Juanita  Apio

Juanita Apio

1623180540

SQL vs NoSQL and SQL to NoSQL Migration

Overview

Given the choice of a Relational Database (RDBMS) vs a NoSQL database, it has become more important to select the right type of database for storing data. Not all the requirements fit in a NoSQL database or an RDBMS. RDBMSs are mainly related to managing, storing, and manipulating structured data where the data format, columns, data type, attributes, and schema are fixed, and the relationship between entities needs to be consistently maintained.

SQL is a common query language used when dealing with an RDBMS. Using an RDBMS is a choice for storing transactional data or records where the ACID (Atomicity, Consistency, Isolation, Durability) proprieties of transactions must be provided by an underlying database. An RDBMS is also a choice where the security and accessibility of data are of utmost importance. Typical use cases are financial records, financial transactions, OLTP, ERP, CRM systems, e-commerce applications, etc.

NoSQL (sometimes referred to as Not only SQL, non-SQL or non-relational) is a database that is suitable for managing data that is non-relational, i.e. not structured in tabular format or have fixed data type formats and variables that do not possess tabular relationships. There are various types of NoSQL databases that exist, like key-value, document-based, column-based, and graph-based. When it comes to scalability and performance of unstructured data, NoSQL is the obvious choice.

In a recent development, a few graph databases provide the options to store transactions adhering to ACID properties, but they are still in the early phases of adoption. Typical uses cases of NoSQL include data that is largely unstructured and needs flexibility in data models like content management, personalization, web search engines, storing large users profiles from heterogeneous sources, data streams, documents, digital communication (Storing messages, chats), big data, analytics, machine learning, and storing IoT data.

It becomes imperative to choose the right type of database, and, if required, migrate the exiting RDBMS database to NoSQL to meet the new dynamics of business requirements, scalability, and performance aspects. The below section will help in deciding the right database for your requirement.

1. Database Decision Tree

2. Migration From RDBMS Data Sources to NoSQL DBs

If there are existing RDBMS databases that are storing content, documents, files, or have unstructured data, then there are significant advantages in moving such databases to NoSQL databases. Benefits include cost benefits, performance, scalability, future proof for changes, reducing conversion jobs, and extensive supportability for analytics.

2.1 Migration Tools From Traditional RDBMS DB to AWS DynamoDB

AWS Database Migration Service (AWS DMS) can migrate data from most widely-used commercial RDBMSs and open-source databases to similar databases (homogeneous) or different database platforms (heterogeneous) including transforming RDBMS to DynamoDB or Cassandra to DynamoDB or MongoDB to DynamoDB databases.

2.2 Migration Tools for RDBMS DB to Azure Cosmos DB

The Azure Cosmos DB emulator and the Azure Cosmos DB Data Migration tool can be used to migrate from an MSSQL database to Cosmos DB. This tool can also help to migrate if the source data is in CSV or JSON object formats.

Azure Database Migration Service (DMS), Cosmos DB, and the API for MongoDB can be used to migrate MongoDB to CosmosDB.

2.3 Migration From SQL to Google DataStore

Google has NoSQL services, Cloud Datastore, and Bigtable. Cloud Datastore is now being enhanced to recently released service called Firestore.

There are not many tools and documentation support from Google on migration to Firestore or Bigtable from RDBMS databases or different NoSQL platforms. Cloud SQL, a managed RDBMS from Google, has built-in features to migrate some of traditional RDBMS to CloudSQL. Cloud Spanner is another managed RDBMS. Migrations involve mainly manual processes.

#nosql #aws #azure #sql #nosql

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SQL vs NoSQL and SQL to NoSQL Migration
Cayla  Erdman

Cayla Erdman

1594369800

Introduction to Structured Query Language SQL pdf

SQL stands for Structured Query Language. SQL is a scripting language expected to store, control, and inquiry information put away in social databases. The main manifestation of SQL showed up in 1974, when a gathering in IBM built up the principal model of a social database. The primary business social database was discharged by Relational Software later turning out to be Oracle.

Models for SQL exist. In any case, the SQL that can be utilized on every last one of the major RDBMS today is in various flavors. This is because of two reasons:

1. The SQL order standard is genuinely intricate, and it isn’t handy to actualize the whole standard.

2. Every database seller needs an approach to separate its item from others.

Right now, contrasts are noted where fitting.

#programming books #beginning sql pdf #commands sql #download free sql full book pdf #introduction to sql pdf #introduction to sql ppt #introduction to sql #practical sql pdf #sql commands pdf with examples free download #sql commands #sql free bool download #sql guide #sql language #sql pdf #sql ppt #sql programming language #sql tutorial for beginners #sql tutorial pdf #sql #structured query language pdf #structured query language ppt #structured query language

Juanita  Apio

Juanita Apio

1623180540

SQL vs NoSQL and SQL to NoSQL Migration

Overview

Given the choice of a Relational Database (RDBMS) vs a NoSQL database, it has become more important to select the right type of database for storing data. Not all the requirements fit in a NoSQL database or an RDBMS. RDBMSs are mainly related to managing, storing, and manipulating structured data where the data format, columns, data type, attributes, and schema are fixed, and the relationship between entities needs to be consistently maintained.

SQL is a common query language used when dealing with an RDBMS. Using an RDBMS is a choice for storing transactional data or records where the ACID (Atomicity, Consistency, Isolation, Durability) proprieties of transactions must be provided by an underlying database. An RDBMS is also a choice where the security and accessibility of data are of utmost importance. Typical use cases are financial records, financial transactions, OLTP, ERP, CRM systems, e-commerce applications, etc.

NoSQL (sometimes referred to as Not only SQL, non-SQL or non-relational) is a database that is suitable for managing data that is non-relational, i.e. not structured in tabular format or have fixed data type formats and variables that do not possess tabular relationships. There are various types of NoSQL databases that exist, like key-value, document-based, column-based, and graph-based. When it comes to scalability and performance of unstructured data, NoSQL is the obvious choice.

In a recent development, a few graph databases provide the options to store transactions adhering to ACID properties, but they are still in the early phases of adoption. Typical uses cases of NoSQL include data that is largely unstructured and needs flexibility in data models like content management, personalization, web search engines, storing large users profiles from heterogeneous sources, data streams, documents, digital communication (Storing messages, chats), big data, analytics, machine learning, and storing IoT data.

It becomes imperative to choose the right type of database, and, if required, migrate the exiting RDBMS database to NoSQL to meet the new dynamics of business requirements, scalability, and performance aspects. The below section will help in deciding the right database for your requirement.

1. Database Decision Tree

2. Migration From RDBMS Data Sources to NoSQL DBs

If there are existing RDBMS databases that are storing content, documents, files, or have unstructured data, then there are significant advantages in moving such databases to NoSQL databases. Benefits include cost benefits, performance, scalability, future proof for changes, reducing conversion jobs, and extensive supportability for analytics.

2.1 Migration Tools From Traditional RDBMS DB to AWS DynamoDB

AWS Database Migration Service (AWS DMS) can migrate data from most widely-used commercial RDBMSs and open-source databases to similar databases (homogeneous) or different database platforms (heterogeneous) including transforming RDBMS to DynamoDB or Cassandra to DynamoDB or MongoDB to DynamoDB databases.

2.2 Migration Tools for RDBMS DB to Azure Cosmos DB

The Azure Cosmos DB emulator and the Azure Cosmos DB Data Migration tool can be used to migrate from an MSSQL database to Cosmos DB. This tool can also help to migrate if the source data is in CSV or JSON object formats.

Azure Database Migration Service (DMS), Cosmos DB, and the API for MongoDB can be used to migrate MongoDB to CosmosDB.

2.3 Migration From SQL to Google DataStore

Google has NoSQL services, Cloud Datastore, and Bigtable. Cloud Datastore is now being enhanced to recently released service called Firestore.

There are not many tools and documentation support from Google on migration to Firestore or Bigtable from RDBMS databases or different NoSQL platforms. Cloud SQL, a managed RDBMS from Google, has built-in features to migrate some of traditional RDBMS to CloudSQL. Cloud Spanner is another managed RDBMS. Migrations involve mainly manual processes.

#nosql #aws #azure #sql #nosql

Cayla  Erdman

Cayla Erdman

1596441660

Welcome Back the T-SQL Debugger with SQL Complete – SQL Debugger

When you develop large chunks of T-SQL code with the help of the SQL Server Management Studio tool, it is essential to test the “Live” behavior of your code by making sure that each small piece of code works fine and being able to allocate any error message that may cause a failure within that code.

The easiest way to perform that would be to use the T-SQL debugger feature, which used to be built-in over the SQL Server Management Studio tool. But since the T-SQL debugger feature was removed completely from SQL Server Management Studio 18 and later editions, we need a replacement for that feature. This is because we cannot keep using the old versions of SSMS just to support the T-SQL Debugger feature without “enjoying” the new features and bug fixes that are released in the new SSMS versions.

If you plan to wait for SSMS to bring back the T-SQL Debugger feature, vote in the Put Debugger back into SSMS 18 to ask Microsoft to reintroduce it.

As for me, I searched for an alternative tool for a T-SQL Debugger SSMS built-in feature and found that Devart company rolled out a new T-SQL Debugger feature to version 6.4 of SQL – Complete tool. SQL Complete is an add-in for Visual Studio and SSMS that offers scripts autocompletion capabilities, which help develop and debug your SQL database project.

The SQL Debugger feature of SQL Complete allows you to check the execution of your scripts, procedures, functions, and triggers step by step by adding breakpoints to the lines where you plan to start, suspend, evaluate, step through, and then to continue the execution of your script.

You can download SQL Complete from the dbForge Download page and install it on your machine using a straight-forward installation wizard. The wizard will ask you to specify the installation path for the SQL Complete tool and the versions of SSMS and Visual Studio that you plan to install the SQL Complete on, as an add-in, from the versions that are installed on your machine, as shown below:

Once SQL Complete is fully installed on your machine, the dbForge SQL Complete installation wizard will notify you of whether the installation was completed successfully or the wizard faced any specific issue that you can troubleshoot and fix easily. If there are no issues, the wizard will provide you with an option to open the SSMS tool and start using the SQL Complete tool, as displayed below:

When you open SSMS, you will see a new “Debug” tools menu, under which you can navigate the SQL Debugger feature options. Besides, you will see a list of icons that will be used to control the debug mode of the T-SQL query at the leftmost side of the SSMS tool. If you cannot see the list, you can go to View -> Toolbars -> Debugger to make these icons visible.

During the debugging session, the SQL Debugger icons will be as follows:

The functionality of these icons within the SQL Debugger can be summarized as:

  • Adding Breakpoints to control the execution pause of the T-SQL script at a specific statement allows you to check the debugging information of the T-SQL statements such as the values for the parameters and the variables.
  • Step Into is “navigate” through the script statements one by one, allowing you to check how each statement behaves.
  • Step Over is “execute” a specific stored procedure if you are sure that it contains no error.
  • Step Out is “return” from the stored procedure, function, or trigger to the main debugging window.
  • Continue executing the script until reaching the next breakpoint.
  • Stop Debugging is “terminate” the debugging session.
  • Restart “stop and start” the current debugging session.

#sql server #sql #sql debugger #sql server #sql server stored procedure #ssms #t-sql queries

Ruth  Nabimanya

Ruth Nabimanya

1622304060

Migration Makes My Skin Crawl: From SQL to NoSQL

Listen to the Hacker Noon Podcast on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle PodcastsStitcher, or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Is database migration as scary as it sounds? Amy Tom talks to Matt Groves, Senior Product Marketing Manager at Couchbase, and Curt Gratz, Co-Owner of CKH Consulting. Amy, Matt, and Curt talk about migrating from a SQL database to a NoSQL database, the challenges developers face when shit hits the fan, and assessing the use case of your database. Curt is a Couchbase user and is well-versed in database migration; he shares how to avoid disaster migration and what he’s learned using a NoSQL database. Matt slams down the expert advice on what “NoSQL” encompasses, and how to convert your data structures.

In this episode, Amy, Matt, and Curt discuss:

  • What considerations are behind the decision between using a SQL database over a NoSQL database? (05:05)
  • When is NoSQL an inappropriate solution? Matt says it depends on the amount of data and your need for adaptation/personalization (06:42)
  • What are the challenges facing developers moving from SQL to NoSQL? (08:48)
  • What the heck is ETL? Curt explains that “ETL-ing data” means transforming your data from one place to another (10:10)Can we automatically convert the contents of a SQL Server database to a NoSQL database? Matt talks about his automatic translation project that lifts and shifts data into Couchbase (11:30)
  • What data structures need to be converted when migrating from SQL to NoSQL? (13:12)
  • If NoSQL is schema-less, do the schemas also migrate over? Long story short, Matt says to think of NoSQL as “schema flexible” instead of “schema-less” (15:57)
  • What’s the deal with stored procedures and how does that impact NoSQL database operations? (17:30)
  • What about ACID and atomic operations when migrating to NoSQL? (20:46)
  • What happens when shit hits the fan in the migration process? Can you lose your whole database? Curt talks about disaster migration scenarios and how to solve them (23:07)
  • What about the process of migrating from one NoSQL database to another? (29:05)
  • What is Curt and Matt’s advice to first-time migrators? Curt says to ask yourself, “why am I migrating?”, and Matt says to expect things to go wrong (30:52)

#hackernoon-podcast #podcast #sql #nosql #database #migration #data-migration #database-administration

Adaline  Kulas

Adaline Kulas

1594166040

What are the benefits of cloud migration? Reasons you should migrate

The moving of applications, databases and other business elements from the local server to the cloud server called cloud migration. This article will deal with migration techniques, requirement and the benefits of cloud migration.

In simple terms, moving from local to the public cloud server is called cloud migration. Gartner says 17.5% revenue growth as promised in cloud migration and also has a forecast for 2022 as shown in the following image.

#cloud computing services #cloud migration #all #cloud #cloud migration strategy #enterprise cloud migration strategy #business benefits of cloud migration #key benefits of cloud migration #benefits of cloud migration #types of cloud migration