August  Larson

August Larson

1629928920

Python Tutorial: Compare Two Lists Using For Loop and Example Code

Learn Python Tutorial: Compare Two Lists Using For Loop and Example Code

You can compare two lists the same as other programming languages using for loop in python. You have to use 2 for loop to compare every element with another list without sorting.

#Python 

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Python Tutorial: Compare Two Lists Using For Loop and Example Code
Ray  Patel

Ray Patel

1619518440

top 30 Python Tips and Tricks for Beginners

Welcome to my Blog , In this article, you are going to learn the top 10 python tips and tricks.

1) swap two numbers.

2) Reversing a string in Python.

3) Create a single string from all the elements in list.

4) Chaining Of Comparison Operators.

5) Print The File Path Of Imported Modules.

6) Return Multiple Values From Functions.

7) Find The Most Frequent Value In A List.

8) Check The Memory Usage Of An Object.

#python #python hacks tricks #python learning tips #python programming tricks #python tips #python tips and tricks #python tips and tricks advanced #python tips and tricks for beginners #python tips tricks and techniques #python tutorial #tips and tricks in python #tips to learn python #top 30 python tips and tricks for beginners

Ray  Patel

Ray Patel

1619510796

Lambda, Map, Filter functions in python

Welcome to my Blog, In this article, we will learn python lambda function, Map function, and filter function.

Lambda function in python: Lambda is a one line anonymous function and lambda takes any number of arguments but can only have one expression and python lambda syntax is

Syntax: x = lambda arguments : expression

Now i will show you some python lambda function examples:

#python #anonymous function python #filter function in python #lambda #lambda python 3 #map python #python filter #python filter lambda #python lambda #python lambda examples #python map

Ida  Nader

Ida Nader

1599099600

How to Use If-Else Statements and Loops in R – Dataquest

When we’re programming in R (or any other language, for that matter), we often want to control when and how particular parts of our code are executed. We can do that using control structures like if-else statements, for loops, and while loops.

Control structures are blocks of code that determine how other sections of code are executed based on specified parameters. You can think of these as a bit like the instructions a parent might give a child before leaving the house:

“If I’m not home by 8pm, make yourself dinner.”

Control structures set a condition and tell R what to do when that condition is met or not met. And unlike some kids, R will always do what we tell it to! You can learn more about control structures in the R documentation if you would like.

In this tutorial, we assume you’re familiar with basic data structures, and arithmetic operations in R.

Not quite there yet? Check out our Introductory R Programming course that’s part of our Data Analyst in R path. It’s free to start learning, there are no prerequisites, and there’s nothing to install — you can start learning in your browser right now.

install.packages(“Dataquest”)

Start learning R today with our Introduction to R course — no credit card required!

SIGN UP

(This tutorial is based on our intermediate R programming course, so check that out as well! It’s interactive and will allow you to write and run code right in your browser.)

Comparison Operators in R

In order to use control structures, we need to create statements that will turn out to be either TRUE or FALSE. In the kids example above, the statement “It’s 8pm. Are my parents home yet?” yields TRUE (“Yes”) or FALSE (“No”). In R, the most fundamental way to evaluate something as TRUE or FALSE is through comparison operators.

Below are six essential comparison operators for working with control structures in R:

  • == means equality. The statement x == a framed as a question means “Does the value of x equal the value of a?”
  • != means “not equal”. The statement x == b means “Does the value of x not equal the value of b?”
  • < means “less than”. The statement x < c means “Is the value of x less than the value of c?”
  • <= means “less than or equal”. The statement x <= d means “Is the value of x less or equal to the value of d?”
  • > means “greater than”. The statement x > e means “Is the value of x greater than the value of e?”
  • >= means “greater than or equal”. The statement x >= f means “Is the value of xgreater than or equal to the value of f?”

#data science tutorials #beginner #for loop #for loops #if #if else #learn r #r #r tutorial #rstats #tutorial #tutorials #while loop #while loops

Ray  Patel

Ray Patel

1623077340

50+ Basic Python Code Examples

List, strings, score calculation and more…

1. How to print “Hello World” on Python?

2. How to print “Hello + Username” with the user’s name on Python?

3. How to add 2 numbers entered on Python?

4. How to find the Average of 2 Entered Numbers on Python?

5. How to calculate the Entered Visa and Final Grade Average on Python?

6. How to find the Average of 3 Written Grades entered on Python?

7. How to show the Class Pass Status (PASSED — FAILED) of the Student whose Written Average Has Been Entered on Python?

8. How to find out if the entered number is odd or even on Python?

9. How to find out if the entered number is Positive, Negative, or 0 on Python?

#programming #python #coding #50+ basic python code examples #python programming examples #python code

How To Compare Tesla and Ford Company By Using Magic Methods in Python

Magic Methods are the special methods which gives us the ability to access built in syntactical features such as ‘<’, ‘>’, ‘==’, ‘+’ etc…

You must have worked with such methods without knowing them to be as magic methods. Magic methods can be identified with their names which start with __ and ends with __ like init, call, str etc. These methods are also called Dunder Methods, because of their name starting and ending with Double Underscore (Dunder).

Now there are a number of such special methods, which you might have come across too, in Python. We will just be taking an example of a few of them to understand how they work and how we can use them.

1. init

class AnyClass:
    def __init__():
        print("Init called on its own")
obj = AnyClass()

The first example is _init, _and as the name suggests, it is used for initializing objects. Init method is called on its own, ie. whenever an object is created for the class, the init method is called on its own.

The output of the above code will be given below. Note how we did not call the init method and it got invoked as we created an object for class AnyClass.

Init called on its own

2. add

Let’s move to some other example, add gives us the ability to access the built in syntax feature of the character +. Let’s see how,

class AnyClass:
    def __init__(self, var):
        self.some_var = var
    def __add__(self, other_obj):
        print("Calling the add method")
        return self.some_var + other_obj.some_var
obj1 = AnyClass(5)
obj2 = AnyClass(6)
obj1 + obj2

#python3 #python #python-programming #python-web-development #python-tutorials #python-top-story #python-tips #learn-python