Ssekidde  Nat

Ssekidde Nat

1624871880

Azure Databricks previews parallelized Photon query engine

Microsoft has unveiled a preview of a C+±based vectorized query engine for the Azure Databricks cloud analytics and AI service based on Apache Spark. Azure Databricks, which is delivered in partnership with Databricks, introduced the Photon-powered Delta Engine September 22.

Written in C++ and compatible with Spark APIs, Photon is a vectorized query engine that leverages modern CPU architecture and the Delta Lake open source transactional storage layer to enhance Apache Spark 3.0 performance by as much as 20x. Microsoft said that as organizations embrace data-driven decision-making, it is now imperative for them to have a platform that can quickly analyze massive amounts and types of data.

#azure databricks #databricks #photon query engine

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Azure Databricks previews parallelized Photon query engine
Ssekidde  Nat

Ssekidde Nat

1624871880

Azure Databricks previews parallelized Photon query engine

Microsoft has unveiled a preview of a C+±based vectorized query engine for the Azure Databricks cloud analytics and AI service based on Apache Spark. Azure Databricks, which is delivered in partnership with Databricks, introduced the Photon-powered Delta Engine September 22.

Written in C++ and compatible with Spark APIs, Photon is a vectorized query engine that leverages modern CPU architecture and the Delta Lake open source transactional storage layer to enhance Apache Spark 3.0 performance by as much as 20x. Microsoft said that as organizations embrace data-driven decision-making, it is now imperative for them to have a platform that can quickly analyze massive amounts and types of data.

#azure databricks #databricks #photon query engine

Eric  Bukenya

Eric Bukenya

1624742940

Azure Databricks previews parallelized Photon query engine

Microsoft has unveiled a preview of a C+±based vectorized query engine for the Azure Databricks cloud analytics and AI service based on Apache Spark. Azure Databricks, which is delivered in partnership with Databricks, introduced the Photon-powered Delta Engine September 22.

Written in C++ and compatible with Spark APIs, Photon is a vectorized query engine that leverages modern CPU architecture and the Delta Lake open source transactional storage layer to enhance Apache Spark 3.0 performance by as much as 20x. Microsoft said that as organizations embrace data-driven decision-making, it is now imperative for them to have a platform that can quickly analyze massive amounts and types of data.

#azure databricks #photon query engine #azure

Aisu  Joesph

Aisu Joesph

1626490533

Azure Series #2: Single Server Deployment (Output)

No organization that is on the growth path or intending to have a more customer base and new entry into the market will restrict its infrastructure and design for one Database option. There are two levels of Database selection

  • a.  **The needs assessment **
  • **b. Selecting the kind of database **
  • c. Selection of Queues for communication
  • d. Selecting the technology player

Options to choose from:

  1. Transactional Databases:
    • Azure selection — Data Factory, Redis, CosmosDB, Azure SQL, Postgres SQL, MySQL, MariaDB, SQL Database, Maria DB, Managed Server
  2. Data warehousing:
    • Azure selection — CosmosDB
    • Delta Lake — Data Brick’s Lakehouse Architecture.
  3. Non-Relational Database:
  4. _- _Azure selection — CosmosDB
  5. Data Lake:
    • Azure Data Lake
    • Delta Lake — Data Bricks.
  6. Big Data and Analytics:
    • Data Bricks
    • Azure — HDInsights, Azure Synapse Analytics, Event Hubs, Data Lake Storage gen1, Azure Data Explorer Clusters, Data Factories, Azure Data Bricks, Analytics Services, Stream Analytics, Website UI, Cognitive Search, PowerBI, Queries, Reports.
  7. Machine Learning:
    • Azure — Azure Synapse Analytics, Machine Learning, Genomics accounts, Bot Services, Machine Learning Studio, Cognitive Services, Bonsai.

Key Data platform services would like to highlight

  • 1. Azure Data Factory (ADF)
  • 2. Azure Synapse Analytics
  • 3. Azure Stream Analytics
  • 4. Azure Databricks
  • 5. Azure Cognitive Services
  • 6. Azure Data Lake Storage
  • 7. Azure HDInsight
  • 8. Azure CosmosDB
  • 9. Azure SQL Database

#azure-databricks #azure #microsoft-azure-analytics #azure-data-factory #azure series

Eric  Bukenya

Eric Bukenya

1624713540

Learn NoSQL in Azure: Diving Deeper into Azure Cosmos DB

This article is a part of the series – Learn NoSQL in Azure where we explore Azure Cosmos DB as a part of the non-relational database system used widely for a variety of applications. Azure Cosmos DB is a part of Microsoft’s serverless databases on Azure which is highly scalable and distributed across all locations that run on Azure. It is offered as a platform as a service (PAAS) from Azure and you can develop databases that have a very high throughput and very low latency. Using Azure Cosmos DB, customers can replicate their data across multiple locations across the globe and also across multiple locations within the same region. This makes Cosmos DB a highly available database service with almost 99.999% availability for reads and writes for multi-region modes and almost 99.99% availability for single-region modes.

In this article, we will focus more on how Azure Cosmos DB works behind the scenes and how can you get started with it using the Azure Portal. We will also explore how Cosmos DB is priced and understand the pricing model in detail.

How Azure Cosmos DB works

As already mentioned, Azure Cosmos DB is a multi-modal NoSQL database service that is geographically distributed across multiple Azure locations. This helps customers to deploy the databases across multiple locations around the globe. This is beneficial as it helps to reduce the read latency when the users use the application.

As you can see in the figure above, Azure Cosmos DB is distributed across the globe. Let’s suppose you have a web application that is hosted in India. In that case, the NoSQL database in India will be considered as the master database for writes and all the other databases can be considered as a read replicas. Whenever new data is generated, it is written to the database in India first and then it is synchronized with the other databases.

Consistency Levels

While maintaining data over multiple regions, the most common challenge is the latency as when the data is made available to the other databases. For example, when data is written to the database in India, users from India will be able to see that data sooner than users from the US. This is due to the latency in synchronization between the two regions. In order to overcome this, there are a few modes that customers can choose from and define how often or how soon they want their data to be made available in the other regions. Azure Cosmos DB offers five levels of consistency which are as follows:

  • Strong
  • Bounded staleness
  • Session
  • Consistent prefix
  • Eventual

In most common NoSQL databases, there are only two levels – Strong and EventualStrong being the most consistent level while Eventual is the least. However, as we move from Strong to Eventual, consistency decreases but availability and throughput increase. This is a trade-off that customers need to decide based on the criticality of their applications. If you want to read in more detail about the consistency levels, the official guide from Microsoft is the easiest to understand. You can refer to it here.

Azure Cosmos DB Pricing Model

Now that we have some idea about working with the NoSQL database – Azure Cosmos DB on Azure, let us try to understand how the database is priced. In order to work with any cloud-based services, it is essential that you have a sound knowledge of how the services are charged, otherwise, you might end up paying something much higher than your expectations.

If you browse to the pricing page of Azure Cosmos DB, you can see that there are two modes in which the database services are billed.

  • Database Operations – Whenever you execute or run queries against your NoSQL database, there are some resources being used. Azure terms these usages in terms of Request Units or RU. The amount of RU consumed per second is aggregated and billed
  • Consumed Storage – As you start storing data in your database, it will take up some space in order to store that data. This storage is billed per the standard SSD-based storage across any Azure locations globally

Let’s learn about this in more detail.

#azure #azure cosmos db #nosql #azure #nosql in azure #azure cosmos db

Ahebwe  Oscar

Ahebwe Oscar

1620185280

How model queries work in Django

How model queries work in Django

Welcome to my blog, hey everyone in this article we are going to be working with queries in Django so for any web app that you build your going to want to write a query so you can retrieve information from your database so in this article I’ll be showing you all the different ways that you can write queries and it should cover about 90% of the cases that you’ll have when you’re writing your code the other 10% depend on your specific use case you may have to get more complicated but for the most part what I cover in this article should be able to help you so let’s start with the model that I have I’ve already created it.

**Read More : **How to make Chatbot in Python.

Read More : Django Admin Full Customization step by step

let’s just get into this diagram that I made so in here:

django queries aboutDescribe each parameter in Django querset

we’re making a simple query for the myModel table so we want to pull out all the information in the database so we have this variable which is gonna hold a return value and we have our myModel models so this is simply the myModel model name so whatever you named your model just make sure you specify that and we’re gonna access the objects attribute once we get that object’s attribute we can simply use the all method and this will return all the information in the database so we’re gonna start with all and then we will go into getting single items filtering that data and go to our command prompt.

Here and we’ll actually start making our queries from here to do this let’s just go ahead and run** Python manage.py shell** and I am in my project file so make sure you’re in there when you start and what this does is it gives us an interactive shell to actually start working with our data so this is a lot like the Python shell but because we did manage.py it allows us to do things a Django way and actually query our database now open up the command prompt and let’s go ahead and start making our first queries.

#django #django model queries #django orm #django queries #django query #model django query #model query #query with django