Eugene  Lockman

Eugene Lockman

1620629100

Overview of Incident Lifecycle in SRE

As the saying goes, “Every problem we face is a blessing in disguise.” Along similar lines, every incident in system infrastructure helps product development & engineering teams understand better about the capabilities of system architecture. This can further help organizations in building a sustainable and reliable product.

In this blog, let’s quantify all complexities of handling an incident in a well-structured format with an intent to help handle every incident effectively.

What Is an Incident?

ITIL 2011 defines Incident as:

“An unplanned interruption to an IT service or reduction in the quality of an IT service or a failure of a Configuration Item that has not yet impacted an IT service [but has potential to do so]”

Clearly, in order to maintain acceptable service levels, it is important to resolve incidents and restore normal services as quickly as possible.

What Is the Lifecycle of an Incident?

ITIL defines a standard lifecycle of an incident. While the actual activities that occur during each phase have changed over time, it is still a good starting point for a detailed description of incidents.

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Overview of Incident Lifecycle in SRE

How to Build an Effective and Sustainable On-Call Schedule For Your Team

A lot of tech companies struggle with creating an effective and efficient on-call schedule internally for their product and service, which results in longer downtimes when something goes wrong. They often over-burden their team members with repeated on-call duty, resulting in team fatigue. Here’s how to create an on-call schedule that your team might just love.

On-call doesn’t have to suck the life out of your employees. There’s another side to it. A better one.

An on-call schedule ensures that someone competent is available to bring services up and running if they go down so that the customers don’t have trouble using your product or service. Though on-call isn’t a new concept in the world of DevOps and IT Ops, the execution and roles have greatly evolved over the years.

How Has On-Call Evolved Over the Years?

In the past, being on-call and resolving issues as they occur used to be the sole responsibility of Sysadmins and Operation Engineers. With the evolution of DevOps, Software Developers now find themselves part of an on-call rotation and this has worked well for most companies.

On-call schedules used to be created on spreadsheets (some still use this method) and intimated to the team without looking into their specific availability. The person on-call had to be available at that time or day. It lacked flexibility, it was a nightmare to find a replacement if the person on-call had an emergency and it was a hassle to find someone who could help resolve an issue if the person on-call wasn’t able to resolve it on their own.

Thanks to ops platforms like Fyipe which has an inbuilt, on-call scheduling feature, we don’t have to worry about creating schedules in spreadsheets anymore or informing the person on-call.

What still remains an issue, however, is the negative attitude towards being on-call. No-one wanted to be on-call then and no-one wants it now but it’s an absolute necessity.

Being on-call doesn’t have to suck! An effective on-call schedule can help reduce friction and help keep your engineers happy. Happy on-call team means happy customers!

The only way this is possible without draining your team is to ensure the schedule takes care of their work-life balance and doesn’t deplete any single engineer completely.

Why Do You Need to Have Someone On-Call?

Being on-call is the first step an organization takes towards improving its availability and reliability for its customers or users. On-call engineers are the last line of defense to defend against customer-impacting outages and ensure that the issues are resolved as quickly as possible. You need to be there when your customers need you. On-call ensures this.

“If the idea of being ‘on-call’ sucks to your team, it means they are responding negatively to a symptom.

The cause is less systemic and more a reflection of the team/organization’s basic engineering prowess.

An organization should have a “No Downtime” engineering and ops process in place. Having an on-call schedule for your team is an emergency last line of defense against downtimes.

#devops #devops-tools #sre #incident-management #incident-responsiveness #incident-response-plan #incident #on-call

Humberto  Ratke

Humberto Ratke

1589644080

What is DevOps Lifecycle? | How to manage yours

From conceptualization to deployment, the process of developing software applications or web applications is complex. By going through several intricate phases of development, a web application or software is tested on multiple levels before being proceeded into production.

In most cases, software application development becomes time-consuming due to its specifications and complexities. In order to deliver the application in a short span of time, software developers are following a universal set of practices called the DevOps lifecycle.

So, what is DevOps in the world of software application development? Let’s deep dive into its meaning, uses, as well as each critical phase in the DevOps lifecycle.

#devops #devops tutorial #devops lifecycle tools #devops lifecycle blocks #devops lifecycle phases #lifecycle of devops

5 Basic Differences Between DevOps and SRE You Should Know About

The world of Information Technology and software development often conflates DevOps with SRE to mean one and the same thing. However, there are vast differences between the two. While Site Reliability Engineering (SRE) has gained traction in recent years, DevOps has been around much longer (even before the term DevOps existed).

To put it simply, DevOps and SRE are both practices put in place to deliver software faster. The only difference between the two is in their approaches; DevOps is focused on reducing the software development lifecycle, and SRE concentrates on eliminating system weaknesses to achieve the same purpose.

In this article, we will look at the fundamental ways in which DevOps and SRE differ from each other. Before we do that, let’s start with understanding what DevOps and SRE are.

#devops #devops and sre #devops vs sre #sre

Marlee  Carter

Marlee Carter

1620199243

5 Basic Differences Between DevOps and SRE You Should Know About

The world of Information Technology and software development often conflates DevOps with SRE to mean one and the same thing. However, there are vast differences between the two. While Site Reliability Engineering (SRE) has gained traction in recent years, DevOps has been around much longer (even before the term DevOps existed).

To put it simply, DevOps and SRE are both practices put in place to deliver software faster. The only difference between the two is in their approaches; DevOps is focused on reducing the software development lifecycle, and SRE concentrates on eliminating system weaknesses to achieve the same purpose.

In this article, we will look at the fundamental ways in which DevOps and SRE differ from each other. Before we do that, let’s start with understanding what DevOps and SRE are.

#software development #devops #devops and sre #devops vs sre #sre

Marlee  Carter

Marlee Carter

1620220740

DevOps Lifecycle: Different Phases of DevOps Lifecycle Explained

DevOps is training that permits a solitary group to deal with the whole application development life cycle: development, testing, deployment, and activities. It comprises different stages, for example, continuous development, continuous integration, continuous testing, continuous deployment, and continuous monitoring.

DevOps Lifecycle

DevOps characterizes an agile connection between operations and development. It is a cycle polished by the development group and operational specialists together from the starting to the last phase of the item. Learning DevOps isn’t finished without understanding the DevOps lifecycle stages.

#devops #devops lifecycle #lifecycle