Jacob Banks

Jacob Banks

1578148086

8 JavaScript Testing Tools You Should Know in 2020

In this piece, I will take you through reviews and analyses of the 2019 State of JavaScript report to show you JavaScript testing frameworks that will take center stage in 2020.

State of JavaScript

In the wake of 2019, we’ll take a look at the state of JavaScript as reflected in insights from State of JS, which surveyed over 21,000 developers across the world.

What is StateOfJS?

State of JS is basically an annual survey of everything JavaScript where opinions of developers who take the survey are recorded and beautifully visualized to show insights that signify the state of JavaScript in that year.

The data points cover frontend web development frameworks, databases, state management, relationships between frameworks, reception and ease of use, languages that compile to JavaScript, mobile frameworks, build tools, JavaScript testing tools, and a whole lot more.

It is a very comprehensive JavaScript survey that was started in 2016 by Sacha Greif and a few other helpers. Now it has over 21,000 developer responses in this latest edition.

Why StateOfJS?

In my opinion, State of JS is actually the very first JavaScript-only developer survey that is universally respected as far as the JavaScript community is concerned.

There are other very popular surveys like the StackOverflow developer survey, which draws on over 100,000 respondents. Jetbrain’s State of Developer Ecosystem Report is also pretty comprehensive, with over 6,000 respondents.

Testing tools

According to survey insights, these are the most in-demand testing tools by JavaScript developers in 2019 arranged in the order of importance determined by awareness, interests, and satisfaction.

Jest

Jest
Jest is one of the most popular JavaScript testing frameworks built and constantly maintained by the team at Facebook. It is a zero-configuration JavaScript testing framework recommended by React and the most easy to use.

Jest has a very impressive acceptance rate in 2018 and even more so this year among the JavaScript community. Jest is currently being used by over 1.5 million projects, according to GitHub data.

In the last 12 months, the retention rate has increased drastically from 39% to 61%. This is a recurrent growth rate, as it also increased from 2017 to 2018.

Also the percentage of people interested in Jest has reduced. The number is now at 22%, down from 29%. Most of them are now return users as shown by the retention insights.

Mocha

Mocha

Mocha has been one of the most-used JavaScript testing frameworks for years now. It’s used with third party assertions, mocking, and spying tools like Chai or Enzyme. Aside from its massive ecosystem, Mocha has well-established options with a great documentation.

It is very flexible and open to a lot of extensions. Mocha has been used by over 900,000 projects, according to GitHub data.

According to the survey insights, the retention rate has grown from 39% to 42% in the last 12 months. About 8% of respondents have not heard about Mocha, and there is an awareness gap which Mocha is constantly filling, because last year the percentage was 10.

Storybook

Storybook
Storybook is a development environment for UI components.

It allows you to browse a component library, view the different states of each component, and interactively develop and test components. It has been starred about 44,000 times on GitHub and has a massive userbase.

The retention rate of using Storybook doubled from 15% to 32% in 12 months, and the interest level also rose from 23% to 26% in the same timeframe.

Storybook was not even on developers’ radar last year, but there has been massive growth in 2019 and heading into 2020. It will be an interesting year.

Cypress

cypress.png

Cypress is a very fast and reliable JavaScript testing tool. It basically injects tests into a web application, provides a very clear and extensive documentation, and is in constant competition with another testing framework called TestCafe.

It is being used by over 25,000 projects, according to GitHub data.

The retention rate is 23%, and the interest rate is 28% for Cypress. There is an awareness gap, which Cypress is working to fill.

Enzyme

enzyme

Enzyme is a JavaScript Testing utility for React that makes it easier to test your React Components’ output. You can also manipulate, traverse, and in some ways simulate runtime given the output.

Enzyme’s API is meant to be intuitive and flexible by mimicking jQuery’s API for DOM manipulation and traversal.

The retention rate grew from 20% to 23% in the last 12 months. There is also a bridge of awareness gap all the way from 46% to 38%.

Ava

ava
Ava is a test runner for Node.js with a concise API, detailed error output, embrace of new language features, and process isolation that lets you write tests more effectively.

With Ava, you can ship more awesome code. It is currently being used by 47,000 projects, according to GitHub data.

Last year, about 72% of the JavaScript developers had heard of Ava. This year, that number has reduced to 69%, while the retention rate has grown to 5%.

Jasmine

Jasmine
Jasmine is a Behavior Driven Development testing framework for JavaScript.

It does not rely on browsers, DOM, or any JavaScript framework. As a result, it is suited for websites, Node.js projects, or anywhere that JavaScript can run.

According to survey insights, the retention rate slightly increased in the past 12 months. However, there is a growing gap in awareness, which Jasmine can try to bridge in 2020.

Puppeteer

puppeteer-nocdn.png
Puppeteer, built by the team at Google, is a Node library that provides a high-level API to control Chrome or Chromium over the DevTools Protocol.

Puppeteer runs headless by default, but it can be configured to run full (non-headless) Chrome or Chromium. It’s also fast, since it’s native.

The survey insights show a retention rate of 24.3% for Puppeteer, and an interest rate of 24%. There is a need for more awareness for the product, although it is already being used by over 55,000 projects.

In summary

Puppeteer and Cypress were new entrants identified by JavaScript developers this year. Since 2016, it’s been Mocha, Jasmine, Jest, Enzyme, and Ava.

It seems there is a kind of even distribution of developers-to-testing-tools, although Jest seems to be leading the market with over 96% of its users being return users.

What testing framework do you use? Tell me down in the comments section.

#javascript #testing #web-development

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

8 JavaScript Testing Tools You Should Know in 2020
Aurelie  Block

Aurelie Block

1598916060

Top 10 Automation Testing Tools: 2020 Edition

The demand for delivering quality software faster — or “Quality at Speed” — requires organizations to search for solutions in Agile, continuous integration (CI), and DevOps methodologies. Test automation is an essential part of these aspects. The latest World Quality Report 2018–2019 suggests that test automation is the biggest bottleneck to deliver “Quality at Speed,” as it is an enabler of successful Agile and DevOps adoption.

Test automation cannot be realized without good tools; as they determine how automation is performed and whether the benefits of automation can be delivered. Test automation tools is a crucial component in the DevOps toolchain. The current test automation trends have increased in applying artificial intelligence and machine learning (AI/ML) to offer advanced capabilities for test optimization, intelligent test generation, execution, and reporting. It will be worthwhile to understand which tools are best poised to take advantage of these trends.****

#automation-testing #automation-testing-tools #testing #testing-tools #selenium #open-source #test-automation #automated-testing

Brain  Crist

Brain Crist

1594753020

Citrix Bugs Allow Unauthenticated Code Injection, Data Theft

Multiple vulnerabilities in the Citrix Application Delivery Controller (ADC) and Gateway would allow code injection, information disclosure and denial of service, the networking vendor announced Tuesday. Four of the bugs are exploitable by an unauthenticated, remote attacker.

The Citrix products (formerly known as NetScaler ADC and Gateway) are used for application-aware traffic management and secure remote access, respectively, and are installed in at least 80,000 companies in 158 countries, according to a December assessment from Positive Technologies.

Other flaws announced Tuesday also affect Citrix SD-WAN WANOP appliances, models 4000-WO, 4100-WO, 5000-WO and 5100-WO.

Attacks on the management interface of the products could result in system compromise by an unauthenticated user on the management network; or system compromise through cross-site scripting (XSS). Attackers could also create a download link for the device which, if downloaded and then executed by an unauthenticated user on the management network, could result in the compromise of a local computer.

“Customers who have configured their systems in accordance with Citrix recommendations [i.e., to have this interface separated from the network and protected by a firewall] have significantly reduced their risk from attacks to the management interface,” according to the vendor.

Threat actors could also mount attacks on Virtual IPs (VIPs). VIPs, among other things, are used to provide users with a unique IP address for communicating with network resources for applications that do not allow multiple connections or users from the same IP address.

The VIP attacks include denial of service against either the Gateway or Authentication virtual servers by an unauthenticated user; or remote port scanning of the internal network by an authenticated Citrix Gateway user.

“Attackers can only discern whether a TLS connection is possible with the port and cannot communicate further with the end devices,” according to the critical Citrix advisory. “Customers who have not enabled either the Gateway or Authentication virtual servers are not at risk from attacks that are applicable to those servers. Other virtual servers e.g. load balancing and content switching virtual servers are not affected by these issues.”

A final vulnerability has been found in Citrix Gateway Plug-in for Linux that would allow a local logged-on user of a Linux system with that plug-in installed to elevate their privileges to an administrator account on that computer, the company said.

#vulnerabilities #adc #citrix #code injection #critical advisory #cve-2020-8187 #cve-2020-8190 #cve-2020-8191 #cve-2020-8193 #cve-2020-8194 #cve-2020-8195 #cve-2020-8196 #cve-2020-8197 #cve-2020-8198 #cve-2020-8199 #denial of service #gateway #information disclosure #patches #security advisory #security bugs

Top 10 Mobile Performance Testing Tools

Challenge for brands: how to offer a seamless, fast, and user-friendly mobile experience?

App users have a low tolerance for slowness, with a reported 43% of users unhappy if they have to wait longer than three seconds for an app to load. ([App Samurai])

It’s not enough to ensure that your mobile app functions properly, but also to test how it behaves on different devices, under heavy user load, different network connections, etcetera. It’s equally important to test different metrics on both the client-side as well as the server-side. This is where finding the right tool or set of tools for mobile performance testing is essential.

After extensively researching, I’ve put together a list of top-rated mobile performance testing tools and provided an overview of each below.

#testing #load testing tool #testing tools #performance #mobile testing tools

In-house Tool for Performance Testing

In the software development cycle, testing is one of the important criteria. There are many tools available in this space for testing such as Junit, Jmeter, manual, automation, and many performance testing tools. Some of these tools are third-party tools and have a cost-heavy license for the company to manage. For small start-up companies, these license costs can be unbearable. We analyze a tool to make the process easier and more cost effective.

About the Tool

The tool can have two parts. One part can be making a main interface web page where developers/testers can fill in the details and start testing. The other part can be the onboarding template page, where the team can onboard new applications, templates, and stacks so that it appears on the main interface page.

#performance testing #testing tool #performance test tools #testing

Mikel  Okuneva

Mikel Okuneva

1596793726

Where To Learn Test Programming — July 2020 Edition

What do you do when you have lots of free time on your hands? Why not learn test programming strategies and approaches?

When you’re looking for places to learn test programming, Test Automation University has you covered. From API testing through visual validation, you can hone your skills and learn new approaches on TAU.

We introduced five new TAU courses from April through June, and each of them can help you expand your knowledge, learn a new approach, and improve your craft as a test automation engineer. They are:

These courses add to the other three courses we introduced in January through March 2020:

  • IntelliJ for Test Automation Engineers (3 hrs 41 min)
  • Cucumber with JavaScript (1 hr 22 min)
  • Python Programming (2 hrs)

Each of these courses can give you a new set of skills.

Let’s look at each in a little detail.

Mobile Automation With Appium in JavaScript

Orane Findley teaches Mobile Automation with Appium in JavaScript. Orane walks through all the basics of Appium, starting with what it is and where it runs.

javascript

“Appium is an open-source tool for automating native, web, and hybrid applications on different platforms.”

In the introduction, Orane describes the course parts:

  • Setup and Dependencies — installing Appium and setting up your first project
  • Working with elements by finding them, sending values, clicking, and submitting
  • Creating sessions, changing screen orientations, and taking screenshots
  • Timing, including TimeOuts and Implicit Waits
  • Collecting attributes and data from an element
  • Selecting and using element states
  • Reviewing everything to make it all make sense

The first chapter, broken into five parts, gets your system ready for the rest of the course. You’ll download and install a Java Developer Kit, a stable version of Node.js, Android Studio and Emulator (for a mobile device emulator), Visual Studio Code for an IDE, Appium Server, and a sample Appium Android Package Kit. If you get into trouble, you can use the Test Automation University Slack channel to get help from Orane. Each subchapter contains the links to get to the proper software. Finally, Orane has you customize your configuration for the course project.

Chapter 2 deals with elements and screen interactions for your app. You can find elements on the page, interact with those elements, and scroll the page to make other elements visible. Orane breaks the chapter into three distinct subchapters so you can become competent with each part of finding, scrolling, and interacting with the app. The quiz comes at the end of the third subchapter.

The remaining chapters each deal with specific bullets listed above: sessions and screen capture, timing, element attributes, and using element states. The final summary chapter ensures you have internalized the key takeaways from the course. Each of these chapters includes its quiz.

When you complete this course successfully, you will have both a certificate of completion and the code infrastructure available on your system to start testing mobile apps using Appium.

Selenium WebDriver With Python

Andrew Knight, who blogs as The Automation Panda, teaches the course on Selenium WebDriver with Python. As Andrew points out, Python has become a popular language for test automation. If you don’t know Python at all, he points you to Jess Ingrassellino’s great course, Python for Test Programming, also on Test Automation University.

Se

In the first chapter, Andrew has you write your first test. Not in Python, but Gherkin. If you have never used Gherkin syntax, it helps you structure your tests in pseudocode that you can translate into any language of your choice. Andrew points out that it’s important to write your test steps before you write test code — and Gherkin makes this process straightforward.

first test case

The second chapter goes through setting up a pytest, the test framework Andrew uses. He assumes you already have Python 3.8 installed. Depending on your machine, you may need to do some work (Macs come with Python 2.7.16 installed, which is old and won’t work. Andrew also goes through the pip package manager to install pipenv. He gives you a GitHub link to his test code for the project. And, finally, he creates a test using the Gherkin codes as comments to show you how a test runs in pytest.

In the third chapter, you set up Selenium Webdriver to work with specific browsers, then create your test fixture in the pytest. Andrew reminds you to download the appropriate browser driver for the browser you want to test — for example, chromedriver to drive Chrome and geckodriver to drive Firefox. Once you use pipenv to install Selenium, you begin your test fixture. One thing to remember is to call an explicit quit for your webdriver after a test.

Chapter 4 goes through page objects, and how you abstract page object details to simplify your test structure. Chapter 5 goes through element locator structures and how to use these in Python. And, in Chapter 6, Andrew goes through some common webdriver calls and how to use them in your tests. These first six chapters cover the basics of testing with Python and Selenium.

Now that you have the basics down, the final three chapters review some advanced ideas: testing with multiple browsers, handling race conditions, and running your tests in parallel. This course gives you specific skills around Python and Selenium on top of what you can get from the Python for Test Programming course.

#tutorial #performance #testing #automation #test automation #automated testing #visual testing #visual testing best practices #testing tutorial