Marlee  Carter

Marlee Carter

1623376510

AIOps Done Right: Delivery Automation for DevOps and SREs

AIOps has the potential to drive significant business value by enabling DevOps and site reliability engineering (SRE) teams to create better, more secure software, faster — if organizations take the right approach. But many simply aren’t leveraging AIOps correctly and are not maximizing its potential. In my previous article, I highlighted how long-term reliance on “Gen 1” AIOps solutions — older tools that may have worked for the IT environments of years ago — contributes to this. These tools are out of sync with today’s more dynamic multicloud environments, where changes happen too fast and production deployments occur too often for older machine learning algorithms to keep up.

In that piece, I shared one example of how organizations can start executing AIOps the right way by shifting AIOps “left” to create more test-driven operations. Now I want to delve into another use case that highlights the value of AIOps done right: scaling and improving delivery automation.

Many organizations have already begun automating their delivery pipelines through tools like Azure DevOps, GitLab Pipelines, GitHub Actions, Argo, Tekton, and Jenkins. AIOps can further accelerate this process, empowering DevOps and SRE teams to put higher-quality code into production and increase the throughput of their delivery pipelines…

There are two essential ways to integrate AIOps solutions into delivery automation: pushing data on deployment and configuration changes into the AIOps solution, or pulling AIOps-supported answers to facilitate more data-driven decision-making around software delivery.

#devops #machine learning #sres #aiops

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AIOps Done Right: Delivery Automation for DevOps and SREs
Madelyn  Frami

Madelyn Frami

1599821640

DevOps Automation: How to Apply Automation Into Your Software Delivery Process

It seems that nowadays, DevOps can mean many different things. As a DevOps expert at OutSystems, whenever I’m asked what this practice is all about, I like to say that it’s a way to deliver value faster to your end-users. More than a skill, a job role, or a tool, DevOps is a culture-shifting paradigm.

It’s about speeding up the flow of delivering software changes to your production environments and amplifying the feedback loops in your delivery pipeline so that you can catch problems early on during your development stage and act upon them quickly. This is why you always see practices like CI/CD and test automation closely associated with DevOps.

But it is also about reinforcing the collaboration between developers and operations, breaking organizational silos, driving innovation through experimentation, and measuring the business impact of each change so that you can iterate on top of that.

I recently discussed how to adopt DevOps automation in your software delivery process in a TechTalk. So if you want to learn more about the subject, I invite you to take a look.

Why Automate in DevOps?

DevOps automation’s greatest benefit is that you increase the speed and agility to deliver and change applications while removing bottlenecks and replacing manual tasks with automation. On top of this, automation introduces process standardization which further reduces the chance of errors or oversights that can occur when performing manual tasks.

Just look at a typical change request handling process. Your customer sends your operations team an email with some feedback to incorporate into the app. The ops team shares the message with the dev team that starts working on it. Once done, the new app version goes to the testing team, who, after testing it, shares its feedback with the development team again, until the app is finally deployed.

From process gaps and manual interventions to communication delays and miscommunication, many things can go wrong in a simple change request. By automating your DevOps processes, you’re able to close some of those gaps.

DevOps automation brings together the tools used by different stakeholders from different phases of the software delivery cycle, while ensuring enhanced transparency, quick releases, and easing further deployment.

DevOps lifecycle

#devops #automation #application development #devops best practices #software delivery #ci/cd pipeline #low-code #outsystems #devops automation testing #devops toolchain

Marlee  Carter

Marlee Carter

1623376510

AIOps Done Right: Delivery Automation for DevOps and SREs

AIOps has the potential to drive significant business value by enabling DevOps and site reliability engineering (SRE) teams to create better, more secure software, faster — if organizations take the right approach. But many simply aren’t leveraging AIOps correctly and are not maximizing its potential. In my previous article, I highlighted how long-term reliance on “Gen 1” AIOps solutions — older tools that may have worked for the IT environments of years ago — contributes to this. These tools are out of sync with today’s more dynamic multicloud environments, where changes happen too fast and production deployments occur too often for older machine learning algorithms to keep up.

In that piece, I shared one example of how organizations can start executing AIOps the right way by shifting AIOps “left” to create more test-driven operations. Now I want to delve into another use case that highlights the value of AIOps done right: scaling and improving delivery automation.

Many organizations have already begun automating their delivery pipelines through tools like Azure DevOps, GitLab Pipelines, GitHub Actions, Argo, Tekton, and Jenkins. AIOps can further accelerate this process, empowering DevOps and SRE teams to put higher-quality code into production and increase the throughput of their delivery pipelines…

There are two essential ways to integrate AIOps solutions into delivery automation: pushing data on deployment and configuration changes into the AIOps solution, or pulling AIOps-supported answers to facilitate more data-driven decision-making around software delivery.

#devops #machine learning #sres #aiops

How to Extend your DevOps Strategy For Success in the Cloud?

DevOps and Cloud computing are joined at the hip, now that fact is well appreciated by the organizations that engaged in SaaS cloud and developed applications in the Cloud. During the COVID crisis period, most of the organizations have started using cloud computing services and implementing a cloud-first strategy to establish their remote operations. Similarly, the extended DevOps strategy will make the development process more agile with automated test cases.

According to the survey in EMEA, IT decision-makers have observed a 129%* improvement in the overall software development process when performing DevOps on the Cloud. This success result was just 81% when practicing only DevOps and 67%* when leveraging Cloud without DevOps. Not only that, but the practice has also made the software predictability better, improve the customer experience as well as speed up software delivery 2.6* times faster.

3 Core Principle to fit DevOps Strategy

If you consider implementing DevOps in concert with the Cloud, then the

below core principle will guide you to utilize the strategy.

  • It is indispensable to follow a continuous process, including all stages from Dev to deploy with the help of auto-provisioning resources of the target platform.
  • The team always keeps an eye on major and minor application changes that can typically appear within a few hours of development to operation. However, the support of unlimited resource provisioning is needed at the stage of deployment.
  • Cloud or hybrid configuration can associate this process, but you must confirm that configuration should support multiple cloud brands like Microsoft, AWS, Google, any public and private cloud models.

Guide to Remold Business with DevOps and Cloud

Companies are now re-inventing themselves to become better at sensing the next big thing their customers need and finding ways with the Cloud based DevOps to get ahead of the competition.

#devops #devops-principles #azure-devops #devops-transformation #good-company #devops-tools #devops-top-story #devops-infrastructure

Giles  Goodwin

Giles Goodwin

1600761954

Why is database continuous integration important?

Why is database continuous integration important?

A very common tenet used when building out a DevOps style approach to automated deployment is the concept of failing fast. You want to identify issues with the changes in your code and structures as early as possible to protect the production environment. One of the most common methods to meet this requirement is setting up a Continuous Integration (CI) environment. The need for CI is not only for application code. Integrating changes to database code and components as often as possible and testing the results of those changes makes problems visible early and fast.

CI doesn’t get rid of bugs, but it does make them dramatically easier to find and remove if the team can be sure that the cause is one of the changes that were made since the last successful integration. If a developer’s code has introduced an error or has caused another developer’s previously working piece of code to fail, then the team knows immediately. No further integrations occur until the issue is fixed.

Why is integration so important?

All applications are made up of components. Even an application hand-crafted from procedural code will depend on third-party components, frameworks, libraries, operating-system interfaces, data sources and databases. At the other extreme, the custom application could be a mashup of standard off-the-shelf applications.

All components are liable to upgrades and changes, especially during active development. Each time any component of an application changes to a new version, you must perform a complete build on all parts of the application that rely on that component, followed by integration, with its integration tests. With a rapidly changing application, integration must be continuous to prove, continuously, that nothing has been broken as a result of any change.

Any change to the application code requires integration, as does any change to a third-party component. Where does the database fit? From the application-perspective, the database is just another component, and a typical corporate application can be dependent on a handful of databases. A database change merely triggers the same work as any other component. The application integration tests must prove that all database access methods continue to perform correctly, according to the database interface specification.

From the database perspective, it is, in effect, an application, with its own hierarchy of components on which it depends. Just as for an application, any change to the database code or components should prompt a fresh build, followed by integration and its tests.

The purpose of Database CI, then, is precisely the same as for application CI. The development team establish a working version of the database very early in the development cycle and then continue to verify regularly that it remains in a working state as they expand and refactor the schema and database code objects. Developers integrate new and changed code into a shared version control repository several times a day. Development proceeds in small steps. Developers first write the tests that, if passed, will prove that a small new piece of functionality works. They then implement the code to make the tests pass. When the tests pass, they commit the code to “trunk” in the shared VCS, and their “commit tests” are added to the broader suite of tests for the application. Each commit, or check-in, is then verified by an automated database build or migration, and subsequent testing, allowing teams to detect problems early.

#devops #editorials #homepage #automate #automated delivery #automation #continuous integration #devops

DevOps Basics: What You Should Know

Once an industry term becomes popular, particularly in technology, it can be difficult to get an accurate definition. Everyone assumes that the basics are common knowledge and moves on. However, if your company has been discussing DevOps, or if you are interested in learning more about it, here are some basics you should know.

What Is DevOps?

DevOps refers to the restructuring of the traditional software application cycle to support Agile development and continuous improvement/continuous delivery. Traditionally, the software was created in large-scale, monolithic bundles. New features and new releases were created in large packages and released in full-scale, infrequent, major deployments.

This structure is no longer effective in the modern business environment. Companies are under increasing pressure to be agile. They must respond rapidly to changes in the business environment to remain competitive. Software development needs to be completely changed as a process so that incremental improvements can be made frequently – ideally, several times per day.

However, changing a development lifecycle completely requires major changes – in people and culture, process, and enabling tooling – to be effective. DevOps was created by the breaking down of cycles between development and operations, combining two separate functions in application development. These changes intend to support agile, secure, continuous improvements, and frequent releases.

#devops #devops adoption #devops benefits #q& #a #devops goals #devops migration #devops questions