Saad  Kassam

Saad Kassam

1617447180

CircuitPython with Raspberry Pi Pico - Getting Started

Build a Keyboard and Mouse Emulator, make a rainbow with RGB LEDs, and work with a microSD card - all with CircuitPython on a Raspberry Pi Pico!

Once again we are working with the Raspberry Pi Pico, the 4-dollar microcontroller that uses the new RP2040 MCU. And today we’ll be programming it using CircuitPython.

After installing CircuitPython and the MU Editor we will build a Keyboard Emulator for the popular audio program Audacity. You can use the same technique to make a custom keypad for any application, with as many keys as you need.

Next, we emulate a mouse using a Joystick and two pushbuttons. Just because we can.

Then we hook up a microSD card module through the SPI port and learn how to create a file, write to it and read it back. All the basic operations you need to start using microSD cards in your Pico projects.

And finally, we will hook up soon addressed;e REGB LEDs, otherwise known as Neopixels, to our Pico and control them using a few Adaruit libraries and sample code. It’s a rainbow inside the workshop!

CircuitPython is a fork of MicroPython, the language we used in the previous Raspberry Pi Pico video. It was created by Adafruit and has a lot of advantages, especially for beginners.

Using CircuitPython gives us access to over 300 libraries and drivers, allowing us to work with the many features of the Raspberry Pi Pico right now.

We’ll install CircuitPython on a Pico and then work with it using the MU Editor, a Python editor designed for beginners with CircuitPython integration built-in. Of course, you can use any editor that you wish, that’s one of the strengths of CircuitPython - no special software required.

Here is what we will cover today:

00:00​ - Introduction
04:13​ - CircuitPython
06:47​ - Installing CircuitPython on Pico
09:40​ - Installing MU Editor
12:44​ - Testing (Blink)
14:43​ - Build a Keyboard Emulator
22:49​ - Build a Mouse Emulator
28:28​ - Write & Read a microSD card
34:32​ - Addressable RGB Strip (Neopixels)
39:24​ - Conclusion

Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/c/Dronebotworkshop1/featured

#raspberry #circuitpython

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

CircuitPython with Raspberry Pi Pico - Getting Started

Tools and Images to Build a Raspberry Pi n8n server

n8n-pi

Tools and Images to Build a Raspberry Pi n8n server

Introduction

The purpose of this project is to create a Raspberry Pi image preconfigured with n8n so that it runs out of the box.

What is n8n?

n8n is a no-code/low code environment used to connect and automate different systems and services. It is programmed using a series of connected nodes that receive, transform, and then transmit date from and to other nodes. Each node represents a service or system allowing these different entities to interact. All of this is done using a WebUI.

Why n8n-pi?

Whevever a new technology is released, two common barriers often prevent potential users from trying out the technology:

  1. System costs
  2. Installation & configuration challenges

The n8n-pi project eliminates these two roadblocks by preconfiguring a working system that runs on easily available, low cost hardware. For as little as $40 and a few minutes, they can have a full n8n system up and running.

Thanks!

This project would not be possible if it was not for the help of the following:

Documentation

All documentation for this project can be found at http://n8n-pi.tephlon.xyz.

Download Details:

Author: TephlonDude

GitHub: https://github.com/TephlonDude/n8n-pi

#pi #raspberry pi #raspberry #raspberry-pi

TensorFlow Lite Object Detection using Raspberry Pi and Pi Camera

I have not created the Object Detection model, I have just merely cloned Google’s Tensor Flow Lite model and followed their Raspberry Pi Tutorial which they talked about in the Readme! You don’t need to use this article if you understand everything from the Readme. I merely talk about what I did!

Prerequisites:

  • I have used a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B and PI Camera Board (3D printed a case for camera board). **I had this connected before starting and did not include this in the 90 minutes **(plenty of YouTube videos showing how to do this depending on what Pi model you have. I used a video like this a while ago!)

  • I have used my Apple Macbook which is Linux at heart and so is the Raspberry Pi. By using Apple you don’t need to install any applications to interact with the Raspberry Pi, but on Windows you do (I will explain where to go in the article if you use windows)

#raspberry-pi #object-detection #raspberry-pi-camera #tensorflow-lite #tensorflow #tensorflow lite object detection using raspberry pi and pi camera

Saad  Kassam

Saad Kassam

1617447180

CircuitPython with Raspberry Pi Pico - Getting Started

Build a Keyboard and Mouse Emulator, make a rainbow with RGB LEDs, and work with a microSD card - all with CircuitPython on a Raspberry Pi Pico!

Once again we are working with the Raspberry Pi Pico, the 4-dollar microcontroller that uses the new RP2040 MCU. And today we’ll be programming it using CircuitPython.

After installing CircuitPython and the MU Editor we will build a Keyboard Emulator for the popular audio program Audacity. You can use the same technique to make a custom keypad for any application, with as many keys as you need.

Next, we emulate a mouse using a Joystick and two pushbuttons. Just because we can.

Then we hook up a microSD card module through the SPI port and learn how to create a file, write to it and read it back. All the basic operations you need to start using microSD cards in your Pico projects.

And finally, we will hook up soon addressed;e REGB LEDs, otherwise known as Neopixels, to our Pico and control them using a few Adaruit libraries and sample code. It’s a rainbow inside the workshop!

CircuitPython is a fork of MicroPython, the language we used in the previous Raspberry Pi Pico video. It was created by Adafruit and has a lot of advantages, especially for beginners.

Using CircuitPython gives us access to over 300 libraries and drivers, allowing us to work with the many features of the Raspberry Pi Pico right now.

We’ll install CircuitPython on a Pico and then work with it using the MU Editor, a Python editor designed for beginners with CircuitPython integration built-in. Of course, you can use any editor that you wish, that’s one of the strengths of CircuitPython - no special software required.

Here is what we will cover today:

00:00​ - Introduction
04:13​ - CircuitPython
06:47​ - Installing CircuitPython on Pico
09:40​ - Installing MU Editor
12:44​ - Testing (Blink)
14:43​ - Build a Keyboard Emulator
22:49​ - Build a Mouse Emulator
28:28​ - Write & Read a microSD card
34:32​ - Addressable RGB Strip (Neopixels)
39:24​ - Conclusion

Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/c/Dronebotworkshop1/featured

#raspberry #circuitpython

The Raspberry Pi 400 - A full computer in a keyboard!

The Raspberry Pi 400 has arrived in the studio, and in this video I’ll give it a review. I’ll show an unboxing of the Personal Computer Kit from Canakit, which is a great way to get started on the Pi 400. Then I’ll show off the hardware, as well as the out-of-box experience.

#raspberry pi #pi #raspberry-pi

Layne  Fadel

Layne Fadel

1625375100

Raspberry Pico: The Complete SDK Overview (Native C/C++,Arduino,MicroPython,CircuitPython)

The Raspberry Pico, or shorthand Pico, is a new microcontroller from the Raspberry Pi foundation. When released early 2021, two frameworks were offered: native C/C++ SDK, and a MicroPython port. About half a year later, two additions became stable: The Arduino framework, a wrapper of the C-SDK in which you work with Arduino commands, and CircuitPython, another embedded version of Python. This article is a comprehensive summary of all available frameworks. You will learn about installation, features, supporting editors and see a blinking LED example for each framework.

_This article originally appeared at _my blog.

C/C+±SDK

The native C/C++ SDK is the original release developed and maintained by the Raspberry Pi foundation.

Installation and usage is covered in the official documentation (PDF). Proper setup can be difficult: You can apply the steps mentioned in the guide, or when you use a Linux OS, use the official one-liner that completely setups the complex toolchain.

There is no standard editor, but the official documentation explain how to customize Visual Studio Code with extensions that support CMake and debugging. For a concrete project setup, I shamelessly self-promote my own getting started kit: pico-project-bootstrap.

Your IDE might look as follows.

The latest release v1.20 has exiting features: Better support for Free RTOS, the real-time Linux system, several update for working with DMA, clocks and mutexes, and even new hardware boards, like the new Pimoroni Pico LiPo, is supported.

The classical blinking LED example looks as follows:

/*
* ---------------------------------------
* Copyright (c) Sebastian Günther 2021  |
*                                       |
* devcon@admantium.com                  |
*                                       |
* SPDX-License-Identifier: BSD-3-Clause |
* ---------------------------------------
*/
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdbool.h>
#include "pico/stdlib.h"
int LED_BUILTIN = 25;
void blink() {
  gpio_put(LED_BUILTIN, 1);
  sleep_ms(750);
  gpio_put(LED_BUILTIN, 0);
  sleep_ms(1050);
}
int main() {
  stdio_init_all();
  gpio_init(LED_BUILTIN);
  gpio_set_dir(LED_BUILTIN, GPIO_OUT);
  puts("Hello World\n");
  while (true) {
    puts(".");
    blink();
  }
}

Arduino Framework

Arduino, a name that identifies a family of microcontrollers as well as an IDE, is widely used and known in IOT and robotics project. Arduino boards are typically programmed with C, where the default framework has abstractions for pins, serial input/output, servos etc. Since the release v1.20, you can program your Rasperry Pico with the Arduino framework. This means that the C-SDK functions are wrapped, you use the typical Arduino commands instead.

There are two options to get this working. First, if you are coming from the Arduino world, you can add the Rasperry Pico as a board to your Arduino IDE. Add the Pico Arduino repository to your board manager according to the installation manual. Then, select the appropriate board and you are ready to program.

#c #python #raspberry-pico #raspberry-pi