Animating list reordering with React Hooks

A little while ago I was given a cool design for an Instagram story styled bubble component where each bubble would smoothly slide into its new position when we got its new order from the API.

Image for post

While it can be straightforward to do a whole load of animations and transitions with CSS, it took me a while to find an example of animating the reordering of list items, especially with React. Since I’ve also started to get used to the concepts of React Hooks I wanted to use them to implement this animation too.

I found this difficult to do using React hooks because my component would automatically rerender, in its new order, when it got new data. I was trying to hook into the moment before rerendering to smoothly transition from one state to another. Without the componentWillReceiveProps function call from the class components, this was hard to do.

I was under the (incorrect) assumption that there would be loads of React hooks examples out in the wild. I honestly just wanted a copypasta solution that I wouldn’t have to tweak too much 👀. I also didn’t want to bring in some huge, usually overly flexible package to reorder one small thing. I did come across a great post by Joshua Comeau (linked below). It explains how to do exactly what I needed, but with class components. With React hooks I needed to re-think some of the concepts to get it to work, but I’ve based the majority of this work on that post.

What we want to happen:

  1. Keep an eye out for when our element list is going to change
  2. When it changes we want to calculate the previous positions and the new positions of each element in the list before the DOM updates
  3. Also before the DOM updates with the new order of the list we want to “pause” the update and show a smooth transition of each item in the list from its old position to its new position

Image for post

Image for post

Let’s start with a parent component that just renders the children that is passed into it, AnimateBubbles:

import React from "react";

	const AnimateBubbles = ({ children }) => {
	  return children;
	};

	export default AnimateBubbles;
view raw
AnimateReordering_AnimateBubbles-initial.jsx hosted with ❤ by GitHub

Then we can use that component by rendering our items inside of it. In my case I’ve created a Bubble component that adds the styles to make each image a circle, the full code is here. The Bubble component also forwards the ref onto the DOM element. This is important as we can use the ref to find where the element is rendered in the DOM, then we can calculate its position. Another important prop is the key, this is not only needed for React when mapping over elements, but we can also use later to uniquely identify each item and match its old and new positions in the DOM.

#react-hook #animation #uselayouteffect #react

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Animating list reordering with React Hooks
Autumn  Blick

Autumn Blick

1598839687

How native is React Native? | React Native vs Native App Development

If you are undertaking a mobile app development for your start-up or enterprise, you are likely wondering whether to use React Native. As a popular development framework, React Native helps you to develop near-native mobile apps. However, you are probably also wondering how close you can get to a native app by using React Native. How native is React Native?

In the article, we discuss the similarities between native mobile development and development using React Native. We also touch upon where they differ and how to bridge the gaps. Read on.

A brief introduction to React Native

Let’s briefly set the context first. We will briefly touch upon what React Native is and how it differs from earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is a popular JavaScript framework that Facebook has created. You can use this open-source framework to code natively rendering Android and iOS mobile apps. You can use it to develop web apps too.

Facebook has developed React Native based on React, its JavaScript library. The first release of React Native came in March 2015. At the time of writing this article, the latest stable release of React Native is 0.62.0, and it was released in March 2020.

Although relatively new, React Native has acquired a high degree of popularity. The “Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2019” report identifies it as the 8th most loved framework. Facebook, Walmart, and Bloomberg are some of the top companies that use React Native.

The popularity of React Native comes from its advantages. Some of its advantages are as follows:

  • Performance: It delivers optimal performance.
  • Cross-platform development: You can develop both Android and iOS apps with it. The reuse of code expedites development and reduces costs.
  • UI design: React Native enables you to design simple and responsive UI for your mobile app.
  • 3rd party plugins: This framework supports 3rd party plugins.
  • Developer community: A vibrant community of developers support React Native.

Why React Native is fundamentally different from earlier hybrid frameworks

Are you wondering whether React Native is just another of those hybrid frameworks like Ionic or Cordova? It’s not! React Native is fundamentally different from these earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is very close to native. Consider the following aspects as described on the React Native website:

  • Access to many native platforms features: The primitives of React Native render to native platform UI. This means that your React Native app will use many native platform APIs as native apps would do.
  • Near-native user experience: React Native provides several native components, and these are platform agnostic.
  • The ease of accessing native APIs: React Native uses a declarative UI paradigm. This enables React Native to interact easily with native platform APIs since React Native wraps existing native code.

Due to these factors, React Native offers many more advantages compared to those earlier hybrid frameworks. We now review them.

#android app #frontend #ios app #mobile app development #benefits of react native #is react native good for mobile app development #native vs #pros and cons of react native #react mobile development #react native development #react native experience #react native framework #react native ios vs android #react native pros and cons #react native vs android #react native vs native #react native vs native performance #react vs native #why react native #why use react native

What are hooks in React JS? - INFO AT ONE

In this article, you will learn what are hooks in React JS? and when to use react hooks? React JS is developed by Facebook in the year 2013. There are many students and the new developers who have confusion between react and hooks in react. Well, it is not different, react is a programming language and hooks is a function which is used in react programming language.
Read More:- https://infoatone.com/what-are-hooks-in-react-js/

#react #hooks in react #react hooks example #react js projects for beginners #what are hooks in react js? #when to use react hooks

Were  Joyce

Were Joyce

1624374840

Animated List Reordering in React Native — Secrets Revealed

After two long hours of Google searches it became quite clear that animated re-ordering of a list in React Native is uncharted territory. Naturally, what comes to my mind, is that this is a great opportunity for an open-source contribution! Although, in the end it was achievable thanks to open-source.

Whenever I encounter a problem, the first things I search for is generic solutions, so in this case we are trying to build an animated re-order in React Native, so let’s start with React. There was a React library for this called react-flip-move, but upon inspection, it looked as if the React Native support was non-existent.

I decided that to build this, I needed to create a custom hook which allowed sorting of list in React Native, powered by the Animated API. The solutions was broken down into three parts:

  • Calculate the height and y position of each item in the list
  • Figure out the items which have switched positions
  • Re-order the items with the Animated API

#react-native #sortable-list #animatedlist #react-spring #flatlist #animated list reordering in react native — secrets revealed

Animating list reordering with React Hooks

A little while ago I was given a cool design for an Instagram story styled bubble component where each bubble would smoothly slide into its new position when we got its new order from the API.

Image for post

While it can be straightforward to do a whole load of animations and transitions with CSS, it took me a while to find an example of animating the reordering of list items, especially with React. Since I’ve also started to get used to the concepts of React Hooks I wanted to use them to implement this animation too.

I found this difficult to do using React hooks because my component would automatically rerender, in its new order, when it got new data. I was trying to hook into the moment before rerendering to smoothly transition from one state to another. Without the componentWillReceiveProps function call from the class components, this was hard to do.

I was under the (incorrect) assumption that there would be loads of React hooks examples out in the wild. I honestly just wanted a copypasta solution that I wouldn’t have to tweak too much 👀. I also didn’t want to bring in some huge, usually overly flexible package to reorder one small thing. I did come across a great post by Joshua Comeau (linked below). It explains how to do exactly what I needed, but with class components. With React hooks I needed to re-think some of the concepts to get it to work, but I’ve based the majority of this work on that post.

What we want to happen:

  1. Keep an eye out for when our element list is going to change
  2. When it changes we want to calculate the previous positions and the new positions of each element in the list before the DOM updates
  3. Also before the DOM updates with the new order of the list we want to “pause” the update and show a smooth transition of each item in the list from its old position to its new position

Image for post

Image for post

Let’s start with a parent component that just renders the children that is passed into it, AnimateBubbles:

import React from "react";

	const AnimateBubbles = ({ children }) => {
	  return children;
	};

	export default AnimateBubbles;
view raw
AnimateReordering_AnimateBubbles-initial.jsx hosted with ❤ by GitHub

Then we can use that component by rendering our items inside of it. In my case I’ve created a Bubble component that adds the styles to make each image a circle, the full code is here. The Bubble component also forwards the ref onto the DOM element. This is important as we can use the ref to find where the element is rendered in the DOM, then we can calculate its position. Another important prop is the key, this is not only needed for React when mapping over elements, but we can also use later to uniquely identify each item and match its old and new positions in the DOM.

#react-hook #animation #uselayouteffect #react

Hayden Slater

1599277908

Validating React Forms With React-Hook-Form

Validating inputs is very often required. For example, when you want to make sure two passwords inputs are the same, an email input should in fact be an email or that the input is not too long. This is can be easily done using React Hook From. In this article, I will show you how.

Required Fields

The most simple, yet very common, validation is to make sure that an input component contains input from the user. React Hook Form basic concept is to register input tags to the form by passing register() to the tag’s ref attribute. As we can see here:

#react-native #react #react-hook-form #react-hook