Review of Container-to-Container Communications in Kubernetes

Review of Container-to-Container Communications in Kubernetes

Kubernetes is a containerized solution. It provides virtualized runtime environments called Pods, which house one or more containers to provide a virtual runtime environment. ... To manage such communications, Kubernetes offers the following four networking models: Container-to-Container communications.

Kubernetes is a containerized solution. It provides virtualized runtime environments called Pods, which house one or more containers to provide a virtual runtime environment. An important aspect of Kubernetes is container communication within the Pod. Additionally, an important area of managing the Kubernetes network is to forward container ports internally and externally to make sure containers within a Pod communicate with one another properly. To manage such communications, Kubernetes offers the following four networking models:

  • Container-to-Container communications
  • Pod-to-Pod communications
  • Pod-to-Service communications
  • External-to-Internal communications

In this article, we dive into Container-to-Container communications, by showing you ways in which containers within a pod can network and communicate.

Communication Between Containers in a Pod

Having multiple containers in a single Pod makes it relatively straightforward for them to communicate with each other. They can do this using several different methods. In this article, we discuss two methods: i- Shared Volumes and ii-Inter-Process Communications in more detail.

I- Shared Volumes in a Kubernetes Pod

In Kubernetes, you can use a shared Kubernetes Volume as a simple and efficient way to share data between containers in a Pod. For most cases, it is sufficient to use a directory on the host that is shared with all containers within a Pod.

Kubernetes Volumes enables data to survive container restarts, but these volumes have the same lifetime as the Pod. This means that the volume (and the data it holds) exists exactly as long as that Pod exists. If that Pod is deleted for any reason, even if an identical replacement is created, the shared Volume is also destroyed and created from scratch.

A standard use case for a multicontainer Pod with a shared Volume is when one container writes logs or other files to the shared directory, and the other container reads from the shared directory. For example, we can create a Pod like so:

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