Quic-go: A QUIC Implementation in Pure Go

A QUIC implementation in pure Go

quic-go is an implementation of the QUIC protocol, RFC 9000 protocol in Go. In addition to RFC 9000, it currently implements the IETF QUIC draft-29. Support for draft-29 will eventually be dropped, as it is phased out of the ecosystem.

Guides

We currently support Go 1.16.x, Go 1.17.x, and Go 1.18.x.

Running tests:

go test ./...

QUIC without HTTP/3

Take a look at this echo example.

Usage

As a server

See the example server. Starting a QUIC server is very similar to the standard lib http in go:

http.Handle("/", http.FileServer(http.Dir(wwwDir)))
http3.ListenAndServeQUIC("localhost:4242", "/path/to/cert/chain.pem", "/path/to/privkey.pem", nil)

As a client

See the example client. Use a http3.RoundTripper as a Transport in a http.Client.

http.Client{
  Transport: &http3.RoundTripper{},
}

Projects using quic-go

ProjectDescriptionStars
algernonSmall self-contained pure-Go web server with Lua, Markdown, HTTP/2, QUIC, Redis and PostgreSQL supportGitHub Repo stars
caddyFast, multi-platform web server with automatic HTTPSGitHub Repo stars
go-ipfsIPFS implementation in goGitHub Repo stars
syncthingOpen Source Continuous File SynchronizationGitHub Repo stars
traefikThe Cloud Native Application ProxyGitHub Repo stars
v2ray-coreA platform for building proxies to bypass network restrictionsGitHub Repo stars
cloudflaredA tunneling daemon that proxies traffic from the Cloudflare network to your originsGitHub Repo stars
OONI ProbeThe Open Observatory of Network Interference (OONI) aims to empower decentralized efforts in documenting Internet censorship around the world.GitHub Repo stars

Contributing

We are always happy to welcome new contributors! We have a number of self-contained issues that are suitable for first-time contributors, they are tagged with help wanted. If you have any questions, please feel free to reach out by opening an issue or leaving a comment.

Author: lucas-clemente
Source Code: https://github.com/lucas-clemente/quic-go 
License: MIT License

#go #golang 

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Quic-go: A QUIC Implementation in Pure Go
Fannie  Zemlak

Fannie Zemlak

1599854400

What's new in the go 1.15

Go announced Go 1.15 version on 11 Aug 2020. Highlighted updates and features include Substantial improvements to the Go linker, Improved allocation for small objects at high core counts, X.509 CommonName deprecation, GOPROXY supports skipping proxies that return errors, New embedded tzdata package, Several Core Library improvements and more.

As Go promise for maintaining backward compatibility. After upgrading to the latest Go 1.15 version, almost all existing Golang applications or programs continue to compile and run as older Golang version.

#go #golang #go 1.15 #go features #go improvement #go package #go new features

Quic-go: A QUIC Implementation in Pure Go

A QUIC implementation in pure Go

quic-go is an implementation of the QUIC protocol, RFC 9000 protocol in Go. In addition to RFC 9000, it currently implements the IETF QUIC draft-29. Support for draft-29 will eventually be dropped, as it is phased out of the ecosystem.

Guides

We currently support Go 1.16.x, Go 1.17.x, and Go 1.18.x.

Running tests:

go test ./...

QUIC without HTTP/3

Take a look at this echo example.

Usage

As a server

See the example server. Starting a QUIC server is very similar to the standard lib http in go:

http.Handle("/", http.FileServer(http.Dir(wwwDir)))
http3.ListenAndServeQUIC("localhost:4242", "/path/to/cert/chain.pem", "/path/to/privkey.pem", nil)

As a client

See the example client. Use a http3.RoundTripper as a Transport in a http.Client.

http.Client{
  Transport: &http3.RoundTripper{},
}

Projects using quic-go

ProjectDescriptionStars
algernonSmall self-contained pure-Go web server with Lua, Markdown, HTTP/2, QUIC, Redis and PostgreSQL supportGitHub Repo stars
caddyFast, multi-platform web server with automatic HTTPSGitHub Repo stars
go-ipfsIPFS implementation in goGitHub Repo stars
syncthingOpen Source Continuous File SynchronizationGitHub Repo stars
traefikThe Cloud Native Application ProxyGitHub Repo stars
v2ray-coreA platform for building proxies to bypass network restrictionsGitHub Repo stars
cloudflaredA tunneling daemon that proxies traffic from the Cloudflare network to your originsGitHub Repo stars
OONI ProbeThe Open Observatory of Network Interference (OONI) aims to empower decentralized efforts in documenting Internet censorship around the world.GitHub Repo stars

Contributing

We are always happy to welcome new contributors! We have a number of self-contained issues that are suitable for first-time contributors, they are tagged with help wanted. If you have any questions, please feel free to reach out by opening an issue or leaving a comment.

Author: lucas-clemente
Source Code: https://github.com/lucas-clemente/quic-go 
License: MIT License

#go #golang 

Termbox-go: Pure Go Termbox Implementation

IMPORTANT

This library is somewhat not maintained anymore. But I'm glad that it did what I wanted the most. It moved people away from "ncurses" mindset and these days we see both re-implementations of termbox API in various languages and even possibly better libs with similar API design. If you're looking for a Go lib that provides terminal-based user interface facilities, I've heard that gdamore/tcell is good (never used it myself). Also for more complicated interfaces and/or computer games I recommend you to consider using HTML-based UI. Having said that, termbox still somewhat works. In fact I'm writing this line of text right now in godit (which is a text editor written using termbox-go). So, be aware. Good luck and have a nice day.

Termbox

Termbox is a library that provides a minimalistic API which allows the programmer to write text-based user interfaces. The library is crossplatform and has both terminal-based implementations on *nix operating systems and a winapi console based implementation for windows operating systems. The basic idea is an abstraction of the greatest common subset of features available on all major terminals and other terminal-like APIs in a minimalistic fashion. Small API means it is easy to implement, test, maintain and learn it, that's what makes the termbox a distinct library in its area.

Installation

Install and update this go package with go get -u github.com/nsf/termbox-go

Examples

For examples of what can be done take a look at various examples in the _demos directory. You can try them with go run: go run _demos/keyboard.go

There are also some interesting projects using termbox-go:

  • godit is an emacsish lightweight text editor written using termbox.
  • gotetris is an implementation of Tetris.
  • sokoban-go is an implementation of sokoban game.
  • hecate is a hex editor designed by Satan.
  • httopd is top for httpd logs.
  • mop is stock market tracker for hackers.
  • termui is a terminal dashboard.
  • termloop is a terminal game engine.
  • xterm-color-chart is a XTerm 256 color chart.
  • gocui is a minimalist Go library aimed at creating console user interfaces.
  • dry is an interactive cli to manage Docker containers.
  • pxl displays images in the terminal.
  • snake-game is an implementation of the Snake game.
  • gone is a CLI pomodoro® timer.
  • Spoof.go controllable movement spoofing from the cli.
  • rat lets you compose shell commands to build terminal applications.
  • httplab An interactive web server.
  • wot Wait time during command is completed.
  • 2048-go is 2048 in Go.
  • jv helps you view JSON on the command-line.
  • pinger helps you to monitor numerous hosts using ICMP ECHO_REQUEST.
  • vixl44 lets you create pixel art inside your terminal using vim movements.
  • zterm is a typing game inspired by http://zty.pe/.
  • gotypist is a fun touch-typing tutor following Steve Yegge's method.
  • cointop is an interactive terminal based UI application for tracking cryptocurrencies.
  • pexpo is a terminal sending ping tool written in Go.
  • jid is an interactive JSON drill down tool using filtering queries like jq.
  • nonograminGo is a nonogram (aka. picross) in Go.
  • tower-of-go is a tiny maze game that runs on the terminal.

Author: Nsf
Source Code: https://github.com/nsf/termbox-go 
License: MIT License

#go #golang 

Go-git: A Highly Extensible Git Implementation in Pure Go

go-git is a highly extensible git implementation library written in pure Go.

It can be used to manipulate git repositories at low level (plumbing) or high level (porcelain), through an idiomatic Go API. It also supports several types of storage, such as in-memory filesystems, or custom implementations, thanks to the Storer interface.

It's being actively developed since 2015 and is being used extensively by Keybase, Gitea or Pulumi, and by many other libraries and tools.

Project Status

After the legal issues with the src-d organization, the lack of update for four months and the requirement to make a hard fork, the project is now back to normality.

The project is currently actively maintained by individual contributors, including several of the original authors, but also backed by a new company, gitsight, where go-git is a critical component used at scale.

Comparison with git

go-git aims to be fully compatible with git, all the porcelain operations are implemented to work exactly as git does.

git is a humongous project with years of development by thousands of contributors, making it challenging for go-git to implement all the features. You can find a comparison of go-git vs git in the compatibility documentation.

Installation

The recommended way to install go-git is:

import "github.com/go-git/go-git/v5" // with go modules enabled (GO111MODULE=on or outside GOPATH)
import "github.com/go-git/go-git" // with go modules disabled

Examples

Please note that the CheckIfError and Info functions used in the examples are from the examples package just to be used in the examples.

Basic example

A basic example that mimics the standard git clone command

// Clone the given repository to the given directory
Info("git clone https://github.com/go-git/go-git")

_, err := git.PlainClone("/tmp/foo", false, &git.CloneOptions{
    URL:      "https://github.com/go-git/go-git",
    Progress: os.Stdout,
})

CheckIfError(err)

Outputs:

Counting objects: 4924, done.
Compressing objects: 100% (1333/1333), done.
Total 4924 (delta 530), reused 6 (delta 6), pack-reused 3533

In-memory example

Cloning a repository into memory and printing the history of HEAD, just like git log does

// Clones the given repository in memory, creating the remote, the local
// branches and fetching the objects, exactly as:
Info("git clone https://github.com/go-git/go-billy")

r, err := git.Clone(memory.NewStorage(), nil, &git.CloneOptions{
    URL: "https://github.com/go-git/go-billy",
})

CheckIfError(err)

// Gets the HEAD history from HEAD, just like this command:
Info("git log")

// ... retrieves the branch pointed by HEAD
ref, err := r.Head()
CheckIfError(err)


// ... retrieves the commit history
cIter, err := r.Log(&git.LogOptions{From: ref.Hash()})
CheckIfError(err)

// ... just iterates over the commits, printing it
err = cIter.ForEach(func(c *object.Commit) error {
    fmt.Println(c)
    return nil
})
CheckIfError(err)

Outputs:

commit ded8054fd0c3994453e9c8aacaf48d118d42991e
Author: Santiago M. Mola <santi@mola.io>
Date:   Sat Nov 12 21:18:41 2016 +0100

    index: ReadFrom/WriteTo returns IndexReadError/IndexWriteError. (#9)

commit df707095626f384ce2dc1a83b30f9a21d69b9dfc
Author: Santiago M. Mola <santi@mola.io>
Date:   Fri Nov 11 13:23:22 2016 +0100

    readwriter: fix bug when writing index. (#10)

    When using ReadWriter on an existing siva file, absolute offset for
    index entries was not being calculated correctly.
...

You can find this example and many others in the examples folder.

Contribute

Contributions are more than welcome, if you are interested please take a look to our Contributing Guidelines.

Author: Go-git
Source Code: https://github.com/go-git/go-git 
License: Apache-2.0 license

#go #golang #git #client 

Zander  Herzog

Zander Herzog

1596793260

Secure HTTPS servers in Go

In this article, we are going to look at some of the basic APIs of the http package to create and initialize HTTPS servers in Go.

Image for post

(source: unsplash.com)

In the “Simple Hello World Server” lesson, we learned about net/http package, how to create routes and how [ServeMux](https://golang.org/pkg/net/http/#ServeMux) works. In the “Running multiple HTTP servers” lesson, we learned about [Server](https://golang.org/pkg/net/http/#Server) structure and how to run multiple HTTP servers concurrently.

In this lesson, we are going to create an HTTPS server using both Go’s standard server configuration and custom configuration (using [_Server_](https://golang.org/pkg/net/http/#Server) structure). But before this, we need to know what HTTPS really is?

HTTPS is a big topic of discussion in itself. Hence while writing this lesson, I published an article just on “How HTTPS works?”. I advise you to read this lesson first before continuing this article. In this article, I’ve also described the encryption paradigm and SSL certificates generation process.


If we recall the simplest HTTP server example from previous lessons, we only need http.``[ListenAndServe](https://golang.org/pkg/net/http/#ListenAndServe) function to start an HTTP server and http.``[HandleFunc](https://golang.org/pkg/net/http/#HandleFunc) to register a response handler for a particular endpoint.

Image for post

(https://play.golang.org/p/t3sOenOYAzS)

In the example above, when we run the command go run server.go , it will start an HTTP server on port 9000. By visiting http://localhost:9000 URL in a browser, you will be able to see a Hello World! message on the screen.

Image for post

(http://localhost:9000)

As we know, the nil argument to ListenAndServe() call invokes Go to use the [DefaultServeMux](https://golang.org/pkg/net/http/#DefaultServeMux) response multiplexer, which is the default instance of ServeMux structure provided globally by the Go. The HandleFunc() call adds a response handler for a specific route on the multiplexer instance.

The http.ListenAndServe() call uses the Go’s standard HTTP server configuration, however, in the previous lesson, how we can customize a server using [Server](https://golang.org/pkg/net/http/#Server) structure type.

To start an HTTPS server, all we need do is to call ServerAndListenTLS method with some configuration. Just like ServeAndListen method, this method is available on both the http package and the Server structure.

The http.``[ServeAndListenTLS](https://golang.org/pkg/net/http/#ListenAndServeTLS) method uses the Go’s standard server implementation, however, both [Server](https://golang.org/pkg/net/http/#Server) instance and Server.``[ServeAndListenTLS](https://golang.org/pkg/net/http/#Server.ListenAndServeTLS) method can be configured for our needs.

#go-programming-language #go #golang-tutorial #go-programming #golang