Next.js - NavLink Component Example with Active CSS Class

This is a quick post to show how to create a custom NavLink component in Next.js that extends the built-in Link component to add the CSS className "active" when the href attribute matches the current URL. It’s based on the nav link component from a Next.js CRUD example I posted recently, for full details including a working demo see Next.js 10 - CRUD Example with React Hook Form.

Next.js Custom NavLink Component

This is the NavLink component, by default the "active" class is added when the href matches the start of the URL pathname, use the exact property to change it to an exact match with the whole URL pathname.

import { useRouter } from 'next/router';
import Link from 'next/link';
import PropTypes from 'prop-types';

export { NavLink };

NavLink.propTypes = {
    href: PropTypes.string.isRequired,
    exact: PropTypes.bool
};

NavLink.defaultProps = {
    exact: false
};

function NavLink({ href, exact, children, ...props }) {
    const { pathname } = useRouter();
    const isActive = exact ? pathname === href : pathname.startsWith(href);

    if (isActive) {
        props.className += ' active';
    }

    return (
        <Link href={href}>
            <a {...props}>
                {children}
            </a>
        </Link>
    );
}

#next.js #css #navlink

What is GEEK

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Next.js - NavLink Component Example with Active CSS Class
Lawrence  Lesch

Lawrence Lesch

1677668905

TS-mockito: Mocking Library for TypeScript

TS-mockito

Mocking library for TypeScript inspired by http://mockito.org/

1.x to 2.x migration guide

1.x to 2.x migration guide

Main features

  • Strongly typed
  • IDE autocomplete
  • Mock creation (mock) (also abstract classes) #example
  • Spying on real objects (spy) #example
  • Changing mock behavior (when) via:
  • Checking if methods were called with given arguments (verify)
    • anything, notNull, anyString, anyOfClass etc. - for more flexible comparision
    • once, twice, times, atLeast etc. - allows call count verification #example
    • calledBefore, calledAfter - allows call order verification #example
  • Resetting mock (reset, resetCalls) #example, #example
  • Capturing arguments passed to method (capture) #example
  • Recording multiple behaviors #example
  • Readable error messages (ex. 'Expected "convertNumberToString(strictEqual(3))" to be called 2 time(s). But has been called 1 time(s).')

Installation

npm install ts-mockito --save-dev

Usage

Basics

// Creating mock
let mockedFoo:Foo = mock(Foo);

// Getting instance from mock
let foo:Foo = instance(mockedFoo);

// Using instance in source code
foo.getBar(3);
foo.getBar(5);

// Explicit, readable verification
verify(mockedFoo.getBar(3)).called();
verify(mockedFoo.getBar(anything())).called();

Stubbing method calls

// Creating mock
let mockedFoo:Foo = mock(Foo);

// stub method before execution
when(mockedFoo.getBar(3)).thenReturn('three');

// Getting instance
let foo:Foo = instance(mockedFoo);

// prints three
console.log(foo.getBar(3));

// prints null, because "getBar(999)" was not stubbed
console.log(foo.getBar(999));

Stubbing getter value

// Creating mock
let mockedFoo:Foo = mock(Foo);

// stub getter before execution
when(mockedFoo.sampleGetter).thenReturn('three');

// Getting instance
let foo:Foo = instance(mockedFoo);

// prints three
console.log(foo.sampleGetter);

Stubbing property values that have no getters

Syntax is the same as with getter values.

Please note, that stubbing properties that don't have getters only works if Proxy object is available (ES6).

Call count verification

// Creating mock
let mockedFoo:Foo = mock(Foo);

// Getting instance
let foo:Foo = instance(mockedFoo);

// Some calls
foo.getBar(1);
foo.getBar(2);
foo.getBar(2);
foo.getBar(3);

// Call count verification
verify(mockedFoo.getBar(1)).once();               // was called with arg === 1 only once
verify(mockedFoo.getBar(2)).twice();              // was called with arg === 2 exactly two times
verify(mockedFoo.getBar(between(2, 3))).thrice(); // was called with arg between 2-3 exactly three times
verify(mockedFoo.getBar(anyNumber()).times(4);    // was called with any number arg exactly four times
verify(mockedFoo.getBar(2)).atLeast(2);           // was called with arg === 2 min two times
verify(mockedFoo.getBar(anything())).atMost(4);   // was called with any argument max four times
verify(mockedFoo.getBar(4)).never();              // was never called with arg === 4

Call order verification

// Creating mock
let mockedFoo:Foo = mock(Foo);
let mockedBar:Bar = mock(Bar);

// Getting instance
let foo:Foo = instance(mockedFoo);
let bar:Bar = instance(mockedBar);

// Some calls
foo.getBar(1);
bar.getFoo(2);

// Call order verification
verify(mockedFoo.getBar(1)).calledBefore(mockedBar.getFoo(2));    // foo.getBar(1) has been called before bar.getFoo(2)
verify(mockedBar.getFoo(2)).calledAfter(mockedFoo.getBar(1));    // bar.getFoo(2) has been called before foo.getBar(1)
verify(mockedFoo.getBar(1)).calledBefore(mockedBar.getFoo(999999));    // throws error (mockedBar.getFoo(999999) has never been called)

Throwing errors

let mockedFoo:Foo = mock(Foo);

when(mockedFoo.getBar(10)).thenThrow(new Error('fatal error'));

let foo:Foo = instance(mockedFoo);
try {
    foo.getBar(10);
} catch (error:Error) {
    console.log(error.message); // 'fatal error'
}

Custom function

You can also stub method with your own implementation

let mockedFoo:Foo = mock(Foo);
let foo:Foo = instance(mockedFoo);

when(mockedFoo.sumTwoNumbers(anyNumber(), anyNumber())).thenCall((arg1:number, arg2:number) => {
    return arg1 * arg2; 
});

// prints '50' because we've changed sum method implementation to multiply!
console.log(foo.sumTwoNumbers(5, 10));

Resolving / rejecting promises

You can also stub method to resolve / reject promise

let mockedFoo:Foo = mock(Foo);

when(mockedFoo.fetchData("a")).thenResolve({id: "a", value: "Hello world"});
when(mockedFoo.fetchData("b")).thenReject(new Error("b does not exist"));

Resetting mock calls

You can reset just mock call counter

// Creating mock
let mockedFoo:Foo = mock(Foo);

// Getting instance
let foo:Foo = instance(mockedFoo);

// Some calls
foo.getBar(1);
foo.getBar(1);
verify(mockedFoo.getBar(1)).twice();      // getBar with arg "1" has been called twice

// Reset mock
resetCalls(mockedFoo);

// Call count verification
verify(mockedFoo.getBar(1)).never();      // has never been called after reset

You can also reset calls of multiple mocks at once resetCalls(firstMock, secondMock, thirdMock)

Resetting mock

Or reset mock call counter with all stubs

// Creating mock
let mockedFoo:Foo = mock(Foo);
when(mockedFoo.getBar(1)).thenReturn("one").

// Getting instance
let foo:Foo = instance(mockedFoo);

// Some calls
console.log(foo.getBar(1));               // "one" - as defined in stub
console.log(foo.getBar(1));               // "one" - as defined in stub
verify(mockedFoo.getBar(1)).twice();      // getBar with arg "1" has been called twice

// Reset mock
reset(mockedFoo);

// Call count verification
verify(mockedFoo.getBar(1)).never();      // has never been called after reset
console.log(foo.getBar(1));               // null - previously added stub has been removed

You can also reset multiple mocks at once reset(firstMock, secondMock, thirdMock)

Capturing method arguments

let mockedFoo:Foo = mock(Foo);
let foo:Foo = instance(mockedFoo);

// Call method
foo.sumTwoNumbers(1, 2);

// Check first arg captor values
const [firstArg, secondArg] = capture(mockedFoo.sumTwoNumbers).last();
console.log(firstArg);    // prints 1
console.log(secondArg);    // prints 2

You can also get other calls using first(), second(), byCallIndex(3) and more...

Recording multiple behaviors

You can set multiple returning values for same matching values

const mockedFoo:Foo = mock(Foo);

when(mockedFoo.getBar(anyNumber())).thenReturn('one').thenReturn('two').thenReturn('three');

const foo:Foo = instance(mockedFoo);

console.log(foo.getBar(1));    // one
console.log(foo.getBar(1));    // two
console.log(foo.getBar(1));    // three
console.log(foo.getBar(1));    // three - last defined behavior will be repeated infinitely

Another example with specific values

let mockedFoo:Foo = mock(Foo);

when(mockedFoo.getBar(1)).thenReturn('one').thenReturn('another one');
when(mockedFoo.getBar(2)).thenReturn('two');

let foo:Foo = instance(mockedFoo);

console.log(foo.getBar(1));    // one
console.log(foo.getBar(2));    // two
console.log(foo.getBar(1));    // another one
console.log(foo.getBar(1));    // another one - this is last defined behavior for arg '1' so it will be repeated
console.log(foo.getBar(2));    // two
console.log(foo.getBar(2));    // two - this is last defined behavior for arg '2' so it will be repeated

Short notation:

const mockedFoo:Foo = mock(Foo);

// You can specify return values as multiple thenReturn args
when(mockedFoo.getBar(anyNumber())).thenReturn('one', 'two', 'three');

const foo:Foo = instance(mockedFoo);

console.log(foo.getBar(1));    // one
console.log(foo.getBar(1));    // two
console.log(foo.getBar(1));    // three
console.log(foo.getBar(1));    // three - last defined behavior will be repeated infinity

Possible errors:

const mockedFoo:Foo = mock(Foo);

// When multiple matchers, matches same result:
when(mockedFoo.getBar(anyNumber())).thenReturn('one');
when(mockedFoo.getBar(3)).thenReturn('one');

const foo:Foo = instance(mockedFoo);
foo.getBar(3); // MultipleMatchersMatchSameStubError will be thrown, two matchers match same method call

Mocking interfaces

You can mock interfaces too, just instead of passing type to mock function, set mock function generic type Mocking interfaces requires Proxy implementation

let mockedFoo:Foo = mock<FooInterface>(); // instead of mock(FooInterface)
const foo: SampleGeneric<FooInterface> = instance(mockedFoo);

Mocking types

You can mock abstract classes

const mockedFoo: SampleAbstractClass = mock(SampleAbstractClass);
const foo: SampleAbstractClass = instance(mockedFoo);

You can also mock generic classes, but note that generic type is just needed by mock type definition

const mockedFoo: SampleGeneric<SampleInterface> = mock(SampleGeneric);
const foo: SampleGeneric<SampleInterface> = instance(mockedFoo);

Spying on real objects

You can partially mock an existing instance:

const foo: Foo = new Foo();
const spiedFoo = spy(foo);

when(spiedFoo.getBar(3)).thenReturn('one');

console.log(foo.getBar(3)); // 'one'
console.log(foo.getBaz()); // call to a real method

You can spy on plain objects too:

const foo = { bar: () => 42 };
const spiedFoo = spy(foo);

foo.bar();

console.log(capture(spiedFoo.bar).last()); // [42] 

Thanks


Download Details:

Author: NagRock
Source Code: https://github.com/NagRock/ts-mockito 
License: MIT license

#typescript #testing #mock 

NBB: Ad-hoc CLJS Scripting on Node.js

Nbb

Not babashka. Node.js babashka!?

Ad-hoc CLJS scripting on Node.js.

Status

Experimental. Please report issues here.

Goals and features

Nbb's main goal is to make it easy to get started with ad hoc CLJS scripting on Node.js.

Additional goals and features are:

  • Fast startup without relying on a custom version of Node.js.
  • Small artifact (current size is around 1.2MB).
  • First class macros.
  • Support building small TUI apps using Reagent.
  • Complement babashka with libraries from the Node.js ecosystem.

Requirements

Nbb requires Node.js v12 or newer.

How does this tool work?

CLJS code is evaluated through SCI, the same interpreter that powers babashka. Because SCI works with advanced compilation, the bundle size, especially when combined with other dependencies, is smaller than what you get with self-hosted CLJS. That makes startup faster. The trade-off is that execution is less performant and that only a subset of CLJS is available (e.g. no deftype, yet).

Usage

Install nbb from NPM:

$ npm install nbb -g

Omit -g for a local install.

Try out an expression:

$ nbb -e '(+ 1 2 3)'
6

And then install some other NPM libraries to use in the script. E.g.:

$ npm install csv-parse shelljs zx

Create a script which uses the NPM libraries:

(ns script
  (:require ["csv-parse/lib/sync$default" :as csv-parse]
            ["fs" :as fs]
            ["path" :as path]
            ["shelljs$default" :as sh]
            ["term-size$default" :as term-size]
            ["zx$default" :as zx]
            ["zx$fs" :as zxfs]
            [nbb.core :refer [*file*]]))

(prn (path/resolve "."))

(prn (term-size))

(println (count (str (fs/readFileSync *file*))))

(prn (sh/ls "."))

(prn (csv-parse "foo,bar"))

(prn (zxfs/existsSync *file*))

(zx/$ #js ["ls"])

Call the script:

$ nbb script.cljs
"/private/tmp/test-script"
#js {:columns 216, :rows 47}
510
#js ["node_modules" "package-lock.json" "package.json" "script.cljs"]
#js [#js ["foo" "bar"]]
true
$ ls
node_modules
package-lock.json
package.json
script.cljs

Macros

Nbb has first class support for macros: you can define them right inside your .cljs file, like you are used to from JVM Clojure. Consider the plet macro to make working with promises more palatable:

(defmacro plet
  [bindings & body]
  (let [binding-pairs (reverse (partition 2 bindings))
        body (cons 'do body)]
    (reduce (fn [body [sym expr]]
              (let [expr (list '.resolve 'js/Promise expr)]
                (list '.then expr (list 'clojure.core/fn (vector sym)
                                        body))))
            body
            binding-pairs)))

Using this macro we can look async code more like sync code. Consider this puppeteer example:

(-> (.launch puppeteer)
      (.then (fn [browser]
               (-> (.newPage browser)
                   (.then (fn [page]
                            (-> (.goto page "https://clojure.org")
                                (.then #(.screenshot page #js{:path "screenshot.png"}))
                                (.catch #(js/console.log %))
                                (.then #(.close browser)))))))))

Using plet this becomes:

(plet [browser (.launch puppeteer)
       page (.newPage browser)
       _ (.goto page "https://clojure.org")
       _ (-> (.screenshot page #js{:path "screenshot.png"})
             (.catch #(js/console.log %)))]
      (.close browser))

See the puppeteer example for the full code.

Since v0.0.36, nbb includes promesa which is a library to deal with promises. The above plet macro is similar to promesa.core/let.

Startup time

$ time nbb -e '(+ 1 2 3)'
6
nbb -e '(+ 1 2 3)'   0.17s  user 0.02s system 109% cpu 0.168 total

The baseline startup time for a script is about 170ms seconds on my laptop. When invoked via npx this adds another 300ms or so, so for faster startup, either use a globally installed nbb or use $(npm bin)/nbb script.cljs to bypass npx.

Dependencies

NPM dependencies

Nbb does not depend on any NPM dependencies. All NPM libraries loaded by a script are resolved relative to that script. When using the Reagent module, React is resolved in the same way as any other NPM library.

Classpath

To load .cljs files from local paths or dependencies, you can use the --classpath argument. The current dir is added to the classpath automatically. So if there is a file foo/bar.cljs relative to your current dir, then you can load it via (:require [foo.bar :as fb]). Note that nbb uses the same naming conventions for namespaces and directories as other Clojure tools: foo-bar in the namespace name becomes foo_bar in the directory name.

To load dependencies from the Clojure ecosystem, you can use the Clojure CLI or babashka to download them and produce a classpath:

$ classpath="$(clojure -A:nbb -Spath -Sdeps '{:aliases {:nbb {:replace-deps {com.github.seancorfield/honeysql {:git/tag "v2.0.0-rc5" :git/sha "01c3a55"}}}}}')"

and then feed it to the --classpath argument:

$ nbb --classpath "$classpath" -e "(require '[honey.sql :as sql]) (sql/format {:select :foo :from :bar :where [:= :baz 2]})"
["SELECT foo FROM bar WHERE baz = ?" 2]

Currently nbb only reads from directories, not jar files, so you are encouraged to use git libs. Support for .jar files will be added later.

Current file

The name of the file that is currently being executed is available via nbb.core/*file* or on the metadata of vars:

(ns foo
  (:require [nbb.core :refer [*file*]]))

(prn *file*) ;; "/private/tmp/foo.cljs"

(defn f [])
(prn (:file (meta #'f))) ;; "/private/tmp/foo.cljs"

Reagent

Nbb includes reagent.core which will be lazily loaded when required. You can use this together with ink to create a TUI application:

$ npm install ink

ink-demo.cljs:

(ns ink-demo
  (:require ["ink" :refer [render Text]]
            [reagent.core :as r]))

(defonce state (r/atom 0))

(doseq [n (range 1 11)]
  (js/setTimeout #(swap! state inc) (* n 500)))

(defn hello []
  [:> Text {:color "green"} "Hello, world! " @state])

(render (r/as-element [hello]))

Promesa

Working with callbacks and promises can become tedious. Since nbb v0.0.36 the promesa.core namespace is included with the let and do! macros. An example:

(ns prom
  (:require [promesa.core :as p]))

(defn sleep [ms]
  (js/Promise.
   (fn [resolve _]
     (js/setTimeout resolve ms))))

(defn do-stuff
  []
  (p/do!
   (println "Doing stuff which takes a while")
   (sleep 1000)
   1))

(p/let [a (do-stuff)
        b (inc a)
        c (do-stuff)
        d (+ b c)]
  (prn d))
$ nbb prom.cljs
Doing stuff which takes a while
Doing stuff which takes a while
3

Also see API docs.

Js-interop

Since nbb v0.0.75 applied-science/js-interop is available:

(ns example
  (:require [applied-science.js-interop :as j]))

(def o (j/lit {:a 1 :b 2 :c {:d 1}}))

(prn (j/select-keys o [:a :b])) ;; #js {:a 1, :b 2}
(prn (j/get-in o [:c :d])) ;; 1

Most of this library is supported in nbb, except the following:

  • destructuring using :syms
  • property access using .-x notation. In nbb, you must use keywords.

See the example of what is currently supported.

Examples

See the examples directory for small examples.

Also check out these projects built with nbb:

API

See API documentation.

Migrating to shadow-cljs

See this gist on how to convert an nbb script or project to shadow-cljs.

Build

Prequisites:

  • babashka >= 0.4.0
  • Clojure CLI >= 1.10.3.933
  • Node.js 16.5.0 (lower version may work, but this is the one I used to build)

To build:

  • Clone and cd into this repo
  • bb release

Run bb tasks for more project-related tasks.

Download Details:
Author: borkdude
Download Link: Download The Source Code
Official Website: https://github.com/borkdude/nbb 
License: EPL-1.0

#node #javascript

Next.js - NavLink Component Example with Active CSS Class

This is a quick post to show how to create a custom NavLink component in Next.js that extends the built-in Link component to add the CSS className "active" when the href attribute matches the current URL. It’s based on the nav link component from a Next.js CRUD example I posted recently, for full details including a working demo see Next.js 10 - CRUD Example with React Hook Form.

Next.js Custom NavLink Component

This is the NavLink component, by default the "active" class is added when the href matches the start of the URL pathname, use the exact property to change it to an exact match with the whole URL pathname.

import { useRouter } from 'next/router';
import Link from 'next/link';
import PropTypes from 'prop-types';

export { NavLink };

NavLink.propTypes = {
    href: PropTypes.string.isRequired,
    exact: PropTypes.bool
};

NavLink.defaultProps = {
    exact: false
};

function NavLink({ href, exact, children, ...props }) {
    const { pathname } = useRouter();
    const isActive = exact ? pathname === href : pathname.startsWith(href);

    if (isActive) {
        props.className += ' active';
    }

    return (
        <Link href={href}>
            <a {...props}>
                {children}
            </a>
        </Link>
    );
}

#next.js #css #navlink

Lawrence  Lesch

Lawrence Lesch

1662107520

Superdom: Better and Simpler ES6 DOM Manipulation

Superdom

You have dom. It has all the DOM virtually within it. Use that power:

// Fetch all the page links
let links = dom.a.href;

// Links open in a new tab
dom.a.target = '_blank';

Only for modern browsers

Getting started

Simply use the CDN via unpkg.com:

<script src="https://unpkg.com/superdom@1"></script>

Or use npm or bower:

npm|bower install superdom --save

Select

It always returns an array with the matched elements. Get all the elements that match the selector:

// Simple element selector into an array
let allLinks = dom.a;

// Loop straight on the selection
dom.a.forEach(link => { ... });

// Combined selector
let importantLinks = dom['a.important'];

There are also some predetermined elements, such as id, class and attr:

// Select HTML Elements by id:
let main = dom.id.main;

// by class:
let buttons = dom.class.button;

// or by attribute:
let targeted = dom.attr.target;
let targeted = dom.attr['target="_blank"'];

Generate

Use it as a function or a tagged template literal to generate DOM fragments:

// Not a typo; tagged template literals
let link = dom`<a href="https://google.com/">Google</a>`;

// It is the same as
let link = dom('<a href="https://google.com/">Google</a>');

Delete elements

Delete a piece of the DOM

// Delete all of the elements with the class .google
delete dom.class.google;   // Is this an ad-block rule?

Attributes

You can easily manipulate attributes right from the dom node. There are some aliases that share the syntax of the attributes such as html and text (aliases for innerHTML and textContent). There are others that travel through the dom such as parent (alias for parentNode) and children. Finally, class behaves differently as explained below.

Get attributes

The fetching will always return an array with the element for each of the matched nodes (or undefined if not there):

// Retrieve all the urls from the page
let urls = dom.a.href;     // #attr-list
  // ['https://google.com', 'https://facebook.com/', ...]

// Get an array of the h2 contents (alias of innerHTML)
let h2s = dom.h2.html;     // #attr-alias
  // ['Level 2 header', 'Another level 2 header', ...]

// Get whether any of the attributes has the value "_blank"
let hasBlank = dom.class.cta.target._blank;    // #attr-value
  // true/false

You also use these:

  • html (alias of innerHTML): retrieve a list of the htmls
  • text (alias of textContent): retrieve a list of the htmls
  • parent (alias of parentNode): travel up one level
  • children: travel down one level

Set attributes

// Set target="_blank" to all links
dom.a.target = '_blank';     // #attr-set
dom.class.tableofcontents.html = `
  <ul class="tableofcontents">
    ${dom.h2.map(h2 => `
      <li>
        <a href="#${h2.id}">
          ${h2.innerHTML}
        </a>
      </li>
    `).join('')}
  </ul>
`;

Remove an attribute

To delete an attribute use the delete keyword:

// Remove all urls from the page
delete dom.a.href;

// Remove all ids
delete dom.a.id;

Classes

It provides an easy way to manipulate the classes.

Get classes

To retrieve whether a particular class is present or not:

// Get an array with true/false for a single class
let isTest = dom.a.class.test;     // #class-one

For a general method to retrieve all classes you can do:

// Get a list of the classes of each matched element
let arrays = dom.a.class;     // #class-arrays
  // [['important'], ['button', 'cta'], ...]

// If you want a plain list with all of the classes:
let flatten = dom.a.class._flat;     // #class-flat
  // ['important', 'button', 'cta', ...]

// And if you just want an string with space-separated classes:
let text = dom.a.class._text;     // #class-text
  // 'important button cta ...'

Add a class

// Add the class 'test' (different ways)
dom.a.class.test = true;    // #class-make-true
dom.a.class = 'test';       // #class-push

Remove a class

// Remove the class 'test'
dom.a.class.test = false;    // #class-make-false

Manipulate

Did we say it returns a simple array?

dom.a.forEach(link => link.innerHTML = 'I am a link');

But what an interesting array it is; indeed we are also proxy'ing it so you can manipulate its sub-elements straight from the selector:

// Replace all of the link's html with 'I am a link'
dom.a.html = 'I am a link';

Of course we might want to manipulate them dynamically depending on the current value. Just pass it a function:

// Append ' ^_^' to all of the links in the page
dom.a.html = html => html + ' ^_^';

// Same as this:
dom.a.forEach(link => link.innerHTML = link.innerHTML + ' ^_^');

Note: this won't work dom.a.html += ' ^_^'; for more than 1 match (for reasons)

Or get into genetics to manipulate the attributes:

dom.a.attr.target = '_blank';

// Only to external sites:
let isOwnPage = el => /^https?\:\/\/mypage\.com/.test(el.getAttribute('href'));
dom.a.attr.target = (prev, i, element) => isOwnPage(element) ? '' : '_blank';

Events

You can also handle and trigger events:

// Handle click events for all <a>
dom.a.on.click = e => ...;

// Trigger click event for all <a>
dom.a.trigger.click;

Testing

We are using Jest as a Grunt task for testing. Install Jest and run in the terminal:

grunt watch

Download Details:

Author: franciscop
Source Code: https://github.com/franciscop/superdom 
License: MIT license

#javascript #es6 #dom 

Elvis Miranda

Elvis Miranda

1578029098

7 Best Vue CSS Component for Your App

Vue CSS frameworks are great for many reasons; code is more universally understood, web applications are easier to maintain, and prototyping becomes less of an extra step and more part of the development process.

1. Tailwindcss-Vue

Tailwindcss-Vue is a library of UI components for Vue.js built using the Tailwind CSS utility-first CSS framework.

Tailwindcss-Vue

Download: https://github.com/advanced-data-machines/tailwindcss-vue/archive/master.zip

2. @zeit-ui/vue

Vue implementation for Zeit Style, originating from Zeit Design.

@zeit-ui/vue is a Vue implementation for zeit style, originating from Zeit Design. Lean more at GITHUB.

The design of the Zeit is concise and aesthetic feeling, this is an important reason for popular of Zeit. Now you can use them through the @zeit-ui/vue.

zeit-ui/vue

Download: https://github.com/zeit-ui/vue/archive/master.zip

3. CSSeffectsSnippets

Click on the animation to copy it to your clipboard

CSSeffectsSnippets

Demo: https://emilkowalski.github.io/css-effects-snippets/

Download: https://github.com/emilkowalski/css-effects-snippets/archive/master.zip

4. Vue Cirrus

A fully responsive and comprehensive CSS framework with beautiful controls and simplistic structure. Cirrus is designed to be adaptable to existing themes or when starting fresh. These are the Vue Components for this CSS framework.

Vue Cirrus

Demo: https://florianwoelki.github.io/vue-cirrus/#/

Download: https://github.com/FlorianWoelki/vue-cirrus/archive/master.zip

5. Vue CSS Modules

Seamless mapping of class names to CSS modules inside of Vue components.

Vue CSS Modules

Download: https://github.com/fjc0k/vue-css-modules/archive/master.zip

6. BG MixMaster 90 — CSS Background Grid /Pattern Generator

make a background grid (like graph paper) using only one background gradient property and ended up with this killer mix tape for making all kinds of background grids and patterns.

BG MixMaster 90

Download: https://codepen.io/jasesmith/pen/YZEYRL

7. CSSOBJ

CSS Rules from JS, change rules dynamically, CSSOM, css modules, auto vendor prefixer, media query for old browsers.

CSS in JS solution, create CSSOM and CSS rules from js, features:

  • CSS Rules create and diff
  • CSS modules with local class
  • Auto vendor prefixer
  • Media query for old browsers
  • Dynamically change CSS

CSSOBJ

Demo: https://cssobj.github.io/cssobj-demo/

Download: https://github.com/cssobj/cssobj/archive/master.zip

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