Rachel Cole

Rachel Cole

1574863158

GraphQL and Django Tutorial: Should you be using Django with GraphQL?

For the past 5 years, Django has been the most effective framework for making quick web applications, API Endpoints, or Admin panels for other applications.

One of the biggest advantages of Django is its ability to enable users to write less code and get started quicker, especially if you’re including an admin panel and a fully-manageable database migration process as base functionality.

Django Rest Framework—an external toolkit—makes it easy to build API endpoints. It basically wraps full CRUD API around the Django Model with just a few lines of code.

This means that building any basic CRUD API with Django helps to keep more of a development focus on UI parts, which are key elements of all software products.

Similarly, GraphQL aims to automate backend APIs by providing type strict query language and a single API Endpoint where you can query all information that you need from UI and trigger actions (mutations) to send data to the backend.

My journey with GraphQL started with Facebook’s API, where GraphQL comes from.

Naturally, GraphQL is considered to be very close to the JavaScript world, mostly because browser-based apps are the first adopters of that technology.

That’s why my first GraphQL server+client was done in Node.js and React.js. After having the first app built on top of GraphQL API, I started to use it exclusively for my Web-based projects.

Advantages of GraphQL

As you may have guessed, there is a library for Django to support GraphQL called Graphene Django, which is very similar to the Django Rest Framework.

However, there are significant differences between Django Rest and Django with GraphQL.

The key difference lies in UI usability: with Rest API, you’re getting endless URLs with specific parameter names where you have to check types and specific values.

Meanwhile, with GraphQL you’re defining mutation similar to the code below and getting strictly defined variable names and types, which become part of an automatic GraphQL type validation.

type Mutation {
  userLogin(email: String!, password: String!): UserLoginResponse
}

type UserLoginResponse {
  token: String
  error: Boolean
  message: String
}

GraphQL also comes with another bonus packaged inside its type system. It automatically generates documentation where you can get available queries and mutations with their parameters/return types.

Django Rest also generates some form of documentation, but it is not as usable as the GraphQL Playground displayed below.

prettify-nocdn.png
If you think this type of interface is available for all kinds of GraphQL endpoints, you’re wrong — this is only available in development mode servers.

In terms of security, having one API Endpoint is naturally more manageable than having hundreds of them—especially when you consider the fact that GraphQL automatically keeps specific type rules and won’t allow requests with incorrect parameter names or values.

Django ❤️ GraphQL

Let’s make a basic setup with Django and GraphQL just to demonstrate how powerful this setup can be. On one hand, you’re getting easy CRUD management with database. On the other hand, you’re getting a very powerful API query language with a single endpoint.

Installation should be very easy. Just follow the steps defined here

The interesting parts are defining GraphQL types and queries in Python. It’s actually based on your database models, but you can also define custom queries without using Django Models.

# schema.py
from graphene_django import DjangoObjectType
import graphene
from .models import Post as PostModel
from .models import User as UserModel

class Post(DjangoObjectType):
    class Meta:
        model = PostModel
        interfaces = (relay.Node,)

    @classmethod
    def get_node(cls, info, id):
        return Post.objects.get(id=id)

class User(DjangoObjectType):
    class Meta:
        model = UserModel
        interfaces = (relay.Node,)

        posts = graphene.List(Post)

    def resolve_users(self, info):
                return Post.objects.filter(user=self)

    @classmethod
    def get_node(cls, info, id):
        return User.objects.get(id=id)

class Query(graphene.ObjectType):
    users = graphene.List(User)

    def resolve_users(self, info):
        return UserModel.objects.all()

schema = graphene.Schema(query=Query)

Now you can very easily query all users with their posts.

The most important thing to remember is that you can query fields you want, which will affect the overall load time and traffic usage on the UI side.

For larger user bases, it’s important to keep traffic low and only query the fields you need. In the case of Rest API, you will get all fields anyway.

query {
  users {
    name
    posts {
      id
    title
    content
    }
  }
}

This is the basic query outcome from the Python definition, which is pretty simple and — compared to Rest API — more expressive than you may think.

What about GraphQL Subscriptions?

GraphQL Subscriptions function as a way to tell the server to retrieve data based on a specific query whenever the data is available.

It all works with WebSockets in near-real time, which means we have to somehow include Django Websockets and configure our backend server for accepting WebSockets.

Basically, GraphQL is just an API query language interpretation that works with any kind of network transportation when handling client and server-side GraphQL language interpretation.

It may seem difficult at first, but there’s an open-source library and Django GraphQL Subscriptions over at the Django Websockets module.

# settings.py

GRAPHENE = {
    'SCHEMA_INDENT': 4,
    'MIDDLEWARE': [
        # Others middlewares
        'graphene_django_subscriptions.depromise_subscription',
    ]
}

This will be enough to handle the subscription schema later on as a Subscription query.
A quick aside: Pinterist actually works entirely on GraphQL Subscriptions, which is all built on top of Django Backend (but probably modified a lot.)

Conclusion

In my opinion, Django with GraphQL is more powerful and extensible than Django with Rest API.

However, it isn’t battle-tested and large companies are still in the process of adopting this kind of combination, but based on what you can get out of this simple configuration, imagine how much more comfortable web development will be when you use Django with GraphQL with modern technologies.

#GraphQL #Django #Python #WebDev #Databases

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GraphQL and Django Tutorial: Should you be using Django with GraphQL?
Ahebwe  Oscar

Ahebwe Oscar

1620177818

Django admin full Customization step by step

Welcome to my blog , hey everyone in this article you learn how to customize the Django app and view in the article you will know how to register  and unregister  models from the admin view how to add filtering how to add a custom input field, and a button that triggers an action on all objects and even how to change the look of your app and page using the Django suit package let’s get started.

Database

Custom Titles of Django Admin

Exclude in Django Admin

Fields in Django Admin

#django #create super user django #customize django admin dashboard #django admin #django admin custom field display #django admin customization #django admin full customization #django admin interface #django admin register all models #django customization

Sival Alethea

Sival Alethea

1624418760

Weather App - Django Tutorial (Using Python Requests). DO NOT MISS!!!

See how to create a weather app in Django that gets the current weathers for multiple cities. This tutorial uses Python Requests to call the Open Weather Map API.

📺 The video in this post was made by freeCodeCamp.org
The origin of the article: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qCQGV7F7CUc&list=PLWKjhJtqVAbnqBxcdjVGgT3uVR10bzTEB&index=15
🔥 If you’re a beginner. I believe the article below will be useful to you ☞ What You Should Know Before Investing in Cryptocurrency - For Beginner
⭐ ⭐ ⭐The project is of interest to the community. Join to Get free ‘GEEK coin’ (GEEKCASH coin)!
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Thanks for visiting and watching! Please don’t forget to leave a like, comment and share!

#weather app #django #python #weather app - django tutorial (using python requests) #using python requests #django tutorial

Ahebwe  Oscar

Ahebwe Oscar

1620185280

How model queries work in Django

How model queries work in Django

Welcome to my blog, hey everyone in this article we are going to be working with queries in Django so for any web app that you build your going to want to write a query so you can retrieve information from your database so in this article I’ll be showing you all the different ways that you can write queries and it should cover about 90% of the cases that you’ll have when you’re writing your code the other 10% depend on your specific use case you may have to get more complicated but for the most part what I cover in this article should be able to help you so let’s start with the model that I have I’ve already created it.

**Read More : **How to make Chatbot in Python.

Read More : Django Admin Full Customization step by step

let’s just get into this diagram that I made so in here:

django queries aboutDescribe each parameter in Django querset

we’re making a simple query for the myModel table so we want to pull out all the information in the database so we have this variable which is gonna hold a return value and we have our myModel models so this is simply the myModel model name so whatever you named your model just make sure you specify that and we’re gonna access the objects attribute once we get that object’s attribute we can simply use the all method and this will return all the information in the database so we’re gonna start with all and then we will go into getting single items filtering that data and go to our command prompt.

Here and we’ll actually start making our queries from here to do this let’s just go ahead and run** Python manage.py shell** and I am in my project file so make sure you’re in there when you start and what this does is it gives us an interactive shell to actually start working with our data so this is a lot like the Python shell but because we did manage.py it allows us to do things a Django way and actually query our database now open up the command prompt and let’s go ahead and start making our first queries.

#django #django model queries #django orm #django queries #django query #model django query #model query #query with django

Delbert  Ferry

Delbert Ferry

1622105190

How to use GraphQL with Javascript – GraphQL.js tutorial

One of the fastest ways to get up and running with GraphQL is to install Apollo Server as middleware on your new or existing HTTP server.

In this short post, we demonstrate how to use Apollo Server to create a GraphQL server with Express.js using the [apollo-server-express] package. At the end, we’ll discuss the tradeoffs of this approach.

#graphql #javascript #graphql.js #graphql.js tutorial

Rachel Cole

Rachel Cole

1574863158

GraphQL and Django Tutorial: Should you be using Django with GraphQL?

For the past 5 years, Django has been the most effective framework for making quick web applications, API Endpoints, or Admin panels for other applications.

One of the biggest advantages of Django is its ability to enable users to write less code and get started quicker, especially if you’re including an admin panel and a fully-manageable database migration process as base functionality.

Django Rest Framework—an external toolkit—makes it easy to build API endpoints. It basically wraps full CRUD API around the Django Model with just a few lines of code.

This means that building any basic CRUD API with Django helps to keep more of a development focus on UI parts, which are key elements of all software products.

Similarly, GraphQL aims to automate backend APIs by providing type strict query language and a single API Endpoint where you can query all information that you need from UI and trigger actions (mutations) to send data to the backend.

My journey with GraphQL started with Facebook’s API, where GraphQL comes from.

Naturally, GraphQL is considered to be very close to the JavaScript world, mostly because browser-based apps are the first adopters of that technology.

That’s why my first GraphQL server+client was done in Node.js and React.js. After having the first app built on top of GraphQL API, I started to use it exclusively for my Web-based projects.

Advantages of GraphQL

As you may have guessed, there is a library for Django to support GraphQL called Graphene Django, which is very similar to the Django Rest Framework.

However, there are significant differences between Django Rest and Django with GraphQL.

The key difference lies in UI usability: with Rest API, you’re getting endless URLs with specific parameter names where you have to check types and specific values.

Meanwhile, with GraphQL you’re defining mutation similar to the code below and getting strictly defined variable names and types, which become part of an automatic GraphQL type validation.

type Mutation {
  userLogin(email: String!, password: String!): UserLoginResponse
}

type UserLoginResponse {
  token: String
  error: Boolean
  message: String
}

GraphQL also comes with another bonus packaged inside its type system. It automatically generates documentation where you can get available queries and mutations with their parameters/return types.

Django Rest also generates some form of documentation, but it is not as usable as the GraphQL Playground displayed below.

prettify-nocdn.png
If you think this type of interface is available for all kinds of GraphQL endpoints, you’re wrong — this is only available in development mode servers.

In terms of security, having one API Endpoint is naturally more manageable than having hundreds of them—especially when you consider the fact that GraphQL automatically keeps specific type rules and won’t allow requests with incorrect parameter names or values.

Django ❤️ GraphQL

Let’s make a basic setup with Django and GraphQL just to demonstrate how powerful this setup can be. On one hand, you’re getting easy CRUD management with database. On the other hand, you’re getting a very powerful API query language with a single endpoint.

Installation should be very easy. Just follow the steps defined here

The interesting parts are defining GraphQL types and queries in Python. It’s actually based on your database models, but you can also define custom queries without using Django Models.

# schema.py
from graphene_django import DjangoObjectType
import graphene
from .models import Post as PostModel
from .models import User as UserModel

class Post(DjangoObjectType):
    class Meta:
        model = PostModel
        interfaces = (relay.Node,)

    @classmethod
    def get_node(cls, info, id):
        return Post.objects.get(id=id)

class User(DjangoObjectType):
    class Meta:
        model = UserModel
        interfaces = (relay.Node,)

        posts = graphene.List(Post)

    def resolve_users(self, info):
                return Post.objects.filter(user=self)

    @classmethod
    def get_node(cls, info, id):
        return User.objects.get(id=id)

class Query(graphene.ObjectType):
    users = graphene.List(User)

    def resolve_users(self, info):
        return UserModel.objects.all()

schema = graphene.Schema(query=Query)

Now you can very easily query all users with their posts.

The most important thing to remember is that you can query fields you want, which will affect the overall load time and traffic usage on the UI side.

For larger user bases, it’s important to keep traffic low and only query the fields you need. In the case of Rest API, you will get all fields anyway.

query {
  users {
    name
    posts {
      id
    title
    content
    }
  }
}

This is the basic query outcome from the Python definition, which is pretty simple and — compared to Rest API — more expressive than you may think.

What about GraphQL Subscriptions?

GraphQL Subscriptions function as a way to tell the server to retrieve data based on a specific query whenever the data is available.

It all works with WebSockets in near-real time, which means we have to somehow include Django Websockets and configure our backend server for accepting WebSockets.

Basically, GraphQL is just an API query language interpretation that works with any kind of network transportation when handling client and server-side GraphQL language interpretation.

It may seem difficult at first, but there’s an open-source library and Django GraphQL Subscriptions over at the Django Websockets module.

# settings.py

GRAPHENE = {
    'SCHEMA_INDENT': 4,
    'MIDDLEWARE': [
        # Others middlewares
        'graphene_django_subscriptions.depromise_subscription',
    ]
}

This will be enough to handle the subscription schema later on as a Subscription query.
A quick aside: Pinterist actually works entirely on GraphQL Subscriptions, which is all built on top of Django Backend (but probably modified a lot.)

Conclusion

In my opinion, Django with GraphQL is more powerful and extensible than Django with Rest API.

However, it isn’t battle-tested and large companies are still in the process of adopting this kind of combination, but based on what you can get out of this simple configuration, imagine how much more comfortable web development will be when you use Django with GraphQL with modern technologies.

#GraphQL #Django #Python #WebDev #Databases