How to Visualize High Frequency Financial Data Using Plotly and R

In this article I show how to use the Plotly package to visualize financial data in high frequency using R. To perform analysis and develop trading algorithms, it is necessary to obtain data in very high frequencies to be able to take quick and accurate actions to maximize the profits earned in the trades.
Today, more than 40% of the operations carried out on American stock exchanges are carried out by robots programmed to analyze the market and buy or sell according to market indicators. Today we are going to learn how to create a candlestick chart from a Brazilian asset data called “mini-index,” widely used by daytraders.

#stock-market #data-visualization #data-analysis #towards-data-science #data-science

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How to Visualize High Frequency Financial Data Using Plotly and R
Anil  Sakhiya

Anil Sakhiya

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Exploratory Data Analysis(EDA) with Python

Exploratory Data Analysis Tutorial | Basics of EDA with Python

Exploratory data analysis is used by data scientists to analyze and investigate data sets and summarize their main characteristics, often employing data visualization methods. It helps determine how best to manipulate data sources to get the answers you need, making it easier for data scientists to discover patterns, spot anomalies, test a hypothesis, or check assumptions. EDA is primarily used to see what data can reveal beyond the formal modeling or hypothesis testing task and provides a better understanding of data set variables and the relationships between them. It can also help determine if the statistical techniques you are considering for data analysis are appropriate or not.

🔹 Topics Covered:
00:00:00 Basics of EDA with Python
01:40:10 Multiple Variate Analysis
02:30:26 Outlier Detection
03:44:48 Cricket World Cup Analysis using Exploratory Data Analysis


Learning the basics of Exploratory Data Analysis using Python with Numpy, Matplotlib, and Pandas.

What is Exploratory Data Analysis(EDA)?

If we want to explain EDA in simple terms, it means trying to understand the given data much better, so that we can make some sense out of it.

We can find a more formal definition in Wikipedia.

In statistics, exploratory data analysis is an approach to analyzing data sets to summarize their main characteristics, often with visual methods. A statistical model can be used or not, but primarily EDA is for seeing what the data can tell us beyond the formal modeling or hypothesis testing task.

EDA in Python uses data visualization to draw meaningful patterns and insights. It also involves the preparation of data sets for analysis by removing irregularities in the data.

Based on the results of EDA, companies also make business decisions, which can have repercussions later.

  • If EDA is not done properly then it can hamper the further steps in the machine learning model building process.
  • If done well, it may improve the efficacy of everything we do next.

In this article we’ll see about the following topics:

  1. Data Sourcing
  2. Data Cleaning
  3. Univariate analysis
  4. Bivariate analysis
  5. Multivariate analysis

1. Data Sourcing

Data Sourcing is the process of finding and loading the data into our system. Broadly there are two ways in which we can find data.

  1. Private Data
  2. Public Data

Private Data

As the name suggests, private data is given by private organizations. There are some security and privacy concerns attached to it. This type of data is used for mainly organizations internal analysis.

Public Data

This type of Data is available to everyone. We can find this in government websites and public organizations etc. Anyone can access this data, we do not need any special permissions or approval.

We can get public data on the following sites.

The very first step of EDA is Data Sourcing, we have seen how we can access data and load into our system. Now, the next step is how to clean the data.

2. Data Cleaning

After completing the Data Sourcing, the next step in the process of EDA is Data Cleaning. It is very important to get rid of the irregularities and clean the data after sourcing it into our system.

Irregularities are of different types of data.

  • Missing Values
  • Incorrect Format
  • Incorrect Headers
  • Anomalies/Outliers

To perform the data cleaning we are using a sample data set, which can be found here.

We are using Jupyter Notebook for analysis.

First, let’s import the necessary libraries and store the data in our system for analysis.

#import the useful libraries.
import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
import seaborn as sns
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
%matplotlib inline

# Read the data set of "Marketing Analysis" in data.
data= pd.read_csv("marketing_analysis.csv")

# Printing the data
data

Now, the data set looks like this,

If we observe the above dataset, there are some discrepancies in the Column header for the first 2 rows. The correct data is from the index number 1. So, we have to fix the first two rows.

This is called Fixing the Rows and Columns. Let’s ignore the first two rows and load the data again.

#import the useful libraries.
import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
import seaborn as sns
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
%matplotlib inline

# Read the file in data without first two rows as it is of no use.
data = pd.read_csv("marketing_analysis.csv",skiprows = 2)

#print the head of the data frame.
data.head()

Now, the dataset looks like this, and it makes more sense.

Dataset after fixing the rows and columns

Following are the steps to be taken while Fixing Rows and Columns:

  1. Delete Summary Rows and Columns in the Dataset.
  2. Delete Header and Footer Rows on every page.
  3. Delete Extra Rows like blank rows, page numbers, etc.
  4. We can merge different columns if it makes for better understanding of the data
  5. Similarly, we can also split one column into multiple columns based on our requirements or understanding.
  6. Add Column names, it is very important to have column names to the dataset.

Now if we observe the above dataset, the customerid column has of no importance to our analysis, and also the jobedu column has both the information of job and education in it.

So, what we’ll do is, we’ll drop the customerid column and we’ll split the jobedu column into two other columns job and education and after that, we’ll drop the jobedu column as well.

# Drop the customer id as it is of no use.
data.drop('customerid', axis = 1, inplace = True)

#Extract job  & Education in newly from "jobedu" column.
data['job']= data["jobedu"].apply(lambda x: x.split(",")[0])
data['education']= data["jobedu"].apply(lambda x: x.split(",")[1])

# Drop the "jobedu" column from the dataframe.
data.drop('jobedu', axis = 1, inplace = True)

# Printing the Dataset
data

Now, the dataset looks like this,

Dropping Customerid and jobedu columns and adding job and education columns

Missing Values

If there are missing values in the Dataset before doing any statistical analysis, we need to handle those missing values.

There are mainly three types of missing values.

  1. MCAR(Missing completely at random): These values do not depend on any other features.
  2. MAR(Missing at random): These values may be dependent on some other features.
  3. MNAR(Missing not at random): These missing values have some reason for why they are missing.

Let’s see which columns have missing values in the dataset.

# Checking the missing values
data.isnull().sum()

The output will be,

As we can see three columns contain missing values. Let’s see how to handle the missing values. We can handle missing values by dropping the missing records or by imputing the values.

Drop the missing Values

Let’s handle missing values in the age column.

# Dropping the records with age missing in data dataframe.
data = data[~data.age.isnull()].copy()

# Checking the missing values in the dataset.
data.isnull().sum()

Let’s check the missing values in the dataset now.

Let’s impute values to the missing values for the month column.

Since the month column is of an object type, let’s calculate the mode of that column and impute those values to the missing values.

# Find the mode of month in data
month_mode = data.month.mode()[0]

# Fill the missing values with mode value of month in data.
data.month.fillna(month_mode, inplace = True)

# Let's see the null values in the month column.
data.month.isnull().sum()

Now output is,

# Mode of month is
'may, 2017'
# Null values in month column after imputing with mode
0

Handling the missing values in the Response column. Since, our target column is Response Column, if we impute the values to this column it’ll affect our analysis. So, it is better to drop the missing values from Response Column.

#drop the records with response missing in data.
data = data[~data.response.isnull()].copy()
# Calculate the missing values in each column of data frame
data.isnull().sum()

Let’s check whether the missing values in the dataset have been handled or not,

All the missing values have been handled

We can also, fill the missing values as ‘NaN’ so that while doing any statistical analysis, it won’t affect the outcome.

Handling Outliers

We have seen how to fix missing values, now let’s see how to handle outliers in the dataset.

Outliers are the values that are far beyond the next nearest data points.

There are two types of outliers:

  1. Univariate outliers: Univariate outliers are the data points whose values lie beyond the range of expected values based on one variable.
  2. Multivariate outliers: While plotting data, some values of one variable may not lie beyond the expected range, but when you plot the data with some other variable, these values may lie far from the expected value.

So, after understanding the causes of these outliers, we can handle them by dropping those records or imputing with the values or leaving them as is, if it makes more sense.

Standardizing Values

To perform data analysis on a set of values, we have to make sure the values in the same column should be on the same scale. For example, if the data contains the values of the top speed of different companies’ cars, then the whole column should be either in meters/sec scale or miles/sec scale.

Now, that we are clear on how to source and clean the data, let’s see how we can analyze the data.

3. Univariate Analysis

If we analyze data over a single variable/column from a dataset, it is known as Univariate Analysis.

Categorical Unordered Univariate Analysis:

An unordered variable is a categorical variable that has no defined order. If we take our data as an example, the job column in the dataset is divided into many sub-categories like technician, blue-collar, services, management, etc. There is no weight or measure given to any value in the ‘job’ column.

Now, let’s analyze the job category by using plots. Since Job is a category, we will plot the bar plot.

# Let's calculate the percentage of each job status category.
data.job.value_counts(normalize=True)

#plot the bar graph of percentage job categories
data.job.value_counts(normalize=True).plot.barh()
plt.show()

The output looks like this,

By the above bar plot, we can infer that the data set contains more number of blue-collar workers compared to other categories.

Categorical Ordered Univariate Analysis:

Ordered variables are those variables that have a natural rank of order. Some examples of categorical ordered variables from our dataset are:

  • Month: Jan, Feb, March……
  • Education: Primary, Secondary,……

Now, let’s analyze the Education Variable from the dataset. Since we’ve already seen a bar plot, let’s see how a Pie Chart looks like.

#calculate the percentage of each education category.
data.education.value_counts(normalize=True)

#plot the pie chart of education categories
data.education.value_counts(normalize=True).plot.pie()
plt.show()

The output will be,

By the above analysis, we can infer that the data set has a large number of them belongs to secondary education after that tertiary and next primary. Also, a very small percentage of them have been unknown.

This is how we analyze univariate categorical analysis. If the column or variable is of numerical then we’ll analyze by calculating its mean, median, std, etc. We can get those values by using the describe function.

data.salary.describe()

The output will be,

4. Bivariate Analysis

If we analyze data by taking two variables/columns into consideration from a dataset, it is known as Bivariate Analysis.

a) Numeric-Numeric Analysis:

Analyzing the two numeric variables from a dataset is known as numeric-numeric analysis. We can analyze it in three different ways.

  • Scatter Plot
  • Pair Plot
  • Correlation Matrix

Scatter Plot

Let’s take three columns ‘Balance’, ‘Age’ and ‘Salary’ from our dataset and see what we can infer by plotting to scatter plot between salary balance and age balance

#plot the scatter plot of balance and salary variable in data
plt.scatter(data.salary,data.balance)
plt.show()

#plot the scatter plot of balance and age variable in data
data.plot.scatter(x="age",y="balance")
plt.show()

Now, the scatter plots looks like,

Pair Plot

Now, let’s plot Pair Plots for the three columns we used in plotting Scatter plots. We’ll use the seaborn library for plotting Pair Plots.

#plot the pair plot of salary, balance and age in data dataframe.
sns.pairplot(data = data, vars=['salary','balance','age'])
plt.show()

The Pair Plot looks like this,

Correlation Matrix

Since we cannot use more than two variables as x-axis and y-axis in Scatter and Pair Plots, it is difficult to see the relation between three numerical variables in a single graph. In those cases, we’ll use the correlation matrix.

# Creating a matrix using age, salry, balance as rows and columns
data[['age','salary','balance']].corr()

#plot the correlation matrix of salary, balance and age in data dataframe.
sns.heatmap(data[['age','salary','balance']].corr(), annot=True, cmap = 'Reds')
plt.show()

First, we created a matrix using age, salary, and balance. After that, we are plotting the heatmap using the seaborn library of the matrix.

b) Numeric - Categorical Analysis

Analyzing the one numeric variable and one categorical variable from a dataset is known as numeric-categorical analysis. We analyze them mainly using mean, median, and box plots.

Let’s take salary and response columns from our dataset.

First check for mean value using groupby

#groupby the response to find the mean of the salary with response no & yes separately.
data.groupby('response')['salary'].mean()

The output will be,

There is not much of a difference between the yes and no response based on the salary.

Let’s calculate the median,

#groupby the response to find the median of the salary with response no & yes separately.
data.groupby('response')['salary'].median()

The output will be,

By both mean and median we can say that the response of yes and no remains the same irrespective of the person’s salary. But, is it truly behaving like that, let’s plot the box plot for them and check the behavior.

#plot the box plot of salary for yes & no responses.
sns.boxplot(data.response, data.salary)
plt.show()

The box plot looks like this,

As we can see, when we plot the Box Plot, it paints a very different picture compared to mean and median. The IQR for customers who gave a positive response is on the higher salary side.

This is how we analyze Numeric-Categorical variables, we use mean, median, and Box Plots to draw some sort of conclusions.

c) Categorical — Categorical Analysis

Since our target variable/column is the Response rate, we’ll see how the different categories like Education, Marital Status, etc., are associated with the Response column. So instead of ‘Yes’ and ‘No’ we will convert them into ‘1’ and ‘0’, by doing that we’ll get the “Response Rate”.

#create response_rate of numerical data type where response "yes"= 1, "no"= 0
data['response_rate'] = np.where(data.response=='yes',1,0)
data.response_rate.value_counts()

The output looks like this,

Let’s see how the response rate varies for different categories in marital status.

#plot the bar graph of marital status with average value of response_rate
data.groupby('marital')['response_rate'].mean().plot.bar()
plt.show()

The graph looks like this,

By the above graph, we can infer that the positive response is more for Single status members in the data set. Similarly, we can plot the graphs for Loan vs Response rate, Housing Loans vs Response rate, etc.

5. Multivariate Analysis

If we analyze data by taking more than two variables/columns into consideration from a dataset, it is known as Multivariate Analysis.

Let’s see how ‘Education’, ‘Marital’, and ‘Response_rate’ vary with each other.

First, we’ll create a pivot table with the three columns and after that, we’ll create a heatmap.

result = pd.pivot_table(data=data, index='education', columns='marital',values='response_rate')
print(result)

#create heat map of education vs marital vs response_rate
sns.heatmap(result, annot=True, cmap = 'RdYlGn', center=0.117)
plt.show()

The Pivot table and heatmap looks like this,

Based on the Heatmap we can infer that the married people with primary education are less likely to respond positively for the survey and single people with tertiary education are most likely to respond positively to the survey.

Similarly, we can plot the graphs for Job vs marital vs response, Education vs poutcome vs response, etc.

Conclusion

This is how we’ll do Exploratory Data Analysis. Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA) helps us to look beyond the data. The more we explore the data, the more the insights we draw from it. As a data analyst, almost 80% of our time will be spent understanding data and solving various business problems through EDA.

Thank you for reading and Happy Coding!!!

#dataanalysis #python

CSharp REPL: A Command Line C# REPL with Syntax Highlighting

C# REPL

A cross-platform command line REPL for the rapid experimentation and exploration of C#. It supports intellisense, installing NuGet packages, and referencing local .NET projects and assemblies.

C# REPL screenshot 

(click to view animation)

C# REPL provides the following features:

  • Syntax highlighting via ANSI escape sequences
  • Intellisense with fly-out documentation
  • Nuget package installation
  • Reference local assemblies, solutions, and projects
  • Navigate to source via Source Link
  • IL disassembly (both Debug and Release mode)
  • Fast and flicker-free rendering. A "diff" algorithm is used to only render what's changed.

Installation

C# REPL is a .NET 6 global tool, and runs on Windows 10, Mac OS, and Linux. It can be installed via:

dotnet tool install -g csharprepl

If you're running on Mac OS Catalina (10.15) or later, make sure you follow any additional directions printed to the screen. You may need to update your PATH variable in order to use .NET global tools.

After installation is complete, run csharprepl to begin. C# REPL can be updated via dotnet tool update -g csharprepl.

Usage:

Run csharprepl from the command line to begin an interactive session. The default colorscheme uses the color palette defined by your terminal, but these colors can be changed using a theme.json file provided as a command line argument.

Evaluating Code

Type some C# into the prompt and press Enter to run it. The result, if any, will be printed:

> Console.WriteLine("Hello World")
Hello World

> DateTime.Now.AddDays(8)
[6/7/2021 5:13:00 PM]

To evaluate multiple lines of code, use Shift+Enter to insert a newline:

> var x = 5;
  var y = 8;
  x * y
40

Additionally, if the statement is not a "complete statement" a newline will automatically be inserted when Enter is pressed. For example, in the below code, the first line is not a syntactically complete statement, so when we press enter we'll go down to a new line:

> if (x == 5)
  | // caret position, after we press Enter on Line 1

Finally, pressing Ctrl+Enter will show a "detailed view" of the result. For example, for the DateTime.Now expression below, on the first line we pressed Enter, and on the second line we pressed Ctrl+Enter to view more detailed output:

> DateTime.Now // Pressing Enter shows a reasonable representation
[5/30/2021 5:13:00 PM]

> DateTime.Now // Pressing Ctrl+Enter shows a detailed representation
[5/30/2021 5:13:00 PM] {
  Date: [5/30/2021 12:00:00 AM],
  Day: 30,
  DayOfWeek: Sunday,
  DayOfYear: 150,
  Hour: 17,
  InternalKind: 9223372036854775808,
  InternalTicks: 637579915804530992,
  Kind: Local,
  Millisecond: 453,
  Minute: 13,
  Month: 5,
  Second: 0,
  Ticks: 637579915804530992,
  TimeOfDay: [17:13:00.4530992],
  Year: 2021,
  _dateData: 9860951952659306800
}

A note on semicolons: C# expressions do not require semicolons, but statements do. If a statement is missing a required semicolon, a newline will be added instead of trying to run the syntatically incomplete statement; simply type the semicolon to complete the statement.

> var now = DateTime.Now; // assignment statement, semicolon required

> DateTime.Now.AddDays(8) // expression, we don't need a semicolon
[6/7/2021 5:03:05 PM]

Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Basic Usage
    • Ctrl+C - Cancel current line
    • Ctrl+L - Clear screen
    • Enter - Evaluate the current line if it's a syntactically complete statement; otherwise add a newline
    • Control+Enter - Evaluate the current line, and return a more detailed representation of the result
    • Shift+Enter - Insert a new line (this does not currently work on Linux or Mac OS; Hopefully this will work in .NET 7)
    • Ctrl+Shift+C - Copy current line to clipboard
    • Ctrl+V, Shift+Insert, and Ctrl+Shift+V - Paste text to prompt. Automatically trims leading indent
  • Code Actions
    • F1 - Opens the MSDN documentation for the class/method under the caret (example)
    • F9 - Shows the IL (intermediate language) for the current statement in Debug mode.
    • Ctrl+F9 - Shows the IL for the current statement with Release mode optimizations.
    • F12 - Opens the source code in the browser for the class/method under the caret, if the assembly supports Source Link.
  • Autocompletion
    • Ctrl+Space - Open autocomplete menu. If there's a single option, pressing Ctrl+Space again will select the option
    • Enter, Right Arrow, Tab - Select active autocompletion option
    • Escape - closes autocomplete menu
  • Text Navigation
    • Home and End - Navigate to beginning of a single line and end of a single line, respectively
    • Ctrl+Home and Ctrl+End - Navigate to beginning of line and end across multiple lines in a multiline prompt, respectively
    • Arrows - Navigate characters within text
    • Ctrl+Arrows - Navigate words within text
    • Ctrl+Backspace - Delete previous word
    • Ctrl+Delete - Delete next word

Adding References

Use the #r command to add assembly or nuget references.

  • For assembly references, run #r "AssemblyName" or #r "path/to/assembly.dll"
  • For project references, run #r "path/to/project.csproj". Solution files (.sln) can also be referenced.
  • For nuget references, run #r "nuget: PackageName" to install the latest version of a package, or #r "nuget: PackageName, 13.0.5" to install a specific version (13.0.5 in this case).

Installing nuget packages

To run ASP.NET applications inside the REPL, start the csharprepl application with the --framework parameter, specifying the Microsoft.AspNetCore.App shared framework. Then, use the above #r command to reference the application DLL. See the Command Line Configuration section below for more details.

csharprepl --framework  Microsoft.AspNetCore.App

Command Line Configuration

The C# REPL supports multiple configuration flags to control startup, behavior, and appearance:

csharprepl [OPTIONS] [response-file.rsp] [script-file.csx] [-- <additional-arguments>]

Supported options are:

  • OPTIONS:
    • -r <dll> or --reference <dll>: Reference an assembly, project file, or nuget package. Can be specified multiple times. Uses the same syntax as #r statements inside the REPL. For example, csharprepl -r "nuget:Newtonsoft.Json" "path/to/myproj.csproj"
      • When an assembly or project is referenced, assemblies in the containing directory will be added to the assembly search path. This means that you don't need to manually add references to all of your assembly's dependencies (e.g. other references and nuget packages). Referencing the main entry assembly is enough.
    • -u <namespace> or --using <namespace>: Add a using statement. Can be specified multiple times.
    • -f <framework> or --framework <framework>: Reference a shared framework. The available shared frameworks depends on the local .NET installation, and can be useful when running an ASP.NET application from the REPL. Example frameworks are:
      • Microsoft.NETCore.App (default)
      • Microsoft.AspNetCore.All
      • Microsoft.AspNetCore.App
      • Microsoft.WindowsDesktop.App
    • -t <theme.json> or --theme <theme.json>: Read a theme file for syntax highlighting. This theme file associates C# syntax classifications with colors. The color values can be full RGB, or ANSI color names (defined in your terminal's theme). The NO_COLOR standard is supported.
    • --trace: Produce a trace file in the current directory that logs CSharpRepl internals. Useful for CSharpRepl bug reports.
    • -v or --version: Show version number and exit.
    • -h or --help: Show help and exit.
  • response-file.rsp: A filepath of an .rsp file, containing any of the above command line options.
  • script-file.csx: A filepath of a .csx file, containing lines of C# to evaluate before starting the REPL. Arguments to this script can be passed as <additional-arguments>, after a double hyphen (--), and will be available in a global args variable.

If you have dotnet-suggest enabled, all options can be tab-completed, including values provided to --framework and .NET namespaces provided to --using.

Integrating with other software

C# REPL is a standalone software application, but it can be useful to integrate it with other developer tools:

Windows Terminal

To add C# REPL as a menu entry in Windows Terminal, add the following profile to Windows Terminal's settings.json configuration file (under the JSON property profiles.list):

{
    "name": "C# REPL",
    "commandline": "csharprepl"
},

To get the exact colors shown in the screenshots in this README, install the Windows Terminal Dracula theme.

Visual Studio Code

To use the C# REPL with Visual Studio Code, simply run the csharprepl command in the Visual Studio Code terminal. To send commands to the REPL, use the built-in Terminal: Run Selected Text In Active Terminal command from the Command Palette (workbench.action.terminal.runSelectedText).

Visual Studio Code screenshot

Windows OS

To add the C# REPL to the Windows Start Menu for quick access, you can run the following PowerShell command, which will start C# REPL in Windows Terminal:

$shell = New-Object -ComObject WScript.Shell
$shortcut = $shell.CreateShortcut("$env:appdata\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu\Programs\csharprepl.lnk")
$shortcut.TargetPath = "wt.exe"
$shortcut.Arguments = "-w 0 nt csharprepl.exe"
$shortcut.Save()

You may also wish to add a shorter alias for C# REPL, which can be done by creating a .cmd file somewhere on your path. For example, put the following contents in C:\Users\username\.dotnet\tools\csr.cmd:

wt -w 0 nt csharprepl

This will allow you to launch C# REPL by running csr from anywhere that accepts Windows commands, like the Window Run dialog.

Comparison with other REPLs

This project is far from being the first REPL for C#. Here are some other projects; if this project doesn't suit you, another one might!

Visual Studio's C# Interactive pane is full-featured (it has syntax highlighting and intellisense) and is part of Visual Studio. This deep integration with Visual Studio is both a benefit from a workflow perspective, and a drawback as it's not cross-platform. As far as I know, the C# Interactive pane does not support NuGet packages or navigating to documentation/source code. Subjectively, it does not follow typical command line keybindings, so can feel a bit foreign.

csi.exe ships with C# and is a command line REPL. It's great because it's a cross platform REPL that comes out of the box, but it doesn't support syntax highlighting or autocompletion.

dotnet script allows you to run C# scripts from the command line. It has a REPL built-in, but the predominant focus seems to be as a script runner. It's a great tool, though, and has a strong community following.

dotnet interactive is a tool from Microsoft that creates a Jupyter notebook for C#, runnable through Visual Studio Code. It also provides a general framework useful for running REPLs.

Download Details:
Author: waf
Source Code: https://github.com/waf/CSharpRepl
License: MPL-2.0 License

#dotnet  #aspdotnet  #csharp 

Siphiwe  Nair

Siphiwe Nair

1620466520

Your Data Architecture: Simple Best Practices for Your Data Strategy

If you accumulate data on which you base your decision-making as an organization, you should probably think about your data architecture and possible best practices.

If you accumulate data on which you base your decision-making as an organization, you most probably need to think about your data architecture and consider possible best practices. Gaining a competitive edge, remaining customer-centric to the greatest extent possible, and streamlining processes to get on-the-button outcomes can all be traced back to an organization’s capacity to build a future-ready data architecture.

In what follows, we offer a short overview of the overarching capabilities of data architecture. These include user-centricity, elasticity, robustness, and the capacity to ensure the seamless flow of data at all times. Added to these are automation enablement, plus security and data governance considerations. These points from our checklist for what we perceive to be an anticipatory analytics ecosystem.

#big data #data science #big data analytics #data analysis #data architecture #data transformation #data platform #data strategy #cloud data platform #data acquisition

How to Visualize High Frequency Financial Data Using Plotly and R

In this article I show how to use the Plotly package to visualize financial data in high frequency using R. To perform analysis and develop trading algorithms, it is necessary to obtain data in very high frequencies to be able to take quick and accurate actions to maximize the profits earned in the trades.
Today, more than 40% of the operations carried out on American stock exchanges are carried out by robots programmed to analyze the market and buy or sell according to market indicators. Today we are going to learn how to create a candlestick chart from a Brazilian asset data called “mini-index,” widely used by daytraders.

#stock-market #data-visualization #data-analysis #towards-data-science #data-science

Sid  Schuppe

Sid Schuppe

1617988080

How To Blend Data in Google Data Studio For Better Data Analysis

Using data to inform decisions is essential to product management, or anything really. And thankfully, we aren’t short of it. Any online application generates an abundance of data and it’s up to us to collect it and then make sense of it.

Google Data Studio helps us understand the meaning behind data, enabling us to build beautiful visualizations and dashboards that transform data into stories. If it wasn’t already, data literacy is as much a fundamental skill as learning to read or write. Or it certainly will be.

Nothing is more powerful than data democracy, where anyone in your organization can regularly make decisions informed with data. As part of enabling this, we need to be able to visualize data in a way that brings it to life and makes it more accessible. I’ve recently been learning how to do this and wanted to share some of the cool ways you can do this in Google Data Studio.

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