Rory  West

Rory West

1622214600

AWS EKS vs. ECS vs. Fargate: Where to manage your Kubernetes?

We all love containers for their scalability. But it might easily become your overhead if you end up managing a large cluster.

This is where container orchestration comes in. When operating at scale, you need a platform that automates all the tasks related to the management, deployment and scaling of container clusters.

There’s a reason why almost 90% of containers are orchestrated today.

If you’re using Kubernetes on AWS, there are several options you can choose from:

  • Elastic Container Service (ECS),
  • Elastic Kubernetes Service (EKS),
  • AWS Fargate.

Read on to find out which one is a better match for your workloads.

And if you know what’s what in the world of AWS Kubernetes, you could still probably use a few best practices to reduce your cloud bill.

#aws #aws-eks #fargate #kubernetes #aws-ec2

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AWS EKS vs. ECS vs. Fargate: Where to manage your Kubernetes?
Christa  Stehr

Christa Stehr

1602964260

50+ Useful Kubernetes Tools for 2020 - Part 2

Introduction

Last year, we provided a list of Kubernetes tools that proved so popular we have decided to curate another list of some useful additions for working with the platform—among which are many tools that we personally use here at Caylent. Check out the original tools list here in case you missed it.

According to a recent survey done by Stackrox, the dominance Kubernetes enjoys in the market continues to be reinforced, with 86% of respondents using it for container orchestration.

(State of Kubernetes and Container Security, 2020)

And as you can see below, more and more companies are jumping into containerization for their apps. If you’re among them, here are some tools to aid you going forward as Kubernetes continues its rapid growth.

(State of Kubernetes and Container Security, 2020)

#blog #tools #amazon elastic kubernetes service #application security #aws kms #botkube #caylent #cli #container monitoring #container orchestration tools #container security #containers #continuous delivery #continuous deployment #continuous integration #contour #developers #development #developments #draft #eksctl #firewall #gcp #github #harbor #helm #helm charts #helm-2to3 #helm-aws-secret-plugin #helm-docs #helm-operator-get-started #helm-secrets #iam #json #k-rail #k3s #k3sup #k8s #keel.sh #keycloak #kiali #kiam #klum #knative #krew #ksniff #kube #kube-prod-runtime #kube-ps1 #kube-scan #kube-state-metrics #kube2iam #kubeapps #kubebuilder #kubeconfig #kubectl #kubectl-aws-secrets #kubefwd #kubernetes #kubernetes command line tool #kubernetes configuration #kubernetes deployment #kubernetes in development #kubernetes in production #kubernetes ingress #kubernetes interfaces #kubernetes monitoring #kubernetes networking #kubernetes observability #kubernetes plugins #kubernetes secrets #kubernetes security #kubernetes security best practices #kubernetes security vendors #kubernetes service discovery #kubernetic #kubesec #kubeterminal #kubeval #kudo #kuma #microsoft azure key vault #mozilla sops #octant #octarine #open source #palo alto kubernetes security #permission-manager #pgp #rafay #rakess #rancher #rook #secrets operations #serverless function #service mesh #shell-operator #snyk #snyk container #sonobuoy #strongdm #tcpdump #tenkai #testing #tigera #tilt #vert.x #wireshark #yaml

AWS Fargate for Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service | Caylent

On-demand cloud computing brings new ways to ensure scalability and efficiency. Rather than pre-allocating and managing certain server resources or having to go through the usual process of setting up a cloud cluster, apps and microservices can now rely on on-demand serverless computing blocks designed to be efficient and highly optimized.

Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service (EKS) already makes running Kubernetes on AWS very easy. Support for AWS Fargate, which introduces the on-demand serverless computing element to the environment, makes deploying Kubernetes pods even easier and more efficient. AWS Fargate offers a wide range of features that make managing clusters and pods intuitive.

Utilizing Fargate
As with many other AWS services, using Fargate to manage Kubernetes clusters is very easy to do. To integrate Fargate and run a cluster on top of it, you only need to add the command –fargate to the end of your eksctl command.

EKS automatically configures the cluster to run on Fargate. It creates a pod execution role so that pod creation and management can be automated in an on-demand environment. It also patches coredns so the cluster can run smoothly on Fargate.

A Fargate profile is automatically created by the command. You can choose to customize the profile later or configure namespaces yourself, but the default profile is suitable for a wide range of applications already, requiring no human input other than a namespace for the cluster.

There are some prerequisites to keep in mind though. For starters, Fargate requires eksctl version 0.20.0 or later. Fargate also comes with some limitations, starting with support for only a handful of regions. For example, Fargate doesn’t support stateful apps, DaemonSets or privileged containers at the moment. Check out this link for Fargate limitations for your consideration.

Support for conventional load balancing is also limited, which is why ALB Ingress Controller is recommended. At the time of this writing, Classic Load Balancers and Network Load Balancers are not supported yet.

However, you can still be very meticulous in how you manage your clusters, including using different clusters to separate trusted and untrusted workloads.

Everything else is straightforward. Once the cluster is created, you can begin specifying pod execution roles for Fargate. You have the ability to use IAM console to create a role and assign it to a Fargate cluster. Or you can also create IAM roles and Fargate profiles via Terraform.

#aws #blog #amazon eks #aws fargate #aws management console #aws services #kubernetes #kubernetes clusters #kubernetes deployment #kubernetes pods

Rory  West

Rory West

1622214600

AWS EKS vs. ECS vs. Fargate: Where to manage your Kubernetes?

We all love containers for their scalability. But it might easily become your overhead if you end up managing a large cluster.

This is where container orchestration comes in. When operating at scale, you need a platform that automates all the tasks related to the management, deployment and scaling of container clusters.

There’s a reason why almost 90% of containers are orchestrated today.

If you’re using Kubernetes on AWS, there are several options you can choose from:

  • Elastic Container Service (ECS),
  • Elastic Kubernetes Service (EKS),
  • AWS Fargate.

Read on to find out which one is a better match for your workloads.

And if you know what’s what in the world of AWS Kubernetes, you could still probably use a few best practices to reduce your cloud bill.

#aws #aws-eks #fargate #kubernetes #aws-ec2

Containers on AWS - EKS Vs ECS Vs Fargate Vs ElasticBeanstalk Vs Lightsail Vs AppRunner

There are so many AWS container services to run your docker container. Which service should you choose? In this video we will compare all the AWS container services and go over the pros cons. We will compare EKS (Elastic Kubernetes Service) vs. ECS (Elastic Container Service) vs. Fargate vs Elastic Beanstalk vs. Lightsail vs. App Runner.

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Timestamps:
00:00​ EKS Pros and Cons
03:08​ ECS Pros and Cons
06:39​ Fargate Pros and Cons
09:13​ Elastic Beanstalk Pros and Cons
12:48​ Lightsail Pros and Cons
15:41​ App Runner pros and Cons
17:17​ Recommendations

#eks #ecs #fargate #elasticbeanstalk #lightsail #apprunner #aws

#aws #containers #eks #ecs #fargate #elasticbeanstalk

Hudson  Kunde

Hudson Kunde

1595647980

AWS Fargate for Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service

On-demand cloud computing brings new ways to ensure scalability and efficiency. Rather than pre-allocating and managing certain server resources or having to go through the usual process of setting up a cloud cluster, apps and microservices can now rely on on-demand serverless computing blocks designed to be efficient and highly optimized.

Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service (EKS)already makes running Kubernetes on AWS very easy. Support for AWS Fargate, which introduces the on-demand serverless computing element to the environment, makes deploying Kubernetes pods even easier and more efficient. AWS Fargate offers a wide range of features that make managing clusters and pods intuitive.

Utilizing Fargate

As with many other AWS services, using Fargate to manage Kubernetes clusters is very easy to do. To integrate Fargate and run a cluster on top of it, you only need to add the command –fargate to the end of your eksctl command.

EKS automatically configures the cluster to run on Fargate. It creates a pod execution role so that pod creation and management can be automated in an on-demand environment. It also patches coredns so the cluster can run smoothly on Fargate.

A Fargate profile is automatically created by the command. You can choose to customize the profile later or configure namespaces yourself, but the default profile is suitable for a wide range of applications already, requiring no human input other than a namespace for the cluster.

There are some prerequisites to keep in mind though. For starters, Fargate requires eksctl version 0.20.0 or later. Fargate also comes with some limitations, starting with support for only a handful of regions. For example, Fargate doesn’t support stateful apps, DaemonSets or privileged containers at the moment. Check out this link for Fargate limitations for your consideration.

Support for conventional load balancing is also limited, which is why ALB Ingress Controller is recommended. At the time of this writing, Classic Load Balancers and Network Load Balancers are not supported yet.

However, you can still be very meticulous in how you manage your clusters, including using different clusters to separate trusted and untrusted workloads.

Everything else is straightforward. Once the cluster is created, you can begin specifying pod execution roles for Fargate. You have the ability to use IAM console to create a role and assign it to a Fargate cluster. Or you can also create IAM roles and Fargate profiles via Terraform.

#aws #kubernetes #containers #cluster management #eks #fargate #amazon eks