Edward Jackson

Edward Jackson

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How to build a React App from scratch

React is an awesome way to build web UIs. This post will show you how to build a React application from scratch using the Stormpath React SDK to add features that allow people to sign up, login, and even view their own user profile.

Let’s get started!

You’ll first need to create a Stormpath account and application, which you can do here: https://api.stormpath.com/register

Table of Contents

  • Install the React + Express.js Application Stack
  • Set up the React + Express.js Project
  • How Does React Work?
  • Master Page
  • Index Page
  • Login Page
  • Registration Page
  • Profile Page
  • Home Route
  • Logout
  • User State in Components
  • Import Components
  • Run The Project
  • Wrapping Up

Install the React + Express.js Application Stack

Since we’re building our application from scratch, we’ll use ES6 and JSX to write as little code as possible, as well as the Stormpath React SDK for user features.

Here’s an overview of what we’ll be using:

  • React - Allows us to compose simple yet powerful UIs.
  • ReactRouter - Organizes the URL navigation in our React application.
  • ES6 - The next version of JavaScript. Allows us to write real JavaScript classes.
  • JSX - Allows us to place HTML in JavaScript without concatenating strings.
  • Stormpath - Allows us to store and authenticate users without having to create our own backend for it.
  • Stormpath React SDK - Integrates Stormpath into our React application with very little effort.
  • Express - Allows us to serve our HTML and JavaScript files.
  • Express Stormpath - Allows us to serve Stormpath’s API through Express.
  • Webpack - Allows us to pack all of our JavaScript files into one bundle.
  • Babel - Allows us to transpile our ES6 and JSX into ES5.
  • Bootstrap - Because we want things to be pretty.

Set up the React + Express.js Project

How to build a React App from scratch

Start by creating a new project directory and a package.json file for it.

$ mkdir my-react-app
$ cd my-react-app
$ npm init --yes

Now install Express and the Stormpath module for Express:

$ npm install --save express express-stormpath body-parser

We need a server to host our application, so create a new file named server.js and put the code below in it:

var express = require('express');
var stormpath = require('express-stormpath');

var app = express();

app.use(stormpath.init(app, {
  web: {
    produces: ['application/json']
  }
}));

app.on('stormpath.ready', function () {
  app.listen(3000, 'localhost', function (err) {
    if (err) {
      return console.error(err);
    }
    console.log('Listening at http://localhost:3000');
  });
});

Awesome. Now we can hook that up to a Stormpath Application by creating a new file named stormpath.yml with the following code in it. And yeah, you do have to replace those values in it with your own.

client:
  apiKey:
    id: YOUR_API_KEY_ID
    secret: YOUR_API_KEY_SECRET
application:
  href: https://api.stormpath.com/v1/applications/XXXX <-- YOUR APP HREF

So far so good. Now try the server by running $ node server.js. If everything is set up correctly then you should see:

Listening at http://localhost:3000

If you saw that message, you’ve successfully configured your server to talk with Stormpath and expose a REST API for our React application to use.

Configuring Webpack

React App Authentication

Before you get too excited, kill the server and install Webpack so that we can package all of our client-side scripts (we’ll need this organization soon).

$ npm install --save webpack
$ npm install --save-dev webpack-dev-middleware

Configure Webpack by creating a new file named webpack.config.js and put the code below in it:

var path = require('path');
var webpack = require('webpack');

module.exports = {
  entry: [
    './src/app'
  ],
  devtool: 'eval-source-map',
  output: {
    path: __dirname,
    filename: 'app.js',
    publicPath: '/js/'
  },
  module: {
    loaders: []
  }
};

What this will do is look in our /src/ directory (that we’ll create shortly) and package all of the scripts and their dependencies under that directory as one module. Then use the file /src/app.js and its exports as the export of that module. Then finally when it has generated that module package, it will serve that through Express under the /js/app.js endpoint.

But in order for Express to serve webpack files, we have to open up server.js and add these lines to the top of it:

var webpack = require('webpack');
var config = require('./webpack.config');

Then immediately after the line var app = express(); add:

var compiler = webpack(config);

app.use(require('webpack-dev-middleware')(compiler, {
  noInfo: true,
  publicPath: config.output.publicPath
}));

As I mentioned before, this will allow Webpack to intercept requests and serve our packaged /js/app.js file.

Configuring Babel

How to build a React App from scratch

Since we’ll be using ES6and JSX, we need to transpile these files into ES5 (for backwards compatibility with non-modern browsers). This is where Babel comes in. Babel can take our ES6/JSX files as input, and convert those to ES5.

To use Babel, start by installing some dependencies:

$ npm install --save babel-core babel-runtime babel-loader babel-plugin-react-transform \
  babel-preset-es2015 babel-preset-react babel-preset-stage-0

Now we’ll instruct Babel on how to compile our files, so create a new file named .babelrc and add this code it:

{
  "presets": ["stage-0", "es2015", "react"]
}

Finally, in order to get Babel to work with Webpack, we need to edit webpack.config.js and add an entry to the module.loaders array, as shown below:

module: {
  loaders: [{
    test: /\.js$/,
    loaders: ['babel'],
    include: path.join(__dirname, 'src')
  }]
}

Index.html and Bootstrap

How to build a React App from scratch

Now, before getting our hands dirty with React, we’ll prepare the entry page for our app. This page will tell the browser what it must load before we initialize React and our application. So create a new directory named build, then within that, put a file named index.html. Our server will serve all of our static files from this folder.

$ mkdir build
$ cd build
$ touch index.html

Then within index.html, put the following:







  
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
  
  
    

    
  

Also, under the build directory, create a new directory named css and download Bootstrap to it. Name the file bootstrap.min.css.

$ mkdir css
$ cd css
$ curl -O https://maxcdn.bootstrapcdn.com/bootstrap/3.3.6/css/bootstrap.min.css
$ cd ../.. # return to /my-react-app

Now in order for our browser to be able to access these files we need to configure them so that they are served through Express. So open up server.js and at the top of the file add:

var path = require('path');

Then under the line app.use(stormpath.init(app, ...)); add:

app.get('/css/bootstrap.min.css', function (req, res) {
  res.sendFile(path.join(__dirname, 'build/css/bootstrap.min.css'));
});

app.get('*', function (req, res) {
  res.sendFile(path.join(__dirname, 'build/index.html'));
});

How Does React Work?

How to build a React App from scratch

Now that we have the skeleton for our app done, we can focus on building our React app. But before we write any code, let’s take a look at what React is and what it does for us.

Components

How to build a React App from scratch

In React, everything is built upon components. You can think of a component as something that renders a DOM node. A simple React component looks like this:

class HelloWorld extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return Hello World!;
  }
}

That was simple. Now, if you wanted to render this component to a page, then all you’d have to do is import React and then call:

ReactDOM.render(
  ,
  document.getElementById('hello-world-element')
);

And React would render the component to that element.

There are, of course, more things to a React component, such as state. Below is an example of a counter component that starts counting when added to the DOM and stops when removed.

class Counter extends React.Component {
  state = {
    current: 0
  }

  constructor() {
    super(arguments...);
    this.intervalId = null;
  }

  updateCounter() {
    this.setState({ counter: this.state.current + 1 });
  }

  componentWillMount() {
    this.setState({ counter: this.props.from || 0 });
    this.intervalId = setInterval(this.updateCounter.bind(this), 1000);
  }

  componentWillUnmount() {
    clearInterval(this.intervalId);
  }

  render() {
    return { this.state.current };
  }
}

Notice the methods componentWillMount() and componentWillUnmount(). These are component life-cycle methods that will be executed at various points of a component’s life-cycle (in this case, mount and unmount). These methods are usually used for setting up and tearing down a component and is necessary to use because React will error if you try to set the state of a component when it hasn’t been mounted yet.

Also notice this.props.from. The member this.props is a collection of all the properties (inputs) passed to a component. Properties of a component can be set as shown below:



JSX Variables

Variables can easily be interpolated into your JSX DOM using { nameOfVariable }, e.g. as shown below:

render() {
  var myVariable = 123;
  return { myVariable };
}

JSX and Reserved JavaScript Identifiers

How to build a React App from scratch

Since JSX is JavaScript, there are some caveats that you need to know when working with React. I.e. when setting properties of a React DOM component you cannot use neither for or class since those are considered reserved JavaScript identifiers. To get around this problem, React has come up with htmlFor and className that you should use instead.

To illustrate the issue, this won’t work:

<label for="my-input" class="my-label">My Input</label>

But this will:

<label htmlFor="my-input" className="my-label">My Input</label>

Virtual DOM

How to build a React App from scratch

Instead of working directly against the DOM, in React all components are kept in their own virtual DOM. You can think of the virtual DOM as a DOM implementation in JavaScript (because it actually is). This virtual DOM is then mapped to a real DOM element. So when you render your React component, React will look at the DOM output from the component, compare it to its representation in the virtual DOM, and then generate a patch for the real DOM.

What this means is that you never have to think of manually manipulating DOM elements again. All you have to do is tell React how you want your component to look like, and it will take care of transforming the DOM the ways necessary (with minimal effort).

Installing React Dependencies

Now when we are acquainted with React, we’ll kick things off by installing some React dependencies:

$ npm install --save react react-dom react-router react-stormpath react-document-title history

Before we start coding, we need a place to put our React files, so create a new directory named src, and then use that as your working directory.

$ mkdir src
$ cd src

Now, let’s start with the entry point of our app. This will be the place where we will set up our React application and its routing. So create a new file named app.js and enter this code:

import React from 'react';
import ReactDOM from 'react-dom';
import { Router, IndexRoute, Route, browserHistory } from 'react-router';

ReactDOM.render(
  
  ,
  document.getElementById('app-container')
);

So now we have a foundation for our application. Let’s go ahead and import the Stormpath SDK and some things we’ll need in it. At the top of your app.js file, add the import statement:

import ReactStormpath, { Router, HomeRoute, LoginRoute, AuthenticatedRoute } from 'react-stormpath';

As you can see in app.js there’s now two conflicting Router imports. Since [ReactStormpath.Router](https://github.com/stormpath/stormpath-sdk-react/blob/master/docs/api.md#router) extends from [ReactRouter.Router](https://github.com/rackt/react-router/blob/master/docs/API.md#router) we won’t be needing that anymore. So go ahead and remove the Router import from react-router. Important: Leave the other ReactRouter imports, we’ll be needing those later.

Now, we’ll initialize the Stormpath SDK. Add the following line right above [ReactDOM.render()](https://facebook.github.io/react/blog/2015/10/01/react-render-and-top-level-api.html).

ReactStormpath.init();

That was easy! We’re now ready to start building our pages.

Master Page

Before we create our pages, we have to set up our router. The router is what determines how we’ll be able to navigate around in our application. We’ll start by creating a shared root route. This will act as our “master page”. I.e. all routes under this route will all share the same master component (header). So place the codebelow inside the `` tag in your app.js so that it looks like:


  
  

As you can see, we have referenced MasterPage. Something that doesn’t exist yet. So let’s go ahead and create that in a new directory that we’ll name pages, in our src folder.

$ mkdir pages
$ cd pages

Now create a new file named MasterPage.js and add this code to it:

import React from 'react';
import { Link } from 'react-router';
import { LoginLink } from 'react-stormpath';
import DocumentTitle from 'react-document-title';

import Header from './Header';

export default class is extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return (
      
        
          
          { this.props.children }
        
      
    );
  }
}

As you can see, we don’t have a Header component yet, so let’s go and create a new file named Header.js in the same directory with the following content:

import React from 'react';
import { Link } from 'react-router';
import { LoginLink, LogoutLink, Authenticated, NotAuthenticated } from 'react-stormpath';

export default class Header extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return (
      
        
          
            * Home

            
            
          
        
      
    );
  }
}

Index Page

In our MasterPage notice the property this.props.children. This will contain the components of the child routes that our router match. So if we had a route that looked like:


  

And we tried to access /hello. The this.props.children array would be populated with a HelloPage component and for that reason that component would be rendered in our master page.

Now imagine the scenario where you try to access /. Without any this.props.children, this would only render your master page but with empty content. This is where [IndexRoute](https://github.com/rackt/react-router/blob/master/docs/guides/basics/IndexRoutes.md) comes into play. With an [IndexRoute](https://github.com/rackt/react-router/blob/master/docs/guides/basics/IndexRoutes.md) you can specify the component that should be rendered when you hit the path of the master page route (in our case /).

But before we add our [IndexRoute](https://github.com/rackt/react-router/blob/master/docs/guides/basics/IndexRoutes.md) to our router, let’s create a new file in our pages directory named IndexPage.js and add the following to it:

import { Link } from 'react-router';
import React, { PropTypes } from 'react';
import { LoginLink } from 'react-stormpath';

export default class IndexPage extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return (
      
        ## Welcome!

        
* * *

        
          
            **To my React application!**
          
          
Ready to begin? Try these Stormpath features that are included in this example:

          1. Registration
1. 
1. Custom Profile Data

        
      
    );
  }
}

Now let’s add our [IndexRoute](https://github.com/rackt/react-router/blob/master/docs/guides/basics/IndexRoutes.md). Open up app.js and inside the tag `` add your [IndexRoute](https://github.com/rackt/react-router/blob/master/docs/guides/basics/IndexRoutes.md) so that it looks like the following:


  

Login Page

We now have an application that shows a header with a default page. But we don’t have any place to login yet. So let’s create a new file named LoginPage.js and add some content to it:

import React from 'react';
import DocumentTitle from 'react-document-title';
import { LoginForm } from 'react-stormpath';

export default class LoginPage extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return (
      
        
          
            
              ### Login

              
* * *

            
          
          
        
      
    );
  }
}

Notice the [LoginForm](https://github.com/stormpath/stormpath-sdk-react/blob/master/docs/api.md#loginform) component. This is all we have to add in order for us to have a fully working form in which people can sign up from.

But before we can use it, we need to open up app.js and add a route for the page in our router. So inside the tag `` add the following:

<LoginRoute path='/login' component={LoginPage} />

In order to be able to access the login page, we need to add this to our menu. So go ahead and open up Header.js and inside the element `` add the following:* As you can see we’re using the [NotAuthenticated](https://github.com/stormpath/stormpath-sdk-react/blob/master/docs/api.md#notauthenticated) component. With this we’ll only show a [LoginLink](https://github.com/stormpath/stormpath-sdk-react/blob/master/docs/api.md#loginlink) when the user isn’t logged in yet.## Registration PageHow to build a React App from scratchNow, let’s add a page where people can sign up. We’ll call it RegistrationPage. So create a new file named RegistrationPage.js and put the following content in it:``` import React from ‘react’; import DocumentTitle from ‘react-document-title’; import { RegistrationForm } from ‘react-stormpath’;export default class RegistrationPage extends React.Component {render() {return (### Registration


);} } Notice that we used the `[RegistrationForm](https://github.com/stormpath/stormpath-sdk-react/blob/master/docs/api.md#registrationform)` component. As you might have guessed, this will render a Stormpath registration form. And once you've signed up it will point users to the login page where they'll be able to login.In order to access this page. We need to add a route. So go ahead and open up `app.js` and inside the tag `` add: ```We now have a route, but people won’t be able to find the page unless we link to it, so open up Header.js and add the following right before the closing tag () of :


  
    Create Account
  

Notice the use of the [NotAuthenticated](https://github.com/stormpath/stormpath-sdk-react/blob/master/docs/api.md#notauthenticated) component. With this we’ll only show the /register link when the user isn’t logged in.

Profile Page

How to build a React App from scratch

Once a user is logged in, we want to be able to show them some personalized content (their user data). So create a new file named ProfilePage.js and put the following code in it:

import React from 'react';
import DocumentTitle from 'react-document-title';
import { UserProfileForm } from 'react-stormpath';

export default class ProfilePage extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return (
      
      
          
            
              ### My Profile

              
* * *

            
          
          
            
              
            
          
        
      
    );
  }
}

Notice that we use the [UserProfileForm](https://github.com/stormpath/stormpath-sdk-react/blob/master/docs/api.md#userprofileform). This is a simple helper form that allows you to edit the most basic user fields.

Though, in order to actually modify the user profile, we need to change a few things in our server. So open up server.js, add var bodyParser = require('body-parser'); to the top of the file and then add the following route underneath app.use(stormpath.init(app, ...));:

app.post('/me', bodyParser.json(), stormpath.loginRequired, function (req, res) {
  function writeError(message) {
    res.status(400);
    res.json({ message: message, status: 400 });
    res.end();
  }

  function saveAccount () {
    req.user.givenName = req.body.givenName;
    req.user.surname = req.body.surname;
    req.user.email = req.body.email;

    req.user.save(function (err) {
      if (err) {
        return writeError(err.userMessage || err.message);
      }
      res.end();
    });
  }

  if (req.body.password) {
    var application = req.app.get('stormpathApplication');

    application.authenticateAccount({
      username: req.user.username,
      password: req.body.existingPassword
    }, function (err) {
      if (err) {
        return writeError('The existing password that you entered was incorrect.');
      }

      req.user.password = req.body.password;

      saveAccount();
    });
  } else {
    saveAccount();
  }
});

This will allow the form to change both the given name, surname, email and password of user. If you have additional fields that you wish to edit, then simply customize the [UserProfileForm](https://github.com/stormpath/stormpath-sdk-react/blob/master/docs/api.md#userprofileform) form and add the fields that you wish to edit in the route above.

Now, in order for us to access this page from the menu, open up Header.js and right below Home add:


  
    Profile
  

With this, using the [Authenticated](https://github.com/stormpath/stormpath-sdk-react/blob/master/docs/api.md#authenticated)"(https://github.com/stormpath/stormpath-sdk-react/blob/master/docs/api.md#authenticated) component, when we have a user session we’ll render a link to the /profile page and allow our users to view their user profile.

In order for us to be able to access the page, we must as with the other pages add it to the router. Open up app.js and inside the tag `` add:


Notice that we’re using [AuthenticatedRoute](https://github.com/stormpath/stormpath-sdk-react/blob/master/docs/api.md#authenticatedroute). This is a route that can only be accessed if there is an authenticated user session. If there’s no session, then the user will automatically be redirected to the path of the [LoginLink](https://github.com/stormpath/stormpath-sdk-react/blob/master/docs/api.md#loginlink).

Home Route

How to build a React App from scratch

Now when we’ve setup most of our routing. Let’s look at a special route called the [HomeRoute](https://github.com/stormpath/stormpath-sdk-react/blob/master/docs/api.md#homeroute). This route itself doesn’t do anything. But acts as a “marker”, to indicate where to redirect to when logging in and logging out.

So in order to specify where we want to end up when we log out, open up app.js and change the:


  ...

Into:


  ...

Now when logging out, the Stormpath SDK will know that it should redirect to the ‘/’ path. Now, to specify where to redirect when logging out, change the [AuthenticatedRoute](https://github.com/stormpath/stormpath-sdk-react/blob/master/docs/api.md#authenticatedroute) that we created in the previous step:

<AuthenticatedRoute path='/profile' component={ProfilePage} />

So that it looks like:


  

Notice how the [AuthenticatedRoute](https://github.com/stormpath/stormpath-sdk-react/blob/master/docs/api.md#authenticatedroute) wraps the [HomeRoute](https://github.com/stormpath/stormpath-sdk-react/blob/master/docs/api.md#homeroute). This is used to indicate the authenticated route that we want to redirect to after login.

Logout

Finally, once our users have signed up and logged in. We want to give them the option to logout. Fortunately, adding this is really simple.

So open up Header.js and inside `` add this code to the end:


  
    
  

Notice the [LogoutLink](https://github.com/stormpath/stormpath-sdk-react/blob/master/docs/api.md#logoutlink) component. Once this is clicked, the user session will be automatically destroyed and the user will be redirected to the unauthenticated [HomeRoute](https://github.com/stormpath/stormpath-sdk-react/blob/master/docs/api.md#homeroute).

User State in Components

How to build a React App from scratch

Access user state in your components by requesting the authenticated and user context types:

class ContextExample extends React.Component {
  static contextTypes = {
    authenticated: React.PropTypes.bool,
    user: React.PropTypes.object
  };

  render() {
    if (!this.context.authenticated) {
      return (
        
          You need to .
        
      );
    }

    return (
      
        Welcome {this.context.user.username}!
      
    );
  }
}

Import Components

To be able to reference our pages we need to import them. And in order to make importing easy, we’ll put them all together in an index.js file so we only have to import it once. So let’s create a new file named index.js in our pages directory and export all of our pages from it, as shown below:

export MasterPage from './MasterPage'
export IndexPage from './IndexPage'
export LoginPage from './LoginPage'
export RegistrationPage from './RegistrationPage'
export ProfilePage from './ProfilePage'

With this, we’ll only have to do one import in order to have access to all of our pages.

So let’s do that. Open up app.js file and at the top of the file, add the following import statement:

import { MasterPage, IndexPage, LoginPage, RegistrationPage, ProfilePage } from './pages';

Run The Project

Now we have an application where our users can sign up, login, and show their user data. So let’s try it out!

As before, start our server by running the following:

$ node server.js

And if everything is running successfully you should be able to see this message:

Listening at http://localhost:3000

So, open up http://localhost:3000 in your browser and try it out!

Wrapping Up

As you have seen in this tutorial, React is a really powerful tool and when used together with ES6, JSX and Stormpath, building apps suddenly becomes fun again.

If you have questions regarding the Stormpath React SDK, be sure to check out its API documentation.

#reactjs #javascript

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How native is React Native? | React Native vs Native App Development

If you are undertaking a mobile app development for your start-up or enterprise, you are likely wondering whether to use React Native. As a popular development framework, React Native helps you to develop near-native mobile apps. However, you are probably also wondering how close you can get to a native app by using React Native. How native is React Native?

In the article, we discuss the similarities between native mobile development and development using React Native. We also touch upon where they differ and how to bridge the gaps. Read on.

A brief introduction to React Native

Let’s briefly set the context first. We will briefly touch upon what React Native is and how it differs from earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is a popular JavaScript framework that Facebook has created. You can use this open-source framework to code natively rendering Android and iOS mobile apps. You can use it to develop web apps too.

Facebook has developed React Native based on React, its JavaScript library. The first release of React Native came in March 2015. At the time of writing this article, the latest stable release of React Native is 0.62.0, and it was released in March 2020.

Although relatively new, React Native has acquired a high degree of popularity. The “Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2019” report identifies it as the 8th most loved framework. Facebook, Walmart, and Bloomberg are some of the top companies that use React Native.

The popularity of React Native comes from its advantages. Some of its advantages are as follows:

  • Performance: It delivers optimal performance.
  • Cross-platform development: You can develop both Android and iOS apps with it. The reuse of code expedites development and reduces costs.
  • UI design: React Native enables you to design simple and responsive UI for your mobile app.
  • 3rd party plugins: This framework supports 3rd party plugins.
  • Developer community: A vibrant community of developers support React Native.

Why React Native is fundamentally different from earlier hybrid frameworks

Are you wondering whether React Native is just another of those hybrid frameworks like Ionic or Cordova? It’s not! React Native is fundamentally different from these earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is very close to native. Consider the following aspects as described on the React Native website:

  • Access to many native platforms features: The primitives of React Native render to native platform UI. This means that your React Native app will use many native platform APIs as native apps would do.
  • Near-native user experience: React Native provides several native components, and these are platform agnostic.
  • The ease of accessing native APIs: React Native uses a declarative UI paradigm. This enables React Native to interact easily with native platform APIs since React Native wraps existing native code.

Due to these factors, React Native offers many more advantages compared to those earlier hybrid frameworks. We now review them.

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List of Top-Rated React Native Mobile App Development Companies in USA:

  1. AppClues Infotech
  2. WebClues Infotech
  3. AppClues Studio
  4. WebClues Global
  5. Data EximIT
  6. Apptunix
  7. BHW Group
  8. Willow Tree:
  9. MindGrub
  10. Prismetric

A Brief about the company details mentioned below:

1. AppClues Infotech
As a React Native Mobile App Development Company in USA, AppClues Infotech offers user-centered mobile app development for iOS & Android. Since their founding in 2014, their React Native developers create beautiful mobile apps.

They have a robust react native app development team that has high knowledge and excellent strength of developing any type of mobile app. They have successfully delivered 450+ mobile apps as per client requirements and functionalities.
Website: https://www.appcluesinfotech.com/

2. WebClues Infotech
WebClues Infotech is the Top-Notch React Native mobile app development company in USA & offering exceptional service worldwide. Since their founding in 2014, they have completed 950+ web & mobile apps projects on time.

They have the best team of developers who has an excellent knowledge of developing the most secure, robust & Powerful React Native Mobile Apps. From start-ups to enterprise organizations, WebClues Infotech provides top-notch React Native App solutions that meet the needs of their clients.
Website: https://www.webcluesinfotech.com/

3. AppClues Studio
AppClues Studio is one of the top React Native mobile app development company in USA and offers the best service worldwide at an affordable price. They have a robust & comprehensive team of React Native App developers who has high strength & extensive knowledge of developing any type of mobile apps.
Website: https://www.appcluesstudio.com/

4. WebClues Global
WebClues Global is one of the best React Native Mobile App Development Company in USA. They provide low-cost & fast React Native Development Services and their React Native App Developers have a high capability of serving projects on more than one platform.

Since their founding in 2014, they have successfully delivered 721+ mobile app projects accurately. They offer versatile React Native App development technology solutions to their clients at an affordable price.
Website: https://www.webcluesglobal.com/

5. Data EximIT
Hire expert React Native app developer from top React Native app development company in USA. Data EximIT is providing high-quality and innovative React Native application development services and support for your next projects. The company has been in the market for more than 8 years and has already gained the trust of 553+ clients and completed 1250+ projects around the globe.

They have a large pool of React Native App developers who can create scalable, full-fledged, and appealing mobile apps to meet the highest industry standards.
Website: https://www.dataeximit.com/

6. Apptunix
Apptunix is the best React Native App Development Company in the USA. It was established in 2013 and vast experience in developing React Native apps. After developing various successful React Native Mobile Apps, the company believes that this technology helps them incorporate advanced features in mobile apps without influencing the user experience.
Website: https://www.apptunix.com/

7. BHW Group
BHW Group is a Top-Notch React Native Mobile App Development Company in the USA. The company has 13+ years of experience in providing qualitative app development services to clients worldwide. They have a compressive pool of React Native App developers who can create scalable, full-fledged, and creative mobile apps to meet the highest industry standards.
Website: https://thebhwgroup.com/

8. Willow Tree:
Willow Tree is the Top-Notch React Native Mobile App Development Company in the USA & offering exceptional React Native service. They have the best team of developers who has an excellent knowledge of developing the most secure, robust & Powerful React Native Mobile Apps. From start-ups to enterprise organizations, Willow Tree has top-notch React Native App solutions that meet the needs of their clients.
Website: https://willowtreeapps.com/

9. MindGrub
MindGrub is a leading React Native Mobile App Development Company in the USA. Along with React Native, the company also works on other emerging technologies like robotics, augmented & virtual reality. The Company has excellent strength and the best developers team for any type of React Native mobile apps. They offer versatile React Native App development technology solutions to their clients.
Website: https://www.mindgrub.com/

10. Prismetric
Prismetric is the premium React Native Mobile App Development Company in the USA. They provide fast React Native Development Services and their React Native App Developers have a high capability of serving projects on various platforms. They focus on developing customized solutions for specific business requirements. Being a popular name in the React Native development market, Prismetric has accumulated a specialty in offering these services.
Website: https://www.prismetric.com/

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Fredy  Larson

Fredy Larson

1595059664

How long does it take to develop/build an app?

With more of us using smartphones, the popularity of mobile applications has exploded. In the digital era, the number of people looking for products and services online is growing rapidly. Smartphone owners look for mobile applications that give them quick access to companies’ products and services. As a result, mobile apps provide customers with a lot of benefits in just one device.

Likewise, companies use mobile apps to increase customer loyalty and improve their services. Mobile Developers are in high demand as companies use apps not only to create brand awareness but also to gather information. For that reason, mobile apps are used as tools to collect valuable data from customers to help companies improve their offer.

There are many types of mobile applications, each with its own advantages. For example, native apps perform better, while web apps don’t need to be customized for the platform or operating system (OS). Likewise, hybrid apps provide users with comfortable user experience. However, you may be wondering how long it takes to develop an app.

To give you an idea of how long the app development process takes, here’s a short guide.

App Idea & Research

app-idea-research

_Average time spent: two to five weeks _

This is the initial stage and a crucial step in setting the project in the right direction. In this stage, you brainstorm ideas and select the best one. Apart from that, you’ll need to do some research to see if your idea is viable. Remember that coming up with an idea is easy; the hard part is to make it a reality.

All your ideas may seem viable, but you still have to run some tests to keep it as real as possible. For that reason, when Web Developers are building a web app, they analyze the available ideas to see which one is the best match for the targeted audience.

Targeting the right audience is crucial when you are developing an app. It saves time when shaping the app in the right direction as you have a clear set of objectives. Likewise, analyzing how the app affects the market is essential. During the research process, App Developers must gather information about potential competitors and threats. This helps the app owners develop strategies to tackle difficulties that come up after the launch.

The research process can take several weeks, but it determines how successful your app can be. For that reason, you must take your time to know all the weaknesses and strengths of the competitors, possible app strategies, and targeted audience.

The outcomes of this stage are app prototypes and the minimum feasible product.

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Juned Ghanchi

1621573085

React Native App Developers India, React Native App Development Company

Expand your user base by using react-native apps developed by our expert team for various platforms like Android, Android TV, iOS, macOS, tvOS, the Web, Windows, and UWP.

We help businesses to scale up the process and achieve greater performance by providing the best react native app development services. Our skilled and experienced team’s apps have delivered all the expected results for our clients across the world.

To achieve growth for your business, hire react native app developers in India. You can count on us for all the technical services and support.

#react native app development company india #react native app developers india #hire react native developers india #react native app development company #react native app developers #hire react native developers

Carmen  Grimes

Carmen Grimes

1595494844

How to start an electric scooter facility/fleet in a university campus/IT park

Are you leading an organization that has a large campus, e.g., a large university? You are probably thinking of introducing an electric scooter/bicycle fleet on the campus, and why wouldn’t you?

Introducing micro-mobility in your campus with the help of such a fleet would help the people on the campus significantly. People would save money since they don’t need to use a car for a short distance. Your campus will see a drastic reduction in congestion, moreover, its carbon footprint will reduce.

Micro-mobility is relatively new though and you would need help. You would need to select an appropriate fleet of vehicles. The people on your campus would need to find electric scooters or electric bikes for commuting, and you need to provide a solution for this.

To be more specific, you need a short-term electric bike rental app. With such an app, you will be able to easily offer micro-mobility to the people on the campus. We at Devathon have built Autorent exactly for this.

What does Autorent do and how can it help you? How does it enable you to introduce micro-mobility on your campus? We explain these in this article, however, we will touch upon a few basics first.

Micro-mobility: What it is

micro-mobility

You are probably thinking about micro-mobility relatively recently, aren’t you? A few relevant insights about it could help you to better appreciate its importance.

Micro-mobility is a new trend in transportation, and it uses vehicles that are considerably smaller than cars. Electric scooters (e-scooters) and electric bikes (e-bikes) are the most popular forms of micro-mobility, however, there are also e-unicycles and e-skateboards.

You might have already seen e-scooters, which are kick scooters that come with a motor. Thanks to its motor, an e-scooter can achieve a speed of up to 20 km/h. On the other hand, e-bikes are popular in China and Japan, and they come with a motor, and you can reach a speed of 40 km/h.

You obviously can’t use these vehicles for very long commutes, however, what if you need to travel a short distance? Even if you have a reasonable public transport facility in the city, it might not cover the route you need to take. Take the example of a large university campus. Such a campus is often at a considerable distance from the central business district of the city where it’s located. While public transport facilities may serve the central business district, they wouldn’t serve this large campus. Currently, many people drive their cars even for short distances.

As you know, that brings its own set of challenges. Vehicular traffic adds significantly to pollution, moreover, finding a parking spot can be hard in crowded urban districts.

Well, you can reduce your carbon footprint if you use an electric car. However, electric cars are still new, and many countries are still building the necessary infrastructure for them. Your large campus might not have the necessary infrastructure for them either. Presently, electric cars don’t represent a viable option in most geographies.

As a result, you need to buy and maintain a car even if your commute is short. In addition to dealing with parking problems, you need to spend significantly on your car.

All of these factors have combined to make people sit up and think seriously about cars. Many people are now seriously considering whether a car is really the best option even if they have to commute only a short distance.

This is where micro-mobility enters the picture. When you commute a short distance regularly, e-scooters or e-bikes are viable options. You limit your carbon footprints and you cut costs!

Businesses have seen this shift in thinking, and e-scooter companies like Lime and Bird have entered this field in a big way. They let you rent e-scooters by the minute. On the other hand, start-ups like Jump and Lyft have entered the e-bike market.

Think of your campus now! The people there might need to travel short distances within the campus, and e-scooters can really help them.

How micro-mobility can benefit you

benefits-micromobility

What advantages can you get from micro-mobility? Let’s take a deeper look into this question.

Micro-mobility can offer several advantages to the people on your campus, e.g.:

  • Affordability: Shared e-scooters are cheaper than other mass transportation options. Remember that the people on your campus will use them on a shared basis, and they will pay for their short commutes only. Well, depending on your operating model, you might even let them use shared e-scooters or e-bikes for free!
  • Convenience: Users don’t need to worry about finding parking spots for shared e-scooters since these are small. They can easily travel from point A to point B on your campus with the help of these e-scooters.
  • Environmentally sustainable: Shared e-scooters reduce the carbon footprint, moreover, they decongest the roads. Statistics from the pilot programs in cities like Portland and Denver showimpressive gains around this key aspect.
  • Safety: This one’s obvious, isn’t it? When people on your campus use small e-scooters or e-bikes instead of cars, the problem of overspeeding will disappear. you will see fewer accidents.

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