Brad  Braun

Brad Braun

1615365540

Let’s Create A Website with Next.js, antd and Deploy With Now.sh

This article we will create an example web with Next.js, Express, and use Ant Design for CSS components. We will deploy the project with Now.sh.

Result URL: https://nextjs-antd-custom.autsakorn.now.sh

#nextjs #reactjs

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Let’s Create A Website with Next.js, antd and Deploy With Now.sh
Easter  Deckow

Easter Deckow

1655630160

PyTumblr: A Python Tumblr API v2 Client

PyTumblr

Installation

Install via pip:

$ pip install pytumblr

Install from source:

$ git clone https://github.com/tumblr/pytumblr.git
$ cd pytumblr
$ python setup.py install

Usage

Create a client

A pytumblr.TumblrRestClient is the object you'll make all of your calls to the Tumblr API through. Creating one is this easy:

client = pytumblr.TumblrRestClient(
    '<consumer_key>',
    '<consumer_secret>',
    '<oauth_token>',
    '<oauth_secret>',
)

client.info() # Grabs the current user information

Two easy ways to get your credentials to are:

  1. The built-in interactive_console.py tool (if you already have a consumer key & secret)
  2. The Tumblr API console at https://api.tumblr.com/console
  3. Get sample login code at https://api.tumblr.com/console/calls/user/info

Supported Methods

User Methods

client.info() # get information about the authenticating user
client.dashboard() # get the dashboard for the authenticating user
client.likes() # get the likes for the authenticating user
client.following() # get the blogs followed by the authenticating user

client.follow('codingjester.tumblr.com') # follow a blog
client.unfollow('codingjester.tumblr.com') # unfollow a blog

client.like(id, reblogkey) # like a post
client.unlike(id, reblogkey) # unlike a post

Blog Methods

client.blog_info(blogName) # get information about a blog
client.posts(blogName, **params) # get posts for a blog
client.avatar(blogName) # get the avatar for a blog
client.blog_likes(blogName) # get the likes on a blog
client.followers(blogName) # get the followers of a blog
client.blog_following(blogName) # get the publicly exposed blogs that [blogName] follows
client.queue(blogName) # get the queue for a given blog
client.submission(blogName) # get the submissions for a given blog

Post Methods

Creating posts

PyTumblr lets you create all of the various types that Tumblr supports. When using these types there are a few defaults that are able to be used with any post type.

The default supported types are described below.

  • state - a string, the state of the post. Supported types are published, draft, queue, private
  • tags - a list, a list of strings that you want tagged on the post. eg: ["testing", "magic", "1"]
  • tweet - a string, the string of the customized tweet you want. eg: "Man I love my mega awesome post!"
  • date - a string, the customized GMT that you want
  • format - a string, the format that your post is in. Support types are html or markdown
  • slug - a string, the slug for the url of the post you want

We'll show examples throughout of these default examples while showcasing all the specific post types.

Creating a photo post

Creating a photo post supports a bunch of different options plus the described default options * caption - a string, the user supplied caption * link - a string, the "click-through" url for the photo * source - a string, the url for the photo you want to use (use this or the data parameter) * data - a list or string, a list of filepaths or a single file path for multipart file upload

#Creates a photo post using a source URL
client.create_photo(blogName, state="published", tags=["testing", "ok"],
                    source="https://68.media.tumblr.com/b965fbb2e501610a29d80ffb6fb3e1ad/tumblr_n55vdeTse11rn1906o1_500.jpg")

#Creates a photo post using a local filepath
client.create_photo(blogName, state="queue", tags=["testing", "ok"],
                    tweet="Woah this is an incredible sweet post [URL]",
                    data="/Users/johnb/path/to/my/image.jpg")

#Creates a photoset post using several local filepaths
client.create_photo(blogName, state="draft", tags=["jb is cool"], format="markdown",
                    data=["/Users/johnb/path/to/my/image.jpg", "/Users/johnb/Pictures/kittens.jpg"],
                    caption="## Mega sweet kittens")

Creating a text post

Creating a text post supports the same options as default and just a two other parameters * title - a string, the optional title for the post. Supports markdown or html * body - a string, the body of the of the post. Supports markdown or html

#Creating a text post
client.create_text(blogName, state="published", slug="testing-text-posts", title="Testing", body="testing1 2 3 4")

Creating a quote post

Creating a quote post supports the same options as default and two other parameter * quote - a string, the full text of the qote. Supports markdown or html * source - a string, the cited source. HTML supported

#Creating a quote post
client.create_quote(blogName, state="queue", quote="I am the Walrus", source="Ringo")

Creating a link post

  • title - a string, the title of post that you want. Supports HTML entities.
  • url - a string, the url that you want to create a link post for.
  • description - a string, the desciption of the link that you have
#Create a link post
client.create_link(blogName, title="I like to search things, you should too.", url="https://duckduckgo.com",
                   description="Search is pretty cool when a duck does it.")

Creating a chat post

Creating a chat post supports the same options as default and two other parameters * title - a string, the title of the chat post * conversation - a string, the text of the conversation/chat, with diablog labels (no html)

#Create a chat post
chat = """John: Testing can be fun!
Renee: Testing is tedious and so are you.
John: Aw.
"""
client.create_chat(blogName, title="Renee just doesn't understand.", conversation=chat, tags=["renee", "testing"])

Creating an audio post

Creating an audio post allows for all default options and a has 3 other parameters. The only thing to keep in mind while dealing with audio posts is to make sure that you use the external_url parameter or data. You cannot use both at the same time. * caption - a string, the caption for your post * external_url - a string, the url of the site that hosts the audio file * data - a string, the filepath of the audio file you want to upload to Tumblr

#Creating an audio file
client.create_audio(blogName, caption="Rock out.", data="/Users/johnb/Music/my/new/sweet/album.mp3")

#lets use soundcloud!
client.create_audio(blogName, caption="Mega rock out.", external_url="https://soundcloud.com/skrillex/sets/recess")

Creating a video post

Creating a video post allows for all default options and has three other options. Like the other post types, it has some restrictions. You cannot use the embed and data parameters at the same time. * caption - a string, the caption for your post * embed - a string, the HTML embed code for the video * data - a string, the path of the file you want to upload

#Creating an upload from YouTube
client.create_video(blogName, caption="Jon Snow. Mega ridiculous sword.",
                    embed="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=40pUYLacrj4")

#Creating a video post from local file
client.create_video(blogName, caption="testing", data="/Users/johnb/testing/ok/blah.mov")

Editing a post

Updating a post requires you knowing what type a post you're updating. You'll be able to supply to the post any of the options given above for updates.

client.edit_post(blogName, id=post_id, type="text", title="Updated")
client.edit_post(blogName, id=post_id, type="photo", data="/Users/johnb/mega/awesome.jpg")

Reblogging a Post

Reblogging a post just requires knowing the post id and the reblog key, which is supplied in the JSON of any post object.

client.reblog(blogName, id=125356, reblog_key="reblog_key")

Deleting a post

Deleting just requires that you own the post and have the post id

client.delete_post(blogName, 123456) # Deletes your post :(

A note on tags: When passing tags, as params, please pass them as a list (not a comma-separated string):

client.create_text(blogName, tags=['hello', 'world'], ...)

Getting notes for a post

In order to get the notes for a post, you need to have the post id and the blog that it is on.

data = client.notes(blogName, id='123456')

The results include a timestamp you can use to make future calls.

data = client.notes(blogName, id='123456', before_timestamp=data["_links"]["next"]["query_params"]["before_timestamp"])

Tagged Methods

# get posts with a given tag
client.tagged(tag, **params)

Using the interactive console

This client comes with a nice interactive console to run you through the OAuth process, grab your tokens (and store them for future use).

You'll need pyyaml installed to run it, but then it's just:

$ python interactive-console.py

and away you go! Tokens are stored in ~/.tumblr and are also shared by other Tumblr API clients like the Ruby client.

Running tests

The tests (and coverage reports) are run with nose, like this:

python setup.py test

Author: tumblr
Source Code: https://github.com/tumblr/pytumblr
License: Apache-2.0 license

#python #api 

NBB: Ad-hoc CLJS Scripting on Node.js

Nbb

Not babashka. Node.js babashka!?

Ad-hoc CLJS scripting on Node.js.

Status

Experimental. Please report issues here.

Goals and features

Nbb's main goal is to make it easy to get started with ad hoc CLJS scripting on Node.js.

Additional goals and features are:

  • Fast startup without relying on a custom version of Node.js.
  • Small artifact (current size is around 1.2MB).
  • First class macros.
  • Support building small TUI apps using Reagent.
  • Complement babashka with libraries from the Node.js ecosystem.

Requirements

Nbb requires Node.js v12 or newer.

How does this tool work?

CLJS code is evaluated through SCI, the same interpreter that powers babashka. Because SCI works with advanced compilation, the bundle size, especially when combined with other dependencies, is smaller than what you get with self-hosted CLJS. That makes startup faster. The trade-off is that execution is less performant and that only a subset of CLJS is available (e.g. no deftype, yet).

Usage

Install nbb from NPM:

$ npm install nbb -g

Omit -g for a local install.

Try out an expression:

$ nbb -e '(+ 1 2 3)'
6

And then install some other NPM libraries to use in the script. E.g.:

$ npm install csv-parse shelljs zx

Create a script which uses the NPM libraries:

(ns script
  (:require ["csv-parse/lib/sync$default" :as csv-parse]
            ["fs" :as fs]
            ["path" :as path]
            ["shelljs$default" :as sh]
            ["term-size$default" :as term-size]
            ["zx$default" :as zx]
            ["zx$fs" :as zxfs]
            [nbb.core :refer [*file*]]))

(prn (path/resolve "."))

(prn (term-size))

(println (count (str (fs/readFileSync *file*))))

(prn (sh/ls "."))

(prn (csv-parse "foo,bar"))

(prn (zxfs/existsSync *file*))

(zx/$ #js ["ls"])

Call the script:

$ nbb script.cljs
"/private/tmp/test-script"
#js {:columns 216, :rows 47}
510
#js ["node_modules" "package-lock.json" "package.json" "script.cljs"]
#js [#js ["foo" "bar"]]
true
$ ls
node_modules
package-lock.json
package.json
script.cljs

Macros

Nbb has first class support for macros: you can define them right inside your .cljs file, like you are used to from JVM Clojure. Consider the plet macro to make working with promises more palatable:

(defmacro plet
  [bindings & body]
  (let [binding-pairs (reverse (partition 2 bindings))
        body (cons 'do body)]
    (reduce (fn [body [sym expr]]
              (let [expr (list '.resolve 'js/Promise expr)]
                (list '.then expr (list 'clojure.core/fn (vector sym)
                                        body))))
            body
            binding-pairs)))

Using this macro we can look async code more like sync code. Consider this puppeteer example:

(-> (.launch puppeteer)
      (.then (fn [browser]
               (-> (.newPage browser)
                   (.then (fn [page]
                            (-> (.goto page "https://clojure.org")
                                (.then #(.screenshot page #js{:path "screenshot.png"}))
                                (.catch #(js/console.log %))
                                (.then #(.close browser)))))))))

Using plet this becomes:

(plet [browser (.launch puppeteer)
       page (.newPage browser)
       _ (.goto page "https://clojure.org")
       _ (-> (.screenshot page #js{:path "screenshot.png"})
             (.catch #(js/console.log %)))]
      (.close browser))

See the puppeteer example for the full code.

Since v0.0.36, nbb includes promesa which is a library to deal with promises. The above plet macro is similar to promesa.core/let.

Startup time

$ time nbb -e '(+ 1 2 3)'
6
nbb -e '(+ 1 2 3)'   0.17s  user 0.02s system 109% cpu 0.168 total

The baseline startup time for a script is about 170ms seconds on my laptop. When invoked via npx this adds another 300ms or so, so for faster startup, either use a globally installed nbb or use $(npm bin)/nbb script.cljs to bypass npx.

Dependencies

NPM dependencies

Nbb does not depend on any NPM dependencies. All NPM libraries loaded by a script are resolved relative to that script. When using the Reagent module, React is resolved in the same way as any other NPM library.

Classpath

To load .cljs files from local paths or dependencies, you can use the --classpath argument. The current dir is added to the classpath automatically. So if there is a file foo/bar.cljs relative to your current dir, then you can load it via (:require [foo.bar :as fb]). Note that nbb uses the same naming conventions for namespaces and directories as other Clojure tools: foo-bar in the namespace name becomes foo_bar in the directory name.

To load dependencies from the Clojure ecosystem, you can use the Clojure CLI or babashka to download them and produce a classpath:

$ classpath="$(clojure -A:nbb -Spath -Sdeps '{:aliases {:nbb {:replace-deps {com.github.seancorfield/honeysql {:git/tag "v2.0.0-rc5" :git/sha "01c3a55"}}}}}')"

and then feed it to the --classpath argument:

$ nbb --classpath "$classpath" -e "(require '[honey.sql :as sql]) (sql/format {:select :foo :from :bar :where [:= :baz 2]})"
["SELECT foo FROM bar WHERE baz = ?" 2]

Currently nbb only reads from directories, not jar files, so you are encouraged to use git libs. Support for .jar files will be added later.

Current file

The name of the file that is currently being executed is available via nbb.core/*file* or on the metadata of vars:

(ns foo
  (:require [nbb.core :refer [*file*]]))

(prn *file*) ;; "/private/tmp/foo.cljs"

(defn f [])
(prn (:file (meta #'f))) ;; "/private/tmp/foo.cljs"

Reagent

Nbb includes reagent.core which will be lazily loaded when required. You can use this together with ink to create a TUI application:

$ npm install ink

ink-demo.cljs:

(ns ink-demo
  (:require ["ink" :refer [render Text]]
            [reagent.core :as r]))

(defonce state (r/atom 0))

(doseq [n (range 1 11)]
  (js/setTimeout #(swap! state inc) (* n 500)))

(defn hello []
  [:> Text {:color "green"} "Hello, world! " @state])

(render (r/as-element [hello]))

Promesa

Working with callbacks and promises can become tedious. Since nbb v0.0.36 the promesa.core namespace is included with the let and do! macros. An example:

(ns prom
  (:require [promesa.core :as p]))

(defn sleep [ms]
  (js/Promise.
   (fn [resolve _]
     (js/setTimeout resolve ms))))

(defn do-stuff
  []
  (p/do!
   (println "Doing stuff which takes a while")
   (sleep 1000)
   1))

(p/let [a (do-stuff)
        b (inc a)
        c (do-stuff)
        d (+ b c)]
  (prn d))
$ nbb prom.cljs
Doing stuff which takes a while
Doing stuff which takes a while
3

Also see API docs.

Js-interop

Since nbb v0.0.75 applied-science/js-interop is available:

(ns example
  (:require [applied-science.js-interop :as j]))

(def o (j/lit {:a 1 :b 2 :c {:d 1}}))

(prn (j/select-keys o [:a :b])) ;; #js {:a 1, :b 2}
(prn (j/get-in o [:c :d])) ;; 1

Most of this library is supported in nbb, except the following:

  • destructuring using :syms
  • property access using .-x notation. In nbb, you must use keywords.

See the example of what is currently supported.

Examples

See the examples directory for small examples.

Also check out these projects built with nbb:

API

See API documentation.

Migrating to shadow-cljs

See this gist on how to convert an nbb script or project to shadow-cljs.

Build

Prequisites:

  • babashka >= 0.4.0
  • Clojure CLI >= 1.10.3.933
  • Node.js 16.5.0 (lower version may work, but this is the one I used to build)

To build:

  • Clone and cd into this repo
  • bb release

Run bb tasks for more project-related tasks.

Download Details:
Author: borkdude
Download Link: Download The Source Code
Official Website: https://github.com/borkdude/nbb 
License: EPL-1.0

#node #javascript

Brook  Hudson

Brook Hudson

1659396000

Humidifier: A Ruby tool for Managing AWS CloudFormation Stacks

Humidifier 

Humidifier is a ruby tool for managing AWS CloudFormation stacks. You can use it to build and manage stacks programmatically or you can use it as a command line tool to manage stacks through configuration files.

Installation

Add this line to your application's Gemfile:

gem 'humidifier'

And then execute:

$ bundle

Or install it yourself as:

$ gem install humidifier

Getting started

Stacks are represented by the Humidifier::Stack class. You can set any of the top-level JSON attributes (such as name and description) through the initializer.

Resources are represented by an exact mapping from AWS resource names to Humidifier resources names (e.g. AWS::EC2::Instance becomes Humidifier::EC2::Instance). Resources have accessors for each JSON attribute. Each attribute can also be set through the initialize, update, and update_attribute methods.

Example usage

The below example will create a stack with two resources, a loader balancer and an auto scaling group. It then deploys the new stack and pauses execution until the stack is finished being created.

stack = Humidifier::Stack.new(name: 'Example-Stack')

stack.add(
  'LoaderBalancer',
  Humidifier::ElasticLoadBalancing::LoadBalancer.new(
    scheme: 'internal',
    listeners: [
      {
        load_balancer_port: 80,
        protocol: 'http',
        instance_port: 80,
        instance_protocol: 'http'
      }
    ]
  )
)

stack.add(
  'AutoScalingGroup',
  Humidifier::AutoScaling::AutoScalingGroup.new(
    min_size: '1',
    max_size: '20',
    availability_zones: ['us-east-1a'],
    load_balancer_names: [Humidifier.ref('LoadBalancer')]
  )
)

stack.deploy_and_wait

Interfacing with AWS

Once stacks have the appropriate resources, you can query AWS to handle all stack CRUD operations. The operations themselves are intuitively named (i.e. #create, #update, #delete). There are also convenience methods for validating a stack body (#valid?), checking the existence of a stack (#exists?), and creating or updating based on existence (#deploy).

There are additionally four functions on Humidifier::Stack that support waiting for execution in AWS to finish. They all have non-blocking corollaries, and are named after them. They are: #create_and_wait, #update_and_wait, #delete_and_wait, and #deploy_and_wait.

CloudFormation functions

You can use CFN intrinsic functions and references using Humidifier.fn.[name] and Humidifier.ref. They will build appropriate structures that know how to be dumped to CFN syntax.

Change Sets

Instead of immediately pushing your changes to CloudFormation, Humidifier also supports change sets. Change sets are a powerful feature that allow you to see the changes that will be made before you make them. To read more about change sets see the announcement article. To use them in Humidifier, Humidifier::Stack has the #create_change_set and #deploy_change_set methods. The #create_change_set method will create a change set on the stack. The #deploy_change_set method will create a change set if the stack currently exists, and otherwise will create the stack.

Introspection

To see the template body, you can check the #to_cf method on stacks, resources, fns, and refs. All of them will output a hash of what will be uploaded (except the stack, which will output a string representation).

Humidifier itself contains a registry of all possible resources that it supports. You can access it with Humidifier::registry which is a hash of AWS resource name pointing to the class.

Resources have an ::aws_name method to see how AWS references them. They also contain a ::props method that contains a hash of the name that Humidifier uses to reference the prop pointing to the appropriate prop object.

Large templates

When templates are especially large (larger than 51,200 bytes), they cannot be uploaded directly through the AWS SDK. You can configure Humidifier to seamlessly upload the templates to S3 and reference them using an S3 URL instead by:

Humidifier.configure do |config|
  config.s3_bucket = 'my.s3.bucket'
  config.s3_prefix = 'my-prefix/' # optional
end

Forcing uploading

You can force a stack to upload its template to S3 regardless of the size of the template. This is a useful option if you're going to be deploying multiple copies of a template or if you want a backup. You can set this option on a per-stack basis:

stack.deploy(force_upload: true)

or globally, by setting the configuration option:

Humidifier.configure do |config|
  config.force_upload = true
end

CLI

Humidifier can also be used as a CLI for managing resources through configuration files. For a step-by-step guide, read on, but if you'd like to see a working example, check out the example directory.

To get started, build a ruby script (for example humidifier) that executes the Humidifier::CLI class, like so:

#!/usr/bin/env ruby
require 'humidifier'

Humidifier.configure do |config|
  # optional, defaults to the current working directory, so that all of the
  # directories from the location that you run the CLI are assumed to contain
  # resource specifications
  config.stack_path = 'stacks'

  # optional, a default prefix to use before deploying to AWS
  config.stack_prefix = 'humidifier-'

  # specifies that `users.yml` files contain specifications for `AWS::IAM::User`
  # resources
  config.map :users, to: 'IAM::User'
end

Humidifier::CLI.start(ARGV)

Resource files

Inside of the stacks directory configured above, create a subdirectory for each CloudFormation stack that you want to deploy. With the above configuration, we can create YAML files in the form of users.yml for each stack, which will specify IAM users to create. The file format looks like the below:

EngUser:
  path: /humidifier/
  user_name: EngUser
  groups:
  - Engineering
  - Testing
  - Deployment

AdminUser:
  path: /humidifier/
  user_name: AdminUser
  groups:
  - Management
  - Administration

The top-level keys are the logical resource names that will be displayed in the CloudFormation screen. They point to a map of key/value pairs that will be passed on to humidifier. Any humidifier (and therefore any CloudFormation) attribute may be specified. For more information on CloudFormation templates and which attributes may be specified, see both the humidifier docs and the CloudFormation docs.

Mappers

Oftentimes, specifying these attributes can become repetitive, e.g., each user should automatically receive the same "path" attribute. Other times, you may want custom logic to execute depending on which AWS environment you're running in. Finally, you may want to reference resources in the same or other stacks.

Humidifier's solution for this is to allow customized "mapper" classes to take the user-provided attributes and transform them into the attributes that CloudFormation expects. Consider the following example for mapping a user:

class UserMapper < Humidifier::Config::Mapper
  GROUPS = {
    'eng' => %w[Engineering Testing Deployment],
    'admin' => %w[Management Administration]
  }

  defaults do |logical_name|
    { path: '/humidifier/', user_name: logical_name }
  end

  attribute :group do |group|
    groups = GROUPS[group]
    groups.any? ? { groups: GROUPS[group] } : {}
  end
end

Humidifier.configure do |config|
  config.map :users, to: 'IAM::User', using: UserMapper
end

This means that by default, all entries in the users.yml files will get a /humidifier/ path, the user_name attribute will be set based on the logical name that was provided for the resource, and you can additionally specify a group attribute, even though it is not native to CloudFormation. With this group attribute, it will actually map to the groups attribute that CloudFormation expects.

With this new mapper in place, we can simplify our YAML file to:

EngUser:
  group: eng

AdminUser:
  group: admin

Using the CLI

Now that you've configured your CLI, your resources, and your mappers, you can use the CLI to display, validate, and deploy your infrastructure to CloudFormation. Run your script without any arguments to get the help message and explanations for each command.

Each command has an --aws-profile (or -p) option for specifying which profile to authenticate against when querying AWS. You should ensure that this profile has the correct permissions for creating whatever resources are going to part of your stack. You can also rely on the AWS_* environment variables, or the EC2 instance profile if you're deploying from an instance. For more information, see the AWS docs under the "Configuration" section.

Below are the list of commands and some of their options.

change [?stack]

Creates a change set for either the specified stack or all stacks in the repo. The change set represents the changes between what is currently deployed versus the resources represented by the configuration.

deploy [?stack] [*parameters]

Creates or updates (depending on if the stack already exists) one or all stacks in the repo.

The deploy command also allows a --prefix command line argument that will override the default prefix (if one is configured) for the stack that is being deployed. This is especially useful when you're deploying multiple copies of the same stack (for instance, multiple autoscaling groups) that have different purposes or semantically mean newer versions of resources.

display [stack] [?pattern]

Displays the specified stack in JSON format on the command line. If you optionally pass a pattern argument, it will filter the resources down to just ones whose names match the given pattern.

stacks

Displays the names of all of the stacks that humidifier is managing.

upgrade

Downloads the latest CloudFormation resource specification. Periodically AWS will update the file that humidifier is based on, in which case the attributes of the resources that were changed could change. This gem usually stays relatively in sync, but if you need to use the latest specs and this gem has not yet released a new version containing them, then you can run this command to download the latest specs onto your system.

upload [?stack]

Upload one or all stacks in the repo to S3 for reference later. Note that this must be combined with the humidifier s3_bucket configuration option.

validate [?stack]

Validate that one or all stacks in the repo are properly configured and using values that CloudFormation understands.

version

Output the version of Humidifier as well as the version of the CloudFormation resource specification that you are using.

Parameters

CloudFormation template parameters can be specified by having a special parameters.yml file in your stack directory. This file should contain a YAML-encoded object whose keys are the names of the parameters and whose values are the parameter configuration (using the same underscore paradigm as humidifier resources for specifying configuration).

You can pass values to the CLI deploy command after the stack name on the command line as in:

humidifier deploy foobar Param1=Foo Param2=Bar

Those parameters will get passed in as values when the stack is deployed.

Shortcuts

A couple of convenient shortcuts are built into humidifier so that writing templates and mappers both can be more concise.

Automatic id properties

There are a lot of properties in the AWS CloudFormation resource specification that are simply pointers to other entities within the AWS ecosystem. For example, an AWS::EC2::VPCGatewayAttachment entity has a VpcId property that represents the ID of the associated AWS::EC2::VPC.

Because this pattern is so common, humidifier detects all properties ending in Id and allows you to specify them without the suffix. If you choose to use this format, humidifier will automatically turn that value into a CloudFormation resource reference.

Anonymous mappers

A lot of the time, mappers that you create will not be overly complicated, especially if you're using automatic id properties. So, the config.map method optionally takes a block, and allows you to specify the mapper inline. This is recommended for mappers that aren't too complicated as to warrant their own class (for instance, for testing purposes). An example of this using the UserMapper from above is below:

Humidifier.configure do |config|
  config.map :users, to: 'IAM::User' do
    GROUPS = {
      'eng' => %w[Engineering Testing Deployment],
      'admin' => %w[Management Administration]
    }

    defaults do |logical_name|
      { path: '/humidifier/', user_name: logical_name }
    end

    attribute :group do |group|
      groups = GROUPS[group]
      groups.any? ? { groups: GROUPS[group] } : {}
    end
  end
end

Cross-stack references

AWS allows cross-stack references through the intrinsic Fn::ImportValue function. You can take advantage of this with humidifier by using the export: true option on resources in your stacks. For instance, if in one stack you have a subnet that you need to reference in another, you could (stacks/vpc/subnets.yml):

ProductionPrivateSubnet2a:
  vpc: ProductionVPC
  cidr_block: 10.0.0.0/19
  availability_zone: us-west-2a
  export: true

ProductionPrivateSubnet2b:
  vpc: ProductionVPC
  cidr_block: 10.0.64.0/19
  availability_zone: us-west-2b
  export: true

ProductionPrivateSubnet2c:
  vpc: ProductionVPC
  cidr_block: 10.0.128.0/19
  availability_zone: us-west-2c
  export: true

And then in another stack, you could reference those values (stacks/rds/db_subnets_groups.yml):

ProductionDBSubnetGroup:
  db_subnet_group_description: Production DB private subnet group
  subnets:
  - ProductionPrivateSubnet2a
  - ProductionPrivateSubnet2b
  - ProductionPrivateSubnet2c

Within the configuration, you would specify to use the Fn::ImportValue function like so:

Humidifier.configure do |config|
  config.stack_path = 'stacks'

  config.map :subnets, to: 'EC2::Subnet'

  config.map :db_subnet_groups, to: 'RDS::DBSubnetGroup' do
    attribute :subnets do |subnet_names|
      subnet_ids =
        subnet_names.map do |subnet_name|
          Humidifier.fn.import_value(subnet_name)
        end

      { subnet_ids: subnet_ids }
    end
  end
end

If you specify export: true it will by default export a reference to the resource listed in the stack. You can also choose to export a different attribute by specifying the attribute as the value to export. For example, if we were creating instance profiles and wanted to export the Arn so that it could be referenced by an instance later, we could:

APIRoleInstanceProfile:
  depends_on: APIRole
  roles:
  - APIRole
  export: Arn

Development

To get started, ensure you have ruby installed, version 2.4 or later. From there, install the bundler gem: gem install bundler and then bundle install in the root of the repository.

Testing

The default rake task runs the tests. Styling is governed by rubocop. The docs are generated with yard. To run all three of these, run:

$ bundle exec rake
$ bundle exec rubocop
$ bundle exec rake yard

Specs

The specs pulled from the CFN docs is saved to CloudFormationResourceSpecification.json. You can update it by running bundle exec rake specs. This script will pull down the latest resource specification to be used with Humidifier.

Contributing

Bug reports and pull requests are welcome on GitHub at https://github.com/kddnewton/humidifier.

License

The gem is available as open source under the terms of the MIT License.


Author: kddnewton
Source code: https://github.com/kddnewton/humidifier
License: MIT license

#ruby  #ruby-on-rails 

Mike  Kozey

Mike Kozey

1656151740

Test_cov_console: Flutter Console Coverage Test

Flutter Console Coverage Test

This small dart tools is used to generate Flutter Coverage Test report to console

How to install

Add a line like this to your package's pubspec.yaml (and run an implicit flutter pub get):

dev_dependencies:
  test_cov_console: ^0.2.2

How to run

run the following command to make sure all flutter library is up-to-date

flutter pub get
Running "flutter pub get" in coverage...                            0.5s

run the following command to generate lcov.info on coverage directory

flutter test --coverage
00:02 +1: All tests passed!

run the tool to generate report from lcov.info

flutter pub run test_cov_console
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File                                         |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
 print_cov_constants.dart                    |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|

Optional parameter

If not given a FILE, "coverage/lcov.info" will be used.
-f, --file=<FILE>                      The target lcov.info file to be reported
-e, --exclude=<STRING1,STRING2,...>    A list of contains string for files without unit testing
                                       to be excluded from report
-l, --line                             It will print Lines & Uncovered Lines only
                                       Branch & Functions coverage percentage will not be printed
-i, --ignore                           It will not print any file without unit testing
-m, --multi                            Report from multiple lcov.info files
-c, --csv                              Output to CSV file
-o, --output=<CSV-FILE>                Full path of output CSV file
                                       If not given, "coverage/test_cov_console.csv" will be used
-t, --total                            Print only the total coverage
                                       Note: it will ignore all other option (if any), except -m
-p, --pass=<MINIMUM>                   Print only the whether total coverage is passed MINIMUM value or not
                                       If the value >= MINIMUM, it will print PASSED, otherwise FAILED
                                       Note: it will ignore all other option (if any), except -m
-h, --help                             Show this help

example run the tool with parameters

flutter pub run test_cov_console --file=coverage/lcov.info --exclude=_constants,_mock
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File                                         |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|

report for multiple lcov.info files (-m, --multi)

It support to run for multiple lcov.info files with the followings directory structures:
1. No root module
<root>/<module_a>
<root>/<module_a>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/<module_a>/lib/src
<root>/<module_b>
<root>/<module_b>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/<module_b>/lib/src
...
2. With root module
<root>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/lib/src
<root>/<module_a>
<root>/<module_a>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/<module_a>/lib/src
<root>/<module_b>
<root>/<module_b>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/<module_b>/lib/src
...
You must run test_cov_console on <root> dir, and the report would be grouped by module, here is
the sample output for directory structure 'with root module':
flutter pub run test_cov_console --file=coverage/lcov.info --exclude=_constants,_mock --multi
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File                                         |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File - module_a -                            |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File - module_b -                            |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|

Output to CSV file (-c, --csv, -o, --output)

flutter pub run test_cov_console -c --output=coverage/test_coverage.csv

#### sample CSV output file:
File,% Branch,% Funcs,% Lines,Uncovered Line #s
lib/,,,,
test_cov_console.dart,0.00,0.00,0.00,no unit testing
lib/src/,,,,
parser.dart,100.00,100.00,97.22,"97"
parser_constants.dart,100.00,100.00,100.00,""
print_cov.dart,100.00,100.00,82.91,"29,49,51,52,171,174,177,180,183,184,185,186,187,188,279,324,325,387,388,389,390,391,392,393,394,395,398"
print_cov_constants.dart,0.00,0.00,0.00,no unit testing
All files with unit testing,100.00,100.00,86.07,""

Installing

Use this package as an executable

Install it

You can install the package from the command line:

dart pub global activate test_cov_console

Use it

The package has the following executables:

$ test_cov_console

Use this package as a library

Depend on it

Run this command:

With Dart:

 $ dart pub add test_cov_console

With Flutter:

 $ flutter pub add test_cov_console

This will add a line like this to your package's pubspec.yaml (and run an implicit dart pub get):

dependencies:
  test_cov_console: ^0.2.2

Alternatively, your editor might support dart pub get or flutter pub get. Check the docs for your editor to learn more.

Import it

Now in your Dart code, you can use:

import 'package:test_cov_console/test_cov_console.dart';

example/lib/main.dart

import 'package:flutter/material.dart';

void main() {
  runApp(MyApp());
}

class MyApp extends StatelessWidget {
  // This widget is the root of your application.
  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return MaterialApp(
      title: 'Flutter Demo',
      theme: ThemeData(
        // This is the theme of your application.
        //
        // Try running your application with "flutter run". You'll see the
        // application has a blue toolbar. Then, without quitting the app, try
        // changing the primarySwatch below to Colors.green and then invoke
        // "hot reload" (press "r" in the console where you ran "flutter run",
        // or simply save your changes to "hot reload" in a Flutter IDE).
        // Notice that the counter didn't reset back to zero; the application
        // is not restarted.
        primarySwatch: Colors.blue,
        // This makes the visual density adapt to the platform that you run
        // the app on. For desktop platforms, the controls will be smaller and
        // closer together (more dense) than on mobile platforms.
        visualDensity: VisualDensity.adaptivePlatformDensity,
      ),
      home: MyHomePage(title: 'Flutter Demo Home Page'),
    );
  }
}

class MyHomePage extends StatefulWidget {
  MyHomePage({Key? key, required this.title}) : super(key: key);

  // This widget is the home page of your application. It is stateful, meaning
  // that it has a State object (defined below) that contains fields that affect
  // how it looks.

  // This class is the configuration for the state. It holds the values (in this
  // case the title) provided by the parent (in this case the App widget) and
  // used by the build method of the State. Fields in a Widget subclass are
  // always marked "final".

  final String title;

  @override
  _MyHomePageState createState() => _MyHomePageState();
}

class _MyHomePageState extends State<MyHomePage> {
  int _counter = 0;

  void _incrementCounter() {
    setState(() {
      // This call to setState tells the Flutter framework that something has
      // changed in this State, which causes it to rerun the build method below
      // so that the display can reflect the updated values. If we changed
      // _counter without calling setState(), then the build method would not be
      // called again, and so nothing would appear to happen.
      _counter++;
    });
  }

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    // This method is rerun every time setState is called, for instance as done
    // by the _incrementCounter method above.
    //
    // The Flutter framework has been optimized to make rerunning build methods
    // fast, so that you can just rebuild anything that needs updating rather
    // than having to individually change instances of widgets.
    return Scaffold(
      appBar: AppBar(
        // Here we take the value from the MyHomePage object that was created by
        // the App.build method, and use it to set our appbar title.
        title: Text(widget.title),
      ),
      body: Center(
        // Center is a layout widget. It takes a single child and positions it
        // in the middle of the parent.
        child: Column(
          // Column is also a layout widget. It takes a list of children and
          // arranges them vertically. By default, it sizes itself to fit its
          // children horizontally, and tries to be as tall as its parent.
          //
          // Invoke "debug painting" (press "p" in the console, choose the
          // "Toggle Debug Paint" action from the Flutter Inspector in Android
          // Studio, or the "Toggle Debug Paint" command in Visual Studio Code)
          // to see the wireframe for each widget.
          //
          // Column has various properties to control how it sizes itself and
          // how it positions its children. Here we use mainAxisAlignment to
          // center the children vertically; the main axis here is the vertical
          // axis because Columns are vertical (the cross axis would be
          // horizontal).
          mainAxisAlignment: MainAxisAlignment.center,
          children: <Widget>[
            Text(
              'You have pushed the button this many times:',
            ),
            Text(
              '$_counter',
              style: Theme.of(context).textTheme.headline4,
            ),
          ],
        ),
      ),
      floatingActionButton: FloatingActionButton(
        onPressed: _incrementCounter,
        tooltip: 'Increment',
        child: Icon(Icons.add),
      ), // This trailing comma makes auto-formatting nicer for build methods.
    );
  }
}

Author: DigitalKatalis
Source Code: https://github.com/DigitalKatalis/test_cov_console 
License: BSD-3-Clause license

#flutter #dart #test 

Eva  Murphy

Eva Murphy

1625674200

Google analytics Setup with Next JS, React JS using Router Events - 14

In this video, we are going to implement Google Analytics to our Next JS application. Tracking page views of an application is very important.

Google analytics will allow us to track analytics information.

Frontend: https://github.com/amitavroy/video-reviews
API: https://github.com/amitavdevzone/video-review-api
App link: https://video-reviews.vercel.app

You can find me on:
Twitter: https://twitter.com/amitavroy7​
Discord: https://discord.gg/Em4nuvQk

#next js #js #react js #react #next #google analytics