Desmond  Gerber

Desmond Gerber

1668502876

Bash Continue Built-In Statement

“In bash, the continue built-in statement functions as a control statement. Program control is passed to the next iteration unless specified in the enclosing loop body for the current iteration. This concept appears in bash along with other programming languages.

However, it is always hard for a beginner to learn the bash continue statement. So if you are also looking for simple ways to learn it, this tutorial is for you. This tutorial will give you a brief on the bash continue built-in statement with various examples.”

Bash Continue Built-In Statement

The bash continue built-in statement resumes the iteration of an enclosing loop such as while, for, select, or until. It has meaning only when it applies to loops. Its general syntax is :

continue < n >

In the above syntax, n denotes an integer value whose default value is 1. This integer value represents the depth of the continue statement. Execution continues on the loop control of the nth enclosing loop when n numbers are given, i.e., you can start the outer loop statement by increasing the integer value.

Resumes an Iteration in Different Loops With Continue Built-In Statement

In bash, you can use the continue statement in different loops. It depends on the loop type whether the program restarts or starts over.

Continue Built-in Statement in For Loop

The controlling variable takes the next element in the list as its value within the “for” loop. We have taken numbers from 3 to 60 under the for loop in the following script. Here, through the continue statement, we print out those numbers divisible by 10 and continue the loop.


In the following output, you can see that only those numbers from 3 to 60 are printed, which are divisible by 10.

Continue Built-in Statement in While Loop

When you use the continue statement in “until” and “while” constructions, the system resumes the execution with the command at the top of the loop.

This while loop starts with 25 numbers and continues until the value of n reaches 15 in the loop. Under this loop, if the value of n is less than 19, it prints that number along with the “class.”


On running the above script, you will get the blow output.

Continue Built-in Statement Until Loop

Compared to the while loop, the until loop is not much different. In the same way, it works. In the following until loop example, numbers will be added starting from 25 and will continue until n exceeds 13. Under this loop, if the value of n is more than 17, it will print with the number “You are not an adult.”

You will get the following output after running the above script.

Wrapping Up

You use the bash continue built-in statement when you want to leave the loop partially but skip a code when the input meets a specific condition. The continue statement passes the control back to the loop statement for the next iteration, except for executing the code when a defined condition is met.

Original article source at: https://linuxhint.com/

#bash #statement #functions 

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Bash Continue Built-In Statement
Annalise  Hyatt

Annalise Hyatt

1594881960

Bash break and continue

Loops allow you to run one or more commands multiple times until a certain condition is met. However, sometimes you may need to alter the flow of the loop and terminate the loop or only the current iteration.

In Bash, break and continue statements allows you to control the loop execution.

Bash break Statement

The break statement terminates the current loop and passes program control to the command that follows the terminated loop. It is used to exit from a forwhile[until](https://linuxize.com/post/bash-until-loop/), or select loop. s The syntax of the break statement takes the following form:

break [n]

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[n] is an optional argument and must be greater than or equal to 1. When [n] is provided, the n-th enclosing loop is exited. break 1 is equivalent to break.

To better understand how to use the break statement, let’s take a look at the following examples.

In the script below, the execution of the [while](https://linuxize.com/post/bash-while-loop/) loop will be interrupted once the current iterated item is equal to 2:

i=0

while [[ $i -lt 5 ]]
do
  echo "Number: $i"
  ((i++))
  if [[ $i -eq 2 ]]; then
    break
  fi
done

echo 'All Done!'

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Number: 0
Number: 1
All Done!

#bash #bash break #bash continue statement

Gordon  Murray

Gordon Murray

1668748920

How to Bash Continue Built-In Statement

“In bash, the continue built-in statement functions as a control statement. Program control is passed to the next iteration unless specified in the enclosing loop body for the current iteration. This concept appears in bash along with other programming languages.

However, it is always hard for a beginner to learn the bash continue statement. So if you are also looking for simple ways to learn it, this tutorial is for you. This tutorial will give you a brief on the bash continue built-in statement with various examples.”

Bash Continue Built-In Statement

The bash continue built-in statement resumes the iteration of an enclosing loop such as while, for, select, or until. It has meaning only when it applies to loops. Its general syntax is :

continue < n >

 
In the above syntax, n denotes an integer value whose default value is 1. This integer value represents the depth of the continue statement. Execution continues on the loop control of the nth enclosing loop when n numbers are given, i.e., you can start the outer loop statement by increasing the integer value.

Resumes an Iteration in Different Loops With Continue Built-In Statement

In bash, you can use the continue statement in different loops. It depends on the loop type whether the program restarts or starts over.

Continue Built-in Statement in For Loop

The controlling variable takes the next element in the list as its value within the “for” loop. We have taken numbers from 3 to 60 under the for loop in the following script. Here, through the continue statement, we print out those numbers divisible by 10 and continue the loop.


In the following output, you can see that only those numbers from 3 to 60 are printed, which are divisible by 10.

Continue Built-in Statement in While Loop

When you use the continue statement in “until” and “while” constructions, the system resumes the execution with the command at the top of the loop.

This while loop starts with 25 numbers and continues until the value of n reaches 15 in the loop. Under this loop, if the value of n is less than 19, it prints that number along with the “class.”


On running the above script, you will get the blow output.

Continue Built-in Statement Until Loop

Compared to the while loop, the until loop is not much different. In the same way, it works. In the following until loop example, numbers will be added starting from 25 and will continue until n exceeds 13. Under this loop, if the value of n is more than 17, it will print with the number “You are not an adult.”


You will get the following output after running the above script.

Wrapping Up

You use the bash continue built-in statement when you want to leave the loop partially but skip a code when the input meets a specific condition. The continue statement passes the control back to the loop statement for the next iteration, except for executing the code when a defined condition is met.

Original article source at: https://linuxhint.com/

#bash #statement 

Desmond  Gerber

Desmond Gerber

1668502876

Bash Continue Built-In Statement

“In bash, the continue built-in statement functions as a control statement. Program control is passed to the next iteration unless specified in the enclosing loop body for the current iteration. This concept appears in bash along with other programming languages.

However, it is always hard for a beginner to learn the bash continue statement. So if you are also looking for simple ways to learn it, this tutorial is for you. This tutorial will give you a brief on the bash continue built-in statement with various examples.”

Bash Continue Built-In Statement

The bash continue built-in statement resumes the iteration of an enclosing loop such as while, for, select, or until. It has meaning only when it applies to loops. Its general syntax is :

continue < n >

In the above syntax, n denotes an integer value whose default value is 1. This integer value represents the depth of the continue statement. Execution continues on the loop control of the nth enclosing loop when n numbers are given, i.e., you can start the outer loop statement by increasing the integer value.

Resumes an Iteration in Different Loops With Continue Built-In Statement

In bash, you can use the continue statement in different loops. It depends on the loop type whether the program restarts or starts over.

Continue Built-in Statement in For Loop

The controlling variable takes the next element in the list as its value within the “for” loop. We have taken numbers from 3 to 60 under the for loop in the following script. Here, through the continue statement, we print out those numbers divisible by 10 and continue the loop.


In the following output, you can see that only those numbers from 3 to 60 are printed, which are divisible by 10.

Continue Built-in Statement in While Loop

When you use the continue statement in “until” and “while” constructions, the system resumes the execution with the command at the top of the loop.

This while loop starts with 25 numbers and continues until the value of n reaches 15 in the loop. Under this loop, if the value of n is less than 19, it prints that number along with the “class.”


On running the above script, you will get the blow output.

Continue Built-in Statement Until Loop

Compared to the while loop, the until loop is not much different. In the same way, it works. In the following until loop example, numbers will be added starting from 25 and will continue until n exceeds 13. Under this loop, if the value of n is more than 17, it will print with the number “You are not an adult.”

You will get the following output after running the above script.

Wrapping Up

You use the bash continue built-in statement when you want to leave the loop partially but skip a code when the input meets a specific condition. The continue statement passes the control back to the loop statement for the next iteration, except for executing the code when a defined condition is met.

Original article source at: https://linuxhint.com/

#bash #statement #functions 

Macey  Legros

Macey Legros

1600234920

Java Continue Statement Example | Continue Statement Tutorial

Java continue statement can be used in any of the loop structures. It causes a loop to jump to the next iteration of the loop immediately. In the  for loop, the continue keyword causes control to jump to the update statement quickly. In the  while loop or  do-while loop, control immediately jumps to the Boolean expression.

Java Continue Statement

You have already seen a break statement used in the earlier chapter of this tutorial. It was used to “jump out” of the switch statement.

The break statement can also be used to jump out of the loop.

Continue statement is mostly used inside loops. Whenever it is encountered inside the loop, control directly jumps to the beginning of the loop for the next iteration, skipping the execution of statements inside the loop’s body for the current iteration.

See the following syntax.

continue;

#java #java continue #continue statement

Annalise  Hyatt

Annalise Hyatt

1595044200

Bash if..else Statement

In this tutorial, we will walk you through the basics of the Bash if statement and show you how to use it in your shell scripts.

Decision making is one of the most fundamental concepts of computer programming. Like in any other programming language, ifif..elseif..elif..else and nested if statements in Bash can be used to execute code based on a certain condition.

if Statement

Bash if conditionals can have different forms. The most basic if statement takes the following form:

if TEST-COMMAND
then
  STATEMENTS
fi

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The if statement starts with the if keyword followed by the conditional expression and the then keyword. The statement ends with the fi keyword.

If the TEST-COMMAND evaluates to True, the STATEMENTS gets executed. If TEST-COMMAND returns False, nothing happens, the STATEMENTS gets ignored.

In general, it is a good practice to always indent your code and separate code blocks with blank lines. Most people choose to use either 4-space or 2-space indentation. Indentations and blank lines make your code more readable and organized.

Let’s look at the following example script that checks whether a given number is greater than 10:

#!/bin/bash

echo -n "Enter a number: "
read VAR

if [[ $VAR -gt 10 ]]
then
  echo "The variable is greater than 10."
fi

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Save the code in a file and run it from the command line:

bash test.sh

#bash #statement