Awesome  Rust

Awesome Rust

1665023760

Rayon: A Data Parallelism Library for Rust

Rayon

Rayon is a data-parallelism library for Rust. It is extremely lightweight and makes it easy to convert a sequential computation into a parallel one. It also guarantees data-race freedom. (You may also enjoy this blog post about Rayon, which gives more background and details about how it works, or this video, from the Rust Belt Rust conference.) Rayon is available on crates.io, and API Documentation is available on docs.rs.

Parallel iterators and more

Rayon makes it drop-dead simple to convert sequential iterators into parallel ones: usually, you just change your foo.iter() call into foo.par_iter(), and Rayon does the rest:

use rayon::prelude::*;
fn sum_of_squares(input: &[i32]) -> i32 {
    input.par_iter() // <-- just change that!
         .map(|&i| i * i)
         .sum()
}

Parallel iterators take care of deciding how to divide your data into tasks; it will dynamically adapt for maximum performance. If you need more flexibility than that, Rayon also offers the join and scope functions, which let you create parallel tasks on your own. For even more control, you can create custom threadpools rather than using Rayon's default, global threadpool.

No data races

You may have heard that parallel execution can produce all kinds of crazy bugs. Well, rest easy. Rayon's APIs all guarantee data-race freedom, which generally rules out most parallel bugs (though not all). In other words, if your code compiles, it typically does the same thing it did before.

For the most, parallel iterators in particular are guaranteed to produce the same results as their sequential counterparts. One caveat: If your iterator has side effects (for example, sending methods to other threads through a Rust channel or writing to disk), those side effects may occur in a different order. Note also that, in some cases, parallel iterators offer alternative versions of the sequential iterator methods that can have higher performance.

Using Rayon

Rayon is available on crates.io. The recommended way to use it is to add a line into your Cargo.toml such as:

[dependencies]
rayon = "1.5"

To use the Parallel Iterator APIs, a number of traits have to be in scope. The easiest way to bring those things into scope is to use the Rayon prelude. In each module where you would like to use the parallel iterator APIs, just add:

use rayon::prelude::*;

Rayon currently requires rustc 1.46.0 or greater.

Usage with WebAssembly

Rayon can work on the Web via WebAssembly, but requires an adapter and some project configuration to account for differences between WebAssembly threads and threads on the other platforms.

Check out wasm-bindgen-rayon docs for more details.

Contribution

Rayon is an open source project! If you'd like to contribute to Rayon, check out the list of "help wanted" issues. These are all (or should be) issues that are suitable for getting started, and they generally include a detailed set of instructions for what to do. Please ask questions if anything is unclear! Also, check out the Guide to Development page on the wiki. Note that all code submitted in PRs to Rayon is assumed to be licensed under Rayon's dual MIT/Apache2 licensing.

Quick demo

To see Rayon in action, check out the rayon-demo directory, which includes a number of demos of code using Rayon. For example, run this command to get a visualization of an nbody simulation. To see the effect of using Rayon, press s to run sequentially and p to run in parallel.

> cd rayon-demo
> cargo run --release -- nbody visualize

For more information on demos, try:

> cd rayon-demo
> cargo run --release -- --help

Other questions?

See the Rayon FAQ.

License

Rayon is distributed under the terms of both the MIT license and the Apache License (Version 2.0). See LICENSE-APACHE and LICENSE-MIT for details. Opening a pull request is assumed to signal agreement with these licensing terms.

Download details:

Author: rayon-rs
Source code: https://github.com/rayon-rs/rayon 
License: Apache-2.0, MIT licenses found

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Rayon: A Data Parallelism Library for Rust
 iOS App Dev

iOS App Dev

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Your Data Architecture: Simple Best Practices for Your Data Strategy

If you accumulate data on which you base your decision-making as an organization, you should probably think about your data architecture and possible best practices.

If you accumulate data on which you base your decision-making as an organization, you most probably need to think about your data architecture and consider possible best practices. Gaining a competitive edge, remaining customer-centric to the greatest extent possible, and streamlining processes to get on-the-button outcomes can all be traced back to an organization’s capacity to build a future-ready data architecture.

In what follows, we offer a short overview of the overarching capabilities of data architecture. These include user-centricity, elasticity, robustness, and the capacity to ensure the seamless flow of data at all times. Added to these are automation enablement, plus security and data governance considerations. These points from our checklist for what we perceive to be an anticipatory analytics ecosystem.

#big data #data science #big data analytics #data analysis #data architecture #data transformation #data platform #data strategy #cloud data platform #data acquisition

Gerhard  Brink

Gerhard Brink

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Getting Started With Data Lakes

Frameworks for Efficient Enterprise Analytics

The opportunities big data offers also come with very real challenges that many organizations are facing today. Often, it’s finding the most cost-effective, scalable way to store and process boundless volumes of data in multiple formats that come from a growing number of sources. Then organizations need the analytical capabilities and flexibility to turn this data into insights that can meet their specific business objectives.

This Refcard dives into how a data lake helps tackle these challenges at both ends — from its enhanced architecture that’s designed for efficient data ingestion, storage, and management to its advanced analytics functionality and performance flexibility. You’ll also explore key benefits and common use cases.

Introduction

As technology continues to evolve with new data sources, such as IoT sensors and social media churning out large volumes of data, there has never been a better time to discuss the possibilities and challenges of managing such data for varying analytical insights. In this Refcard, we dig deep into how data lakes solve the problem of storing and processing enormous amounts of data. While doing so, we also explore the benefits of data lakes, their use cases, and how they differ from data warehouses (DWHs).


This is a preview of the Getting Started With Data Lakes Refcard. To read the entire Refcard, please download the PDF from the link above.

#big data #data analytics #data analysis #business analytics #data warehouse #data storage #data lake #data lake architecture #data lake governance #data lake management

Gerhard  Brink

Gerhard Brink

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Introduction to Data Libraries for Small Data Science Teams

At smaller companies access to and control of data is one of the biggest challenges faced by data analysts and data scientists. The same is true at larger companies when an analytics team is forced to navigate bureaucracy, cybersecurity and over-taxed IT, rather than benefit from a team of data engineers dedicated to collecting and making good data available.

Creative, persistent analysts find ways to get access to at least some of this data. Through a combination of daily processes to save email attachments, run database queries, and copy and paste from internal web pages one might build up a mighty collection of data sets on a personal computer or in a team shared drive or even a database.

But this solution does not scale well, and is rarely documented and understood by others who could take it over if a particular analyst moves on to a different role or company. In addition, it is a nightmare to maintain. One may spend a significant part of each day executing these processes and troubleshooting failures; there may be little time to actually use this data!

I lived this for years at different companies. We found ways to be effective but data management took up way too much of our time and energy. Often, we did not have the data we needed to answer a question. I continued to learn from the ingenuity of others and my own trial and error, which led me to the theoretical framework that I will present in this blog series: building a self-managed data library.

A data library is _not _a data warehousedata lake, or any other formal BI architecture. It does not require any particular technology or skill set (coding will not be required but it will greatly increase the speed at which you can build and the degree of automation possible). So what is a data library and how can a small data analytics team use it to overcome the challenges I’ve described?

#big data #cloud & devops #data libraries #small data science teams #introduction to data libraries for small data science teams #data science

Cyrus  Kreiger

Cyrus Kreiger

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How Has COVID-19 Impacted Data Science?

The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted supply chains and brought economies around the world to a standstill. In turn, businesses need access to accurate, timely data more than ever before. As a result, the demand for data analytics is skyrocketing as businesses try to navigate an uncertain future. However, the sudden surge in demand comes with its own set of challenges.

Here is how the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting the data industry and how enterprises can prepare for the data challenges to come in 2021 and beyond.

#big data #data #data analysis #data security #data integration #etl #data warehouse #data breach #elt

Macey  Kling

Macey Kling

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Applications Of Data Science On 3D Imagery Data

CVDC 2020, the Computer Vision conference of the year, is scheduled for 13th and 14th of August to bring together the leading experts on Computer Vision from around the world. Organised by the Association of Data Scientists (ADaSCi), the premier global professional body of data science and machine learning professionals, it is a first-of-its-kind virtual conference on Computer Vision.

The second day of the conference started with quite an informative talk on the current pandemic situation. Speaking of talks, the second session “Application of Data Science Algorithms on 3D Imagery Data” was presented by Ramana M, who is the Principal Data Scientist in Analytics at Cyient Ltd.

Ramana talked about one of the most important assets of organisations, data and how the digital world is moving from using 2D data to 3D data for highly accurate information along with realistic user experiences.

The agenda of the talk included an introduction to 3D data, its applications and case studies, 3D data alignment, 3D data for object detection and two general case studies, which are-

  • Industrial metrology for quality assurance.
  • 3d object detection and its volumetric analysis.

This talk discussed the recent advances in 3D data processing, feature extraction methods, object type detection, object segmentation, and object measurements in different body cross-sections. It also covered the 3D imagery concepts, the various algorithms for faster data processing on the GPU environment, and the application of deep learning techniques for object detection and segmentation.

#developers corner #3d data #3d data alignment #applications of data science on 3d imagery data #computer vision #cvdc 2020 #deep learning techniques for 3d data #mesh data #point cloud data #uav data