Monty  Boehm

Monty Boehm

1621670940

4 Git Pro Tips You Should Start Doing

You and your colleagues will love you more.

If you are here, you know what you are doing, so let’s cut to the chase.

Never push broken code to main or master. Always use a branch to tweak and test your code.

Do you know how annoying it is to clone a repo and it fails to run on the first try? It is such a mood breaker. Some people keep pushing to master or the main branch even though they have not tested the code tweak properly. Don’t be those people.

You can create a branch from the master should you need to change the code. For example, name your branch john_tweak.

git branch john_tweak

Don’t forget to check out your newly created branch.

git checkout john_tweak

Now you can modify/add/commit your code however you want.

Once the code is done and properly tested, you can merge john_tweak with master branch. You will have some conflicts if the master branch is edited. Resolve them, and then you can push.

git checkout master
git merge john_tweak
git push origin master

#technology #programming #code #git

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4 Git Pro Tips You Should Start Doing
Ray  Patel

Ray Patel

1619518440

top 30 Python Tips and Tricks for Beginners

Welcome to my Blog , In this article, you are going to learn the top 10 python tips and tricks.

1) swap two numbers.

2) Reversing a string in Python.

3) Create a single string from all the elements in list.

4) Chaining Of Comparison Operators.

5) Print The File Path Of Imported Modules.

6) Return Multiple Values From Functions.

7) Find The Most Frequent Value In A List.

8) Check The Memory Usage Of An Object.

#python #python hacks tricks #python learning tips #python programming tricks #python tips #python tips and tricks #python tips and tricks advanced #python tips and tricks for beginners #python tips tricks and techniques #python tutorial #tips and tricks in python #tips to learn python #top 30 python tips and tricks for beginners

Monty  Boehm

Monty Boehm

1640622240

Automatically Tag A Branch with The Next Semantic Version Tag

Auto-Tag

PyPI PyPI - Implementation PyPI - Python Version codecov PyPI - License

Automatically tag a branch with the next semantic version tag.

This is useful if you want to generate tags every time something is merged. Microservice and GitOps repository are good candidates for this type of action.

TOC

How to install

~ $ pip install auto-tag

To see if it works, you can try

~ $ auto-tag  -h
usage: auto-tag [-h] [-b BRANCH] [-r REPO]
                [-u [UPSTREAM_REMOTE [UPSTREAM_REMOTE ...]]]
                [-l {CRITICAL,FATAL,ERROR,WARN,WARNING,INFO,DEBUG,NOTSET}]
                [--name NAME] [--email EMAIL] [-c CONFIG]
                [--skip-tag-if-one-already-present] [--append-v-to-tag]
                [--tag-search-strategy {biggest-tag-in-repo,biggest-tag-in-branch,latest-tag-in-repo,latest-tag-in-branch}]

.....

How it Works

The flow is as follows:

  • figure our repository based on the argument
  • load detectors from file if specified (-c option), if none specified load default ones (see Detectors)
  • check for the last tag (depending on the search strategy see Search Strategy
  • look at all commits done after that tag on a specific branch (or from the start of the repository if no tag is found)
  • apply the detector (see Detectors) on each commit and save the highest change detected (PATH, MINOR, MAJOR)
  • bump the last tag with the approbate change and apply it using the default git author in the system or a specific one (see Git Author)
  • if an upstream was specified push the tag to that upstream

Examples

Here we can see in commit 2245d5d that it stats with feature( so the latest know tag (0.2.1) was bumped to 0.3.0

~ $ git log --oneline
2245d5d (HEAD -> master) feature(component) commit #4
939322f commit #3
9ef3be6 (tag: 0.2.1) commit #2
0ee81b0 commit #1
~ $ auto-tag
2019-08-31 14:10:24,626: Start tagging <git.Repo "/Users/matei/git/test-auto-tag-branch/.git">
2019-08-31 14:10:24,649: Bumping tag 0.2.1 -> 0.3.0
2019-08-31 14:10:24,658: No push remote was specified
~ $ git log --oneline
2245d5d (HEAD -> master, tag: 0.3.0) feature(component) commit #4
939322f commit #3
9ef3be6 (tag: 0.2.1) commit #2
0ee81b0 commit #1

In this example we can see 2245d5deb5d97d288b7926be62d051b7eed35c98 introducing a feature that will trigger a MINOR change but we can also see 0de444695e3208b74d0b3ed7fd20fd0be4b2992e having a BREAKING_CHANGE that will introduce a MAJOR bump, this is the reason the tag moved from 0.2.1 to 1.0.0

~ $ git log
commit 0de444695e3208b74d0b3ed7fd20fd0be4b2992e (HEAD -> master)
Author: Matei-Marius Micu <micumatei@gmail.com>
Date:   Fri Aug 30 21:58:01 2019 +0300

    fix(something) ....

    BREAKING_CHANGE: this must trigger major version bump

commit 65bf4b17669ea52f84fd1dfa4e4feadbc299a80e
Author: Matei-Marius Micu <micumatei@gmail.com>
Date:   Fri Aug 30 21:57:47 2019 +0300

    fix(something) ....

commit 2245d5deb5d97d288b7926be62d051b7eed35c98
Author: Matei-Marius Micu <micumatei@gmail.com>
Date:   Fri Aug 30 19:52:10 2019 +0300

    feature(component) commit #4

commit 939322f1efaa1c07b7ed33f2923526f327975cfc
Author: Matei-Marius Micu <micumatei@gmail.com>
Date:   Fri Aug 30 19:51:24 2019 +0300

    commit #3

commit 9ef3be64c803d7d8d3b80596485eac18e80cb89d (tag: 0.2.1)
Author: Matei-Marius Micu <micumatei@gmail.com>
Date:   Fri Aug 30 19:51:18 2019 +0300

    commit #2

commit 0ee81b0bed209941720ee602f76341bcb115b87d
Author: Matei-Marius Micu <micumatei@gmail.com>
Date:   Fri Aug 30 19:50:25 2019 +0300

    commit #1
~ $ auto-tag
2019-08-31 14:10:24,626: Start tagging <git.Repo "/Users/matei/git/test-auto-tag-branch/.git">
2019-08-31 14:10:24,649: Bumping tag 0.2.1 -> 1.0.0
2019-08-31 14:10:24,658: No push remote was specified
~ $ git log
commit 0de444695e3208b74d0b3ed7fd20fd0be4b2992e (HEAD -> master, tag: 1.0.0)
Author: Matei-Marius Micu <micumatei@gmail.com>
Date:   Fri Aug 30 21:58:01 2019 +0300

    fix(something) ....

    BREAKING_CHANGE: this must trigger major version bump

commit 65bf4b17669ea52f84fd1dfa4e4feadbc299a80e
Author: Matei-Marius Micu <micumatei@gmail.com>
Date:   Fri Aug 30 21:57:47 2019 +0300

    fix(something) ....

commit 2245d5deb5d97d288b7926be62d051b7eed35c98
Author: Matei-Marius Micu <micumatei@gmail.com>
Date:   Fri Aug 30 19:52:10 2019 +0300

    feature(component) commit #4

commit 939322f1efaa1c07b7ed33f2923526f327975cfc
Author: Matei-Marius Micu <micumatei@gmail.com>
Date:   Fri Aug 30 19:51:24 2019 +0300

    commit #3

commit 9ef3be64c803d7d8d3b80596485eac18e80cb89d (tag: 0.2.1)
Author: Matei-Marius Micu <micumatei@gmail.com>
Date:   Fri Aug 30 19:51:18 2019 +0300

    commit #2

commit 0ee81b0bed209941720ee602f76341bcb115b87d
Author: Matei-Marius Micu <micumatei@gmail.com>
Date:   Fri Aug 30 19:50:25 2019 +0300

    commit #1

Detectors

If you want to detect what commit enforces a specific tag bump(PATH, MINOR, MAJOR) you can configure detectors. They are configured in a yaml file that looks like this:

detectors:

  check_for_feature_heading:
    type: CommitMessageHeadStartsWithDetector
    produce_type_change: MINOR
    params:
      pattern: 'feature'


  check_for_breaking_change:
    type: CommitMessageContainsDetector
    produce_type_change: MAJOR
    params:
      pattern: 'BREAKING_CHANGE'
      case_sensitive: false

Here is the default configuration for detectors if none is specified. We can see we have two detectors check_for_feature_heading and check_for_breaking_change, with a type, what change they will trigger and specific parameters for each one. This configuration will do the following:

  • if the commit message starts with feature( a MINOR change will BE triggered
  • if the commit has BREAKIN_CHANGE in the message a MAJOR change will be triggered The bump on the tag will be based on the higher priority found.

The type and produce_type_change parameters are required params is specific to every detector.

To pass the file to the process just use the -c CLI parameter.

Currently we support the following triggers:

  • CommitMessageHeadStartsWithDetector
    • Parameters:
      • case_sensitive of type bool, if the comparison is case sensitive
      • strip of type bool, if we strip the spaces from the commit message
      • pattern of type string, what pattern is searched at the start of the commit message
  • CommitMessageContainsDetector
    • case_sensitive of type bool, if the comparison is case sensitive
    • strip of type bool, if we strip the spaces from the commit message
    • pattern of type string, what pattern is searched in the body of the commit message
  • CommitMessageMatchesRegexDetector
    • strip of type bool, if we strip the spaces from the commit message
    • pattern of type string, what regex pattern to match against the commit message

The regex detector is the most powerful one.

Git Author

When creating and tag we need to specify a git author, if a global one is not set (or if we want to make this one with a specific user), we have the option to specify one. The following options will add a temporary config to this repository(local config). After the tag was created it will restore the existing config (if any was present)

  --name NAME           User name used for creating git objects.If not
                        specified the system one will be used.
  --email EMAIL         Email name used for creating git objects.If not
                        specified the system one will be used.

If another user interacts with git while this process is taking place it will use the temporary config, but we assume we are run in a CI pipeline and this is the only process interacting with git.

Search Strategy

If you want to bump a tag first you need to find the last one, we have a few implementations to search for the last tag that can be configured with --tag-search-strategy CLI option.

  • biggest-tag-in-repo consider all tags in the repository as semantic versions and pick the biggest one
  • biggest-tag-in-branch consider all tags on the specified branch as semantic versions and pick the biggest one
  • latest-tag-in-repo compare commit date for each commit that has a tag in the repository and take the latest
  • latest-tag-in-branch compare commit date for each commit that has a tag one the specifid branch and take the latest

Download Details: 
Author: Mateimicu
Source Code: https://github.com/mateimicu/auto-tag 
License: View license

#git #github 

Madyson  Reilly

Madyson Reilly

1604109000

Best Practices for Using Git

Git has become ubiquitous as the preferred version control system (VCS) used by developers. Using Git adds immense value especially for engineering teams where several developers work together since it becomes critical to have a system of integrating everyone’s code reliably.

But with every powerful tool, especially one that involves collaboration with others, it is better to establish conventions to follow lest we shoot ourselves in the foot.

At DeepSource, we’ve put together some guiding principles for our own team that make working with a VCS like Git easier. Here are 5 simple rules you can follow:

1. Make Clean, Single-Purpose Commits

Oftentimes programmers working on something get sidetracked into doing too many things when working on one particular thing — like when you are trying to fix one particular bug and you spot another one, and you can’t resist the urge to fix that as well. And another one. Soon, it snowballs and you end up with so many changes all going together in one commit.

This is problematic, and it is better to keep commits as small and focused as possible for many reasons, including:

  • It makes it easier for other people in the team to look at your change, making code reviews more efficient.
  • If the commit has to be rolled back completely, it’s far easier to do so.
  • It’s straightforward to track these changes with your ticketing system.

Additionally, it helps you mentally parse changes you’ve made using git log.

#open source #git #git basics #git tools #git best practices #git tutorials #git commit

7 Best Practices in GIT for Your Code Quality

There is no doubt that Git plays a significant role in software development. It allows developers to work on the same code base at the same time. Still, developers struggle for code quality. Why? They fail to follow git best practices. In this post, I will explain seven core best practices of Git and a Bonus Section.

1. Atomic Commit

Committing something to Git means that you have changed your code and want to save these changes as a new trusted version.

Version control systems will not limit you in how you commit your code.

  • You can commit 1000 changes in one single commit.
  • Commit all the dll and other dependencies
  • Or you can check in broken code to your repository.

But is it good? Not quite.

Because you are compromising code quality, and it will take more time to review codeSo overall, team productivity will be reduced. The best practice is to make an atomic commit.

When you do an atomic commit, you’re committing only one change. It might be across multiple files, but it’s one single change.

2. Clarity About What You Can (& Can’t) Commit

Many developers make some changes, then commit, then push. And I have seen many repositories with unwanted files like dll, pdf, etc.

You can ask two questions to yourself, before check-in your code into the repository

  1. Are you suppose to check-in all these files?
  2. Are they part of your source code?

You can simply use the .gitignore file to avoid unwanted files in the repository. If you are working on more then one repo, it’s easy to use a global .gitignore file (without adding or pushing). And .gitignore file adds clarity and helps you to keep your code clean. What you can commit, and it will automatically ignore the unwanted files like autogenerated files like .dll and .class, etc.

#git basics #git command #git ignore #git best practices #git tutorial for beginners #git tutorials

Ian  Robinson

Ian Robinson

1623993300

4 Key Tips to Get Started With Data Democratization

Data democratization means the cycle where one can utilize the data whenever to make decisions.

Business data is more bountiful than ever. Regardless of whether this data is gathered directly or bought from a third-party or syndicated source, it must be appropriately managed to bring organizations the most worth.

To achieve this goal, organizations are putting resources into data infrastructure and platforms, for example, data lakes and data warehouses. This investment is crucial to harnessing insights, yet it’s only essential for the solution.

Organizations are quickly embracing data-driven decision making processes. With insight-driven organizations growing multiple times quicker than their competitors, they don’t have a choice.

The gauntlet has adequately been tossed down. Either give admittance to significant data for your business, or join the developing memorial park of dinosaur organizations, incapable or reluctant to adapt to the cutting-edge digital economy

Self-service BI and analytics solutions can address this challenge by empowering business owners to access data straightforwardly and gain the insights they need. Nonetheless, just offering Self-service BI doesn’t ensure that an organization will become insights-rich and that key partners will be able to follow up on insights without contribution from technical team members.

The progress to genuinely insights-driven decisions requires a purposeful leadership effort, investment in the correct devices, and employee empowerment with the goal that leaders across capacities can counsel data independently prior to acting.

As such, organizations must take a stab at data democratization: opening up admittance to data and analytics among non-technical people without technical guards. In data democratization, the user experience must line up with the practices and needs of business owners to guarantee maximum adoption.

Data democratization means the process where one can utilize the data whenever to make decisions. In the company, everybody profits by having snappy admittance to data and the capacity to make decisions instantly.

Deploying data democratization requires data program to be self-aware; that is, with more prominent broad admittance to data, protocols should be set up to guarantee that users presented to certain data comprehend what it is they’re seeing — that nothing is misconstrued when deciphered and that overall data security itself is kept up, as more noteworthy availability to data may likewise effectively build risk to data integrity. These protections, while vital, are far exceeded by the perception of and data contribution from all edges of a company. With support empowered and encouraged across a company’s ecosystem,further knowledge becomes conceivable, driving advancement and better performance.

#big data #data management #latest news #4 key tips to get started with data democratization #data democratization #key tips to get started with data democratization