customization to any extent) with a one-time payment for lifetime performance, then undoubtedly Contus Fly makes the right choice to partner with. The company offers live broadcasting SDK for Android/iOS and chat APIs for customization.

Highlight Features of Applozic Chat Live Streaming Platform Includes:

  1. Real time Communication
  2. Cross Platform Support
  3. Live Audio Broadcasting
  4. Push Notifications
  5. Secure Image Sharing

5. Sendbird - Top Real time Chat for Live Video Streams

Being a leading real time chat platform provider in the market, Sendbird has its own hallmark of communication features to the world’s most prominent live streaming applications. Their real time chat solution enables broadcasting and streaming platform’ owners to create a physical equivalent digital chat experience for the audience during any live event streaming to interact, collaborate and cheer together within the same streaming screen. By creating open channels and groups, you can enable the audience to interact with each other during any streaming, engage them with polls, stickers, multiple communication channels and more.

Highlight Features of Sendbird Live Streaming Chat API Includes:

  1. Chat for Streaming website
  2. Messaging Data
  3. Multi Platforms
  4. Push Notifications
  5. End to End Encryption

6. Agora - Interactive Live Chat for Live Video Streaming

Agora, a deep integratable API available in the market to deliver live interactive streaming experience for workplace, enterprises, gaming, retail, telehealth and social live streaming websites. With easy-to-embed SDKs, Agora empowers businesses to add HD and low latency video and voice chat features into any streaming platforms and channels. Their easy-to-embed real time chat features encourage higher levels of user engagement and opportunity to drive more audience.

7. Enablex - A Redefined Communication APIs for In-app Chat

Their smart and secure chat APIs deliver real-time chat feasibility for live and on-demand video streaming websites. The real time chat features provides users to communicate and engage within the same streaming platform irrespective of interaction medium and audience count. Enablex offers platform-as-a-service communication solutions for real time messaging integration with APIs hosting possibility on public, private and cloud deployment. Their APIs are enriched with multiple communication features and engagement tools like live-polls, stickers and more.

8. Pubnub - In-app Chat Platforms for Live Event Streaming Websites

In order to increase user engagement with live and remote audiences, Pubnub offers real time messaging chat functionality with interactive features to drive event-based engagement with mass chat. Their in-app chat feature enhances live programs, event streaming and blogging content with live polling, multiple chats and more. It also enables live streaming websites to build community, channels and super groups during live streaming to bring the entire audience base to one place.

9. Vonage - Communication APIs for In-app Messagings

Vonage is a prime provider of communication APIs for major industrial sectors and enterprise workplaces. With its API, businesses such as live streaming applications can integrate in-app messaging features into any streaming platforms on Android, iOS and Web to empower user engagement. Their APIs are powered with scalable infrastructure and provide multiple communication mediums such as in-app voice, video and chat proactively engaging the audience.

10. Firekast - Live Chat Widget for Video Streaming Player

Firekast provides a customizable live chat widget with HTML code for streaming players to enable chat within any streaming or on-demand videos. The chat widget gives the ability for brands and content owners to make the audience to interact with each other for better engagement and proactivity during streaming. The Firekast Live chat comes with moderator tools that will allow administrators to delete or ban abusive content and users from the channel or groups. Firekast’s live chat comes with a private chat widget to create public or private chat rooms to make effective collaboration and discussions.
 

Conclusion
And this is all the real time chat providers in the market to implement chat functionality in any live streaming or broadcasting platforms. More than delivering entertaining live content, creating a massive engagement and buzz for every live event is the smarter way to turn every audience into a protiable subscriber. Picking up the right software provider is more important than just handling the integration process.

#live #live-streaming-solutions #live-streaming-chat-api #live-streaming-chat-sdk #chat-api-for-live-broadcasting