Alex Tyler

Alex Tyler

1594699946

How to Run Locally Built Docker Images in Kubernetes

While working with Kubernetes locally, you may want to run some locally built Docker images in Kubernetes. This may not work out-of-the-box, because minikube uses its own local Docker registry that’s not connected to the one on your local machine.

In this article, I’ll show how easy it is to run locally built images in Kubernetes, without publishing them to a global registry. For this article, I suppose you already have kubectl and minikube installed locally. This article is targeted on Linux environment.

I start with creating the following trivial Dockerfilethat runs busybox and outputs “Hello World”:

FROM busybox

CMD [“echo”, “Hello World!”]

I now build it:

> docker build . -t forketyfork/hello-world

I can now run a container from this image and see that it works as expected:

> docker run forketyfork/hello-world
Hello World!

Next, I create the helloworld.yml configuration file to run this container as a Kubernetes job:

apiVersion: batch/v1
kind: Job
metadata:
  name: hello-world
spec:
  template:
    metadata:
      name: hello-world-pod
    spec:
      containers:
      - name: hello-world
        image: forketyfork/hello-world
      restartPolicy: Never

Notice that I’ve specified the name of the image I just built and set the restartPolicy to Never, so that it would only run once and terminate.

#kubernetes #minikube #docker #dockerfiles

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

How to Run Locally Built Docker Images in Kubernetes
Christa  Stehr

Christa Stehr

1602964260

50+ Useful Kubernetes Tools for 2020 - Part 2

Introduction

Last year, we provided a list of Kubernetes tools that proved so popular we have decided to curate another list of some useful additions for working with the platform—among which are many tools that we personally use here at Caylent. Check out the original tools list here in case you missed it.

According to a recent survey done by Stackrox, the dominance Kubernetes enjoys in the market continues to be reinforced, with 86% of respondents using it for container orchestration.

(State of Kubernetes and Container Security, 2020)

And as you can see below, more and more companies are jumping into containerization for their apps. If you’re among them, here are some tools to aid you going forward as Kubernetes continues its rapid growth.

(State of Kubernetes and Container Security, 2020)

#blog #tools #amazon elastic kubernetes service #application security #aws kms #botkube #caylent #cli #container monitoring #container orchestration tools #container security #containers #continuous delivery #continuous deployment #continuous integration #contour #developers #development #developments #draft #eksctl #firewall #gcp #github #harbor #helm #helm charts #helm-2to3 #helm-aws-secret-plugin #helm-docs #helm-operator-get-started #helm-secrets #iam #json #k-rail #k3s #k3sup #k8s #keel.sh #keycloak #kiali #kiam #klum #knative #krew #ksniff #kube #kube-prod-runtime #kube-ps1 #kube-scan #kube-state-metrics #kube2iam #kubeapps #kubebuilder #kubeconfig #kubectl #kubectl-aws-secrets #kubefwd #kubernetes #kubernetes command line tool #kubernetes configuration #kubernetes deployment #kubernetes in development #kubernetes in production #kubernetes ingress #kubernetes interfaces #kubernetes monitoring #kubernetes networking #kubernetes observability #kubernetes plugins #kubernetes secrets #kubernetes security #kubernetes security best practices #kubernetes security vendors #kubernetes service discovery #kubernetic #kubesec #kubeterminal #kubeval #kudo #kuma #microsoft azure key vault #mozilla sops #octant #octarine #open source #palo alto kubernetes security #permission-manager #pgp #rafay #rakess #rancher #rook #secrets operations #serverless function #service mesh #shell-operator #snyk #snyk container #sonobuoy #strongdm #tcpdump #tenkai #testing #tigera #tilt #vert.x #wireshark #yaml

Alex Tyler

Alex Tyler

1594699946

How to Run Locally Built Docker Images in Kubernetes

While working with Kubernetes locally, you may want to run some locally built Docker images in Kubernetes. This may not work out-of-the-box, because minikube uses its own local Docker registry that’s not connected to the one on your local machine.

In this article, I’ll show how easy it is to run locally built images in Kubernetes, without publishing them to a global registry. For this article, I suppose you already have kubectl and minikube installed locally. This article is targeted on Linux environment.

I start with creating the following trivial Dockerfilethat runs busybox and outputs “Hello World”:

FROM busybox

CMD [“echo”, “Hello World!”]

I now build it:

> docker build . -t forketyfork/hello-world

I can now run a container from this image and see that it works as expected:

> docker run forketyfork/hello-world
Hello World!

Next, I create the helloworld.yml configuration file to run this container as a Kubernetes job:

apiVersion: batch/v1
kind: Job
metadata:
  name: hello-world
spec:
  template:
    metadata:
      name: hello-world-pod
    spec:
      containers:
      - name: hello-world
        image: forketyfork/hello-world
      restartPolicy: Never

Notice that I’ve specified the name of the image I just built and set the restartPolicy to Never, so that it would only run once and terminate.

#kubernetes #minikube #docker #dockerfiles

Docker manifest - A peek into image's manifest.json files

docker manifest – An experimental feature !

The image manifest provides a configuration and a set of layers for a container image.

This is an experimental feature. To enable this feature in the Docker CLI, one can edit the config.json file found in ~/.docker/config.json like :

{
        "auths": {
                "https://index.docker.io/v1/": {
                        "auth": "XXXXXXX"
                }
        },
        "HttpHeaders": {
                "User-Agent": "Docker-Client/19.03.8 (linux)"
        },
        "experimental": "enabled",
        "debug": true
}

What is ‘docker manifest’ ?

The docker manifest command does not work independently to perform any action. In order to work with the docker manifest or manifest list, we use sub-commands along with it. This manifest sub-command can enable us to interact with the image manifests. Furthermore, it also gives information about the OS and the architecture, that a particular image was built for.

A single manifest comprises of information about an image, it’s size, the layers and digest.

A manifest list is a list of image layers (manifests) that are, created by specifying one or more image names. It can then be used in the same way as an image name in docker pull and docker run commands.

Commands to get started with :

After enabling this feature, one would be able to access the following command :

docker-manifest-enter image description here

These commands are easy to use. It basically avoids the need for pulling and running and then testing the images locally, from a docker registry.

Next, to inspect an image manifest, follow this syntax,

 docker manifest inspect image-name

enter image description here

.

#devops #docker #devops #docker #docker learning #docker-image

Docker creating an image | Build and run your image | Docker Fundamentals

Docker create an image from a container | Creating your own image | How to create Docker Image from a Container and Dockerfile.

#docker #image #dockers

Jamal  Lemke

Jamal Lemke

1600711200

How to Use Own Docker Images on Minikube — Easy Way

This brief post will bring you a quick and an effective way to use your own build docker images / docker image dumps on minikube.

There are some articles like this explaining one method to use _Own Local Docker Images With Minikube. _For some cases: such as when you are building docker images from a library or a programming language tool like ballerina, you might not be able to use the above mentioned method. Example case: Try to compile this ballerina example with having followed previously mentioned method.

#minikube #docker-image #docker-image-dump #local-kubernetes