Eugene  Lockman

Eugene Lockman

1630668660

Top 10 DevOps Monitoring Tools

Here is a list of the best DevOps monitoring tools. These tools will help you to gear up for your work and progress in your career.

  1. Sensu
  2. PagerDuty
  3. Datical Deployment Monitoring Console
  4. Tasktop Integration Hub
  5. Librato
  6. Prometheus
  7. Kibana
  8. Splunk
  9. Nagios
  10. Dynatrace

#devops 

 


 

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Top 10 DevOps Monitoring Tools

How to Extend your DevOps Strategy For Success in the Cloud?

DevOps and Cloud computing are joined at the hip, now that fact is well appreciated by the organizations that engaged in SaaS cloud and developed applications in the Cloud. During the COVID crisis period, most of the organizations have started using cloud computing services and implementing a cloud-first strategy to establish their remote operations. Similarly, the extended DevOps strategy will make the development process more agile with automated test cases.

According to the survey in EMEA, IT decision-makers have observed a 129%* improvement in the overall software development process when performing DevOps on the Cloud. This success result was just 81% when practicing only DevOps and 67%* when leveraging Cloud without DevOps. Not only that, but the practice has also made the software predictability better, improve the customer experience as well as speed up software delivery 2.6* times faster.

3 Core Principle to fit DevOps Strategy

If you consider implementing DevOps in concert with the Cloud, then the

below core principle will guide you to utilize the strategy.

  • It is indispensable to follow a continuous process, including all stages from Dev to deploy with the help of auto-provisioning resources of the target platform.
  • The team always keeps an eye on major and minor application changes that can typically appear within a few hours of development to operation. However, the support of unlimited resource provisioning is needed at the stage of deployment.
  • Cloud or hybrid configuration can associate this process, but you must confirm that configuration should support multiple cloud brands like Microsoft, AWS, Google, any public and private cloud models.

Guide to Remold Business with DevOps and Cloud

Companies are now re-inventing themselves to become better at sensing the next big thing their customers need and finding ways with the Cloud based DevOps to get ahead of the competition.

#devops #devops-principles #azure-devops #devops-transformation #good-company #devops-tools #devops-top-story #devops-infrastructure

Vern  Greenholt

Vern Greenholt

1595474520

10 Best Tools for DevOps You’ve Never Heard About - DZone DevOps

If you’re an experienced DevOps engineer you want to find the most efficient tools for your work. However, the variety of services available is so big that you physically can’t try them all. That’s the reason why the majority of DevOps engineers limit themselves to a shortlist of tools such as Docker, Jenkins, Kubernetes, Puppet, or Ansible without ever attempting to change anything. But many great tools fit your current tech stack and can take your efficiency to a new level. To help you, I have created this list of great DevOps tools that you probably haven’t heard about before.

It’s time to try something new! All the tools below offer trials or free plans. So you can try them and see if something fits your needs. Many of them will not replace your existing stack but supplement it.

Please, share in the comments which tools you already knew about and which you’ll try after reading this article.

StatusGator

Free plan: Yes, the application has a very generous free plan with ample functionality for many small DevOps teams and individuals and developers.

Paid plans start from $29.99 per month

Have you ever had a problem you’ve worked on for 3 hours in a row and only afterward discovered that the issue was in one of your third-party tools or cloud services, or that an API you use was down? This will never, ever happen again with StatusGator.

This application will help keep you informed about the state of all your dependencies and send notifications via Slack, Teams, Discord, Flowdock, email, SMS, or even webhook. StatusGator reads the status pages of around 800 cloud services, parsing them into a centralized feed for you. If you want to know if Intercom is down or not, be aware of Mailgun outages, monitor the Google Cloud status or understand the current state of any other services, StatusGator will help you to understand all this.

If you care about reducing your downtime, you should sign up for StatusGator right now. Otherwise, you’re just wasting time and not staying informed. This app has a free plan, so you don’t even need any budget to start. I saved what could have been a full day’s work when an API failed and I knew what the core reason was right away, thanks to StatusGator. So I’m ready to buy a round of drinks for the StatusGator team right now! :)

Talking about budget, the paid plan has a reasonable price and starts at only $29.99 per month. Just remember the cost of downtime to understand how worthwhile this investment is. It doesn’t take much time at all to recoup that investment.

Sign up here for free!

Dead Man’s Snitch

Free plan: Yes

Paid plan starts from $5 for individuals and $19 for teams per month.

If you have daily backups or cron jobs, and you need monitoring then Dead Man’s Snitch can help you to achieve it. With this service, you can monitor Heroku Scheduler, cron jobs, or any task from any task scheduler. If something doesn’t execute, the application alerts you, so you can react in a good time.

Dead Man’s Snitch helps to create ‘snitches’ for every service you need to monitor. Also, the application creates a special URL for these services, thus you can make requests via a browser. It has a free plan and three different paid plans for individuals and teams.

FireHydrant

Free plan: yes, but with limited functions

Paid plan starts from $129 per month

Like a real fire hydrant helps to put out fires, this tool will help you put out “fires” at work by receiving timely alerts and other cool features. It helps document the system, integrate the tools you already use, and gather data and alerts for handling incidents.

FireHydrant will help you to connect team members, servers, features, and applications in one infrastructure graph. With this single tool, you can finally stop using spreadsheets and automate all your documentation. Also, FireHydrant provides public customer-facing status pages, thus you can inform users promptly if you need to.

This application has a free plan with limited functions but it’s enough to understand if it suits your team. The paid plan starts from $129 per month for 5 team members. A plan for 10 members costs $600.

Clustered

Free plan: Yes

**Paid plan **starts from $29 per month billed annually or $39 per month billed monthly

Clustered will help you with every step of the software development process. It automates many actions allowing you to concentrate on the code without infrastructure management. Clustered helps you to automate deployment and scaling, and resolve problems before your users even notice them. It can replace familiar tools like CircleCI, Jenkins, or GitLab. Thus, you can save a lot of time and reinvest it only on coding. Clustered works with Node.js, Vue.js, Python, PHP, and other popular languages. It provides CI/CD and managed container hosting in a development platform.

The main idea of Clustered is to simplify the software development process. It provides DevOps automation and container orchestration with a simple and understandable interface and lots of integrations, including AWS, Google Cloud, and Azure. Clustered has a 14-day free trial and a paid plan from $29 to $99 per month.

#devops #software #devops tools #tools for developers #devops tool

Madelyn  Frami

Madelyn Frami

1599814380

Automating Security in DevOps: Top 15 Tools

Cybersecurity is a big concern for many companies. With data breaches happening more and more as attacks increase in sophistication, teams are looking at all of the options they have to prevent them.

Since DevOps has taken root as the standard way to deploy applications to production, it’s worth figuring out how to include security in your CI/CD pipelines.

Background on DevSecOps

There’s already a field dedicated to adding security to your existing DevOps flow called DevSecOps. Instead of waiting until the end of the process to run security checks, like in the Waterfall method, you include them throughout the different run stages. In DevSecOps, this is referred to as “shifting to the left”.

It’s called this because you move things that are traditionally at the end of the deployment cycle to happen earlier in the process. You’re able to use multiple automated tools to run checks for cross-site scripting, SQL injection, and to check for any other of the OWASP Top 10 security risks.

You still need security experts to interpret the results and ensure there are not many false positives, but adding security in your CI/CD pipeline helps automate a lot of processes that were manual before.

This saves time on getting deployments out to customers because you don’t have to wait until the end to learn about security risks. That means the code won’t need to be updated at the last minute, which always causes delays.

A number of tools are available to help you do security checks at every phase of your CI/CD run. A basic CI/CD pipeline will include a build phase, testing phase, delivery phase, and finally a deploy phase.

The goal with DevSecOps is to shift security to the left or to move the checks to earlier parts of the process.

We’ll go over 15 of the top DevSecOps tools and which phases they help find vulnerabilities at.

#devops #devops-tools #devops-security #devsecops #improve-devsecops #cicd #pipeline #devops-top-story

50+ Useful DevOps Tools

The article comprises both very well established tools for those who are new to the DevOps methodology.

What Is DevOps?

The DevOps methodology, a software and team management approach defined by the portmanteau of Development and Operations, was first coined in 2009 and has since become a buzzword concept in the IT field.

DevOps has come to mean many things to each individual who uses the term as DevOps is not a singularly defined standard, software, or process but more of a culture. Gartner defines DevOps as:

“DevOps represents a change in IT culture, focusing on rapid IT service delivery through the adoption of agile, lean practices in the context of a system-oriented approach. DevOps emphasizes people (and culture), and seeks to improve collaboration between operations and development teams. DevOps implementations utilize technology — especially automation tools that can leverage an increasingly programmable and dynamic infrastructure from a life cycle perspective.”

As you can see from the above definition, DevOps is a multi-faceted approach to the Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC), but its main underlying strength is how it leverages technology and software to streamline this process. So with the right approach to DevOps, notably adopting its philosophies of co-operation and implementing the right tools, your business can increase deployment frequency by a factor of 30 and lead times by a factor of 8000 over traditional methods, according to a CapGemini survey.

The Right Tools for the Job

This list is designed to be as comprehensive as possible. The article comprises both very well established tools for those who are new to the DevOps methodology and those tools that are more recent releases to the market — either way, there is bound to be a tool on here that can be an asset for you and your business. For those who already live and breathe DevOps, we hope you find something that will assist you in your growing enterprise.

With such a litany of tools to choose from, there is no “right” answer to what tools you should adopt. No single tool will cover all your needs and will be deployed across a variety of development and Operational teams, so let’s break down what you need to consider before choosing what tool might work for you.

  • Plan and collaborate: Before you even begin the SDLC, your business needs to have a cohesive idea of what tools they’ll need to implement across your teams. There are even DevOps tools that can assist you with this first crucial step.
  • Build: Here you want tools that create identically provisioned environments. The last you need is to hear “But it works for me on my computer”
  • Automation: This has quickly become a given in DevOps, but automation will always drastically increase production over manual methods.
  • Continuous Integration: Tools need to provide constant and immediate feedback, several times a day but not all integrations are implemented equally, will the tool you select be right for the job?
  • Deployment: Deployments need to be kept predictable, smooth, and reliable with minimal risks, automation will also play a big part in this process.

With all that in mind, I hope this selection of tools will aid you as your business continues to expand into the DevOps lifestyle.

Tools Categories List:

Infrastructure As Code

Continuous Integration and Delivery

Development Automation

Usability Testing

Database and Big Data

Monitoring

Testing

Security

Helpful CLI Tools

Development

Visualization

Infrastructure As Code

#AWSCloudFormation

1. AWS CloudFormation

AWS CloudFormation is an absolute must if you are currently working, or planning to work, in the AWS Cloud. CloudFormation allows you to model your AWS infrastructure and provision all your AWS resources swiftly and easily. All of this is done within a JSON or YAML template file and the service comes with a variety of automation features ensuring your deployments will be predictable, reliable, and manageable.

Link: https://aws.amazon.com/cloudformation/

2. Azure Resource Manager

Azure Resource Manager (ARM) is Microsoft’s answer to an all-encompassing IAC tool. With its ARM templates, described within JSON files, Azure Resource Manager will provision your infrastructure, handle dependencies, and declare multiple resources via a single template.

Link: https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/features/resource-manager/

#Google Cloud Deployment Manager

3. Google Cloud Deployment Manager

Much like the tools mentioned above, Google Cloud Deployment Manager is Google’s IAC tool for the Google Cloud Platform. This tool utilizes YAML for its config files and JINJA2 or PYTHON for its templates. Some of its notable features are synchronistic deployment and ‘preview’, allowing you an overhead view of changes before they are committed.

Link: https://cloud.google.com/deployment-manager/

4. Terraform

Terraform is brought to you by HashiCorp, the makers of Vault and Nomad. Terraform is vastly different from the above-mentioned tools in that it is not restricted to a specific cloud environment, this comes with increased benefits for tackling complex distributed applications without being tied to a single platform. And much like Google Cloud Deployment Manager, Terraform also has a preview feature.

Link: https://www.terraform.io/

#Chef

5. Chef

Chef is an ideal choice for those who favor CI/CD. At its heart, Chef utilizes self-described recipes, templates, and cookbooks; a collection of ready-made templates. Cookbooks allow for consistent configuration even as your infrastructure rapidly scales. All of this is wrapped up in a beautiful Ruby-based DSL pie.

Link: https://www.chef.io/products/chef-infra/

#Ansible

#tools #devops #devops 2020 #tech tools #tool selection #tool comparison

Carmen  Grimes

Carmen Grimes

1598959140

How to Monitor Third Party API Integrations

Many enterprises and SaaS companies depend on a variety of external API integrations in order to build an awesome customer experience. Some integrations may outsource certain business functionality such as handling payments or search to companies like Stripe and Algolia. You may have integrated other partners which expand the functionality of your product offering, For example, if you want to add real-time alerts to an analytics tool, you might want to integrate the PagerDuty and Slack APIs into your application.

If you’re like most companies though, you’ll soon realize you’re integrating hundreds of different vendors and partners into your app. Any one of them could have performance or functional issues impacting your customer experience. Worst yet, the reliability of an integration may be less visible than your own APIs and backend. If the login functionality is broken, you’ll have many customers complaining they cannot log into your website. However, if your Slack integration is broken, only the customers who added Slack to their account will be impacted. On top of that, since the integration is asynchronous, your customers may not realize the integration is broken until after a few days when they haven’t received any alerts for some time.

How do you ensure your API integrations are reliable and high performing? After all, if you’re selling a feature real-time alerting, you’re alerts better well be real-time and have at least once guaranteed delivery. Dropping alerts because your Slack or PagerDuty integration is unacceptable from a customer experience perspective.

What to monitor

Latency

Specific API integrations that have an exceedingly high latency could be a signal that your integration is about to fail. Maybe your pagination scheme is incorrect or the vendor has not indexed your data in the best way for you to efficiently query.

Latency best practices

Average latency only tells you half the story. An API that consistently takes one second to complete is usually better than an API with high variance. For example if an API only takes 30 milliseconds on average, but 1 out of 10 API calls take up to five seconds, then you have high variance in your customer experience. This is makes it much harder to track down bugs and harder to handle in your customer experience. This is why 90th percentile and 95th percentiles are important to look at.

Reliability

Reliability is a key metric to monitor especially since your integrating APIs that you don’t have control over. What percent of API calls are failing? In order to track reliability, you should have a rigid definition on what constitutes a failure.

Reliability best practices

While any API call that has a response status code in the 4xx or 5xx family may be considered an error, you might have specific business cases where the API appears to successfully complete yet the API call should still be considered a failure. For example, a data API integration that returns no matches or no content consistently could be considered failing even though the status code is always 200 OK. Another API could be returning bogus or incomplete data. Data validation is critical for measuring where the data returned is correct and up to date.

Not every API provider and integration partner follows suggested status code mapping

Availability

While reliability is specific to errors and functional correctness, availability and uptime is a pure infrastructure metric that measures how often a service has an outage, even if temporary. Availability is usually measured as a percentage of uptime per year or number of 9’s.

AVAILABILITY %DOWNTIME PER YEARDOWNTIME PER MONTHDOWNTIME PER WEEKDOWNTIME PER DAY90% (“one nine”)36.53 days73.05 hours16.80 hours2.40 hours99% (“two nines”)3.65 days7.31 hours1.68 hours14.40 minutes99.9% (“three nines”)8.77 hours43.83 minutes10.08 minutes1.44 minutes99.99% (“four nines”)52.60 minutes4.38 minutes1.01 minutes8.64 seconds99.999% (“five nines”)5.26 minutes26.30 seconds6.05 seconds864.00 milliseconds99.9999% (“six nines”)31.56 seconds2.63 seconds604.80 milliseconds86.40 milliseconds99.99999% (“seven nines”)3.16 seconds262.98 milliseconds60.48 milliseconds8.64 milliseconds99.999999% (“eight nines”)315.58 milliseconds26.30 milliseconds6.05 milliseconds864.00 microseconds99.9999999% (“nine nines”)31.56 milliseconds2.63 milliseconds604.80 microseconds86.40 microseconds

Usage

Many API providers are priced on API usage. Even if the API is free, they most likely have some sort of rate limiting implemented on the API to ensure bad actors are not starving out good clients. This means tracking your API usage with each integration partner is critical to understand when your current usage is close to the plan limits or their rate limits.

Usage best practices

It’s recommended to tie usage back to your end-users even if the API integration is quite downstream from your customer experience. This enables measuring the direct ROI of specific integrations and finding trends. For example, let’s say your product is a CRM, and you are paying Clearbit $199 dollars a month to enrich up to 2,500 companies. That is a direct cost you have and is tied to your customer’s usage. If you have a free tier and they are using the most of your Clearbit quota, you may want to reconsider your pricing strategy. Potentially, Clearbit enrichment should be on the paid tiers only to reduce your own cost.

How to monitor API integrations

Monitoring API integrations seems like the correct remedy to stay on top of these issues. However, traditional Application Performance Monitoring (APM) tools like New Relic and AppDynamics focus more on monitoring the health of your own websites and infrastructure. This includes infrastructure metrics like memory usage and requests per minute along with application level health such as appdex scores and latency. Of course, if you’re consuming an API that’s running in someone else’s infrastructure, you can’t just ask your third-party providers to install an APM agent that you have access to. This means you need a way to monitor the third-party APIs indirectly or via some other instrumentation methodology.

#monitoring #api integration #api monitoring #monitoring and alerting #monitoring strategies #monitoring tools #api integrations #monitoring microservices