Mitchel  Carter

Mitchel Carter

1603569600

How to configure external DNS with DigitalOcean DNS extension on Plesk

As a customer-friendly hosting panel, Plesk’s entire architecture and ecosystem are strategically designed to streamline and simplify things for customers. Besides the availability of extensions, the menu empowers clients to self-manage various backend and front-end aspects of their website. One of the very useful extensions in this list is the DigitalOcean DNS extension. In this tutorial, we will learn how to configure an external DNS server quickly and safely with Plesk.

There are good chances that, as a genuine netizen, Domain Name Service shouldn’t be an alien word for you. But sharing more knowledge never hurts. So, let’s dig deeper into this before coming to the main topic.

DNS described in simple language

Think of DNS as a translator between you and the computer. DNS or Domain Name Server converts the simple English names like www.google.com into “computer language” of numerical codes.

This process of changing general domain names into computer language is called Resolving. The entity/agent that obtains the IP address by communicating with other servers is called DNS resolver. Loaded with sophisticated capabilities, Plesk can work as a reliable and competent DNS resolver.

Here is the USPs of Plesk as a DNS server resolver

  • It can act as a backup server
  • Quick and direct translation services
  • Facility to handle translation services on a remote server

How does DNS work?

A specific storage space containing specific domain addresses either in a file or an authorized server is called domain zones. There are two types of DNS servers – Root DNS servers and secondary DNS servers, commonly known as lower-level DNS servers.

Root DNS servers refer to a hierarchically arranged global storage system containing the entire DNS database and corresponding IP addresses for all domain names. When the requesting browser attempts to access, say www.myexample.com it requests the authorized server to get the corresponding IP address.

Next level DNS servers store partial DNS databases. These servers are owned by business entities or ISPs who have registered their computers on the DNS system. They run the DNS server software to initiate and manage the DNS resolution process. Each DNS server comes with a public IP as well as vital databases of other hosts including their network names and addresses.

The visitor enters the desired domain name in the address bar and hits enter. It initiates the communication between visitors’ system and DNS server. Acting as a DNS client the web browser requests DNS data from a DNS server which is run by the user’s Internet service provider. Acting on the request the server looks into the internal DNS database to find a matching IP address.

In case if the server fails to find the match it forwards the request to another secondary DNS server in the network. If the matching IP is not found there the request is then escalated to the root server containing the global DNS database. After getting the domain name and corresponding IP the data is returned to the web browser through the route of DNS network. This is known as forward DNS. There is another process known as reverse DNS but that is beyond the scope of this article. You can read about it here.

Delegating DNS zone responsibilities

As a domain name client, you can either allow your registrar to handle the DNS zone responsibilities or delegate it to Plesk. The latter option enables you to self manage your domain zone through your Plesk interface.

Just like most of us techies, DNS is also a multi-tasker. Along with translating domain names into IP addresses, it also delivers other vital data like information related to mail domain, IP validity status, etc.

Configure an external DNS server quickly and safely with Plesk

By default the Plesk works as a master DNS server for the hosted website, i.e., other DNS servers can directly transfer their zones file from it. You also have the option to use the third party DNS servers. In this guide, we present the step by step instructions on how to install a digital ocean DNS extension on Plesk.

  • Go to the Plesk Extensions Catalog.
  • Search for DigitalOcean DNS and click “Install on my server”
  • Open the extension.
  • It opens the page presenting two options for installation namely “0Auth Authentication” and “API token”

configure an external DNS server quickly and safely with Plesk - Plesk

Setting up your DigitalOcean DNS using Plesk Extension with API Token

Click on “API Token.” You would be prompted to enter a token. To generate the token, log into your digital ocean account and click API (left bottom). Click on “Generate a new token”. Enter your desired token name in the resultant dialogue box and click the button below it. You would see the details of the generated token. Copy the code.

Next, go to the Plesk tab, paste code in the box, and click the button below it. On the next screen, you can confirm that the digital ocean extensions have been connected. Click on the option “Activate all” and the extension will be active on all the connected domains.

#product and technology #tips and easy-reading #0auth authentication #api token #clouds #digitalocean #digitalocean dns #dns #dns servers #plesk extensions #tutorial

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How to configure external DNS with DigitalOcean DNS extension on Plesk
Mitchel  Carter

Mitchel Carter

1603569600

How to configure external DNS with DigitalOcean DNS extension on Plesk

As a customer-friendly hosting panel, Plesk’s entire architecture and ecosystem are strategically designed to streamline and simplify things for customers. Besides the availability of extensions, the menu empowers clients to self-manage various backend and front-end aspects of their website. One of the very useful extensions in this list is the DigitalOcean DNS extension. In this tutorial, we will learn how to configure an external DNS server quickly and safely with Plesk.

There are good chances that, as a genuine netizen, Domain Name Service shouldn’t be an alien word for you. But sharing more knowledge never hurts. So, let’s dig deeper into this before coming to the main topic.

DNS described in simple language

Think of DNS as a translator between you and the computer. DNS or Domain Name Server converts the simple English names like www.google.com into “computer language” of numerical codes.

This process of changing general domain names into computer language is called Resolving. The entity/agent that obtains the IP address by communicating with other servers is called DNS resolver. Loaded with sophisticated capabilities, Plesk can work as a reliable and competent DNS resolver.

Here is the USPs of Plesk as a DNS server resolver

  • It can act as a backup server
  • Quick and direct translation services
  • Facility to handle translation services on a remote server

How does DNS work?

A specific storage space containing specific domain addresses either in a file or an authorized server is called domain zones. There are two types of DNS servers – Root DNS servers and secondary DNS servers, commonly known as lower-level DNS servers.

Root DNS servers refer to a hierarchically arranged global storage system containing the entire DNS database and corresponding IP addresses for all domain names. When the requesting browser attempts to access, say www.myexample.com it requests the authorized server to get the corresponding IP address.

Next level DNS servers store partial DNS databases. These servers are owned by business entities or ISPs who have registered their computers on the DNS system. They run the DNS server software to initiate and manage the DNS resolution process. Each DNS server comes with a public IP as well as vital databases of other hosts including their network names and addresses.

The visitor enters the desired domain name in the address bar and hits enter. It initiates the communication between visitors’ system and DNS server. Acting as a DNS client the web browser requests DNS data from a DNS server which is run by the user’s Internet service provider. Acting on the request the server looks into the internal DNS database to find a matching IP address.

In case if the server fails to find the match it forwards the request to another secondary DNS server in the network. If the matching IP is not found there the request is then escalated to the root server containing the global DNS database. After getting the domain name and corresponding IP the data is returned to the web browser through the route of DNS network. This is known as forward DNS. There is another process known as reverse DNS but that is beyond the scope of this article. You can read about it here.

Delegating DNS zone responsibilities

As a domain name client, you can either allow your registrar to handle the DNS zone responsibilities or delegate it to Plesk. The latter option enables you to self manage your domain zone through your Plesk interface.

Just like most of us techies, DNS is also a multi-tasker. Along with translating domain names into IP addresses, it also delivers other vital data like information related to mail domain, IP validity status, etc.

Configure an external DNS server quickly and safely with Plesk

By default the Plesk works as a master DNS server for the hosted website, i.e., other DNS servers can directly transfer their zones file from it. You also have the option to use the third party DNS servers. In this guide, we present the step by step instructions on how to install a digital ocean DNS extension on Plesk.

  • Go to the Plesk Extensions Catalog.
  • Search for DigitalOcean DNS and click “Install on my server”
  • Open the extension.
  • It opens the page presenting two options for installation namely “0Auth Authentication” and “API token”

configure an external DNS server quickly and safely with Plesk - Plesk

Setting up your DigitalOcean DNS using Plesk Extension with API Token

Click on “API Token.” You would be prompted to enter a token. To generate the token, log into your digital ocean account and click API (left bottom). Click on “Generate a new token”. Enter your desired token name in the resultant dialogue box and click the button below it. You would see the details of the generated token. Copy the code.

Next, go to the Plesk tab, paste code in the box, and click the button below it. On the next screen, you can confirm that the digital ocean extensions have been connected. Click on the option “Activate all” and the extension will be active on all the connected domains.

#product and technology #tips and easy-reading #0auth authentication #api token #clouds #digitalocean #digitalocean dns #dns #dns servers #plesk extensions #tutorial

Loma  Baumbach

Loma Baumbach

1595774031

ScaleGrid DigitalOcean Support for MySQL, PostgreSQL and Redis™

PALO ALTO, Calif., June 9, 2020 – ScaleGrid, a leading Database-as-a-Service (DBaaS) provider, has just announced support for their MySQLPostgreSQL and Redis™ solutions on DigitalOcean. This launch is in addition to their current DigitalOcean offering for MongoDB® database, the only DBaaS to support this database on DigitalOcean.

MySQL and PostgreSQL are the top two open source relational databases in the world, and Redis is the top key-value database. These databases are a natural fit for the developer market that has gravitated towards DigitalOcean since its launch just nine years ago in 2011. The open source model is not only popular with the developer market, but also enterprise companies looking to modernize their infrastructure and reduce spend.  DigitalOcean instance costs are also over 28% less expensive than AWS, and over 26% less than Azure, providing significant savings for companies who are struggling in this global climate.

ScaleGrid’s MySQL, PostgreSQL and Redis™ solutions on DigitalOcean are competitively priced starting at just $15/GB, the same as DigitalOcean’s Managed Database solution, but offer on average 30% more storage for the same price. Additionally, ScaleGrid offers several competitive advantages such as full superuser access, custom master-slave configurations, and advanced slow query analysis and monitoring capabilities through their sophisticated platform. To compare more features, check out their ScaleGrid vs. DigitalOcean MySQLScaleGrid vs. DigitalOcean PostgreSQL and ScaleGrid vs. DigitalOcean Redis™ pages.

#cloud #database #developer #digital ocean #mysql #postgresql #redis #scalegrid #advanced performance #database infrastructure #dbaas on digitalocean #digitalocean customers #digitalocean instance costs #digitalocean managed databases #high performance ssd #mysql digitalocean #postgresql digitalocean #redis digitalocean #scalegrid digitalocean #scalegrid vs. digitalocean

Joe  Hoppe

Joe Hoppe

1595905879

Best MySQL DigitalOcean Performance – ScaleGrid vs. DigitalOcean Managed Databases

HTML to Markdown

MySQL is the all-time number one open source database in the world, and a staple in RDBMS space. DigitalOcean is quickly building its reputation as the developers cloud by providing an affordable, flexible and easy to use cloud platform for developers to work with. MySQL on DigitalOcean is a natural fit, but what’s the best way to deploy your cloud database? In this post, we are going to compare the top two providers, DigitalOcean Managed Databases for MySQL vs. ScaleGrid MySQL hosting on DigitalOcean.

At a glance – TLDR
ScaleGrid Blog - At a glance overview - 1st pointCompare Throughput
ScaleGrid averages almost 40% higher throughput over DigitalOcean for MySQL, with up to 46% higher throughput in write-intensive workloads. Read now

ScaleGrid Blog - At a glance overview - 2nd pointCompare Latency
On average, ScaleGrid achieves almost 30% lower latency over DigitalOcean for the same deployment configurations. Read now

ScaleGrid Blog - At a glance overview - 3rd pointCompare Pricing
ScaleGrid provides 30% more storage on average vs. DigitalOcean for MySQL at the same affordable price. Read now

MySQL DigitalOcean Performance Benchmark
In this benchmark, we compare equivalent plan sizes between ScaleGrid MySQL on DigitalOcean and DigitalOcean Managed Databases for MySQL. We are going to use a common, popular plan size using the below configurations for this performance benchmark:

Comparison Overview
ScaleGridDigitalOceanInstance TypeMedium: 4 vCPUsMedium: 4 vCPUsMySQL Version8.0.208.0.20RAM8GB8GBSSD140GB115GBDeployment TypeStandaloneStandaloneRegionSF03SF03SupportIncludedBusiness-level support included with account sizes over $500/monthMonthly Price$120$120

As you can see above, ScaleGrid and DigitalOcean offer the same plan configurations across this plan size, apart from SSD where ScaleGrid provides over 20% more storage for the same price.

To ensure the most accurate results in our performance tests, we run the benchmark four times for each comparison to find the average performance across throughput and latency over read-intensive workloads, balanced workloads, and write-intensive workloads.

Throughput
In this benchmark, we measure MySQL throughput in terms of queries per second (QPS) to measure our query efficiency. To quickly summarize the results, we display read-intensive, write-intensive and balanced workload averages below for 150 threads for ScaleGrid vs. DigitalOcean MySQL:

ScaleGrid MySQL vs DigitalOcean Managed Databases - Throughput Performance Graph

For the common 150 thread comparison, ScaleGrid averages almost 40% higher throughput over DigitalOcean for MySQL, with up to 46% higher throughput in write-intensive workloads.

#cloud #database #developer #digital ocean #mysql #performance #scalegrid #95th percentile latency #balanced workloads #developers cloud #digitalocean droplet #digitalocean managed databases #digitalocean performance #digitalocean pricing #higher throughput #latency benchmark #lower latency #mysql benchmark setup #mysql client threads #mysql configuration #mysql digitalocean #mysql latency #mysql on digitalocean #mysql throughput #performance benchmark #queries per second #read-intensive #scalegrid mysql #scalegrid vs. digitalocean #throughput benchmark #write-intensive

Vincent Lab

Vincent Lab

1605177603

My Thoughts on DigitalOcean and Web Hosting

In this video, I’ll be talking about why I picked digital ocean for hosting Vincent Lab.

💰 Get $100 in credit over 60 days to experiment with DigitalOcean for Free
https://m.do.co/c/1ee8ea775bd9

#digitalocean #digitalocean review #host website on digitalocean #host your website on digitalocean #hosting #web server

Ray  Patel

Ray Patel

1623940860

Way to find out if DNS is down or your instance with python

DNS-PING

Way to find out if DNS is down or your instance.

Problem: At times it happens that DNS provider services of a website URL is down and so to reduce response time by not diagnosing the infrastructure and informing the user to check with DNS provider.

Functionality: Lambda in python pings the URL to be monitored and fetch the response. If the response code is anything other than 200 it triggers CloudWatch event and send SNS to user.

How to Run the Script : Create a Lambda function called “DNS-PING” the run-time version Python 3.6 and above by using the attach code. Creation of the Lambda function will in turn create CloudWatch Logs groups for its logging. Lamda can be call every 5 mins or as per your business requirement.

#network #way to find out if dns is down or your instance with python #python #dns #way to find out if dns is down or your instance #find out if dns