What is this Javascript “require”?

I'm trying to get Javascript to read/write to a PostgreSQL database. I found this&nbsp;<a href="https://github.com/brianc/node-postgres" target="_blank">project</a>&nbsp;on github. I was able to get the following sample code to run in node.

I'm trying to get Javascript to read/write to a PostgreSQL database. I found this project on github. I was able to get the following sample code to run in node.

var pg = require('pg'); //native libpq bindings = `var pg = require('pg').native`
var conString = "tcp://postgres:[email protected]/postgres";

var client = new pg.Client(conString);
client.connect();

//queries are queued and executed one after another once the connection becomes available
client.query("CREATE TEMP TABLE beatles(name varchar(10), height integer, birthday timestamptz)");
client.query("INSERT INTO beatles(name, height, birthday) values($1, $2, $3)", ['Ringo', 67, new Date(1945, 11, 2)]);
client.query("INSERT INTO beatles(name, height, birthday) values($1, $2, $3)", ['John', 68, new Date(1944, 10, 13)]);

//queries can be executed either via text/parameter values passed as individual arguments
//or by passing an options object containing text, (optional) parameter values, and (optional) query name
client.query({
name: 'insert beatle',
text: "INSERT INTO beatles(name, height, birthday) values($1, $2, $3)",
values: ['George', 70, new Date(1946, 02, 14)]
});

//subsequent queries with the same name will be executed without re-parsing the query plan by postgres
client.query({
name: 'insert beatle',
values: ['Paul', 63, new Date(1945, 04, 03)]
});
var query = client.query("SELECT * FROM beatles WHERE name = $1", ['John']);

//can stream row results back 1 at a time
query.on('row', function(row) {
console.log(row);
console.log("Beatle name: %s", row.name); //Beatle name: John
console.log("Beatle birth year: %d", row.birthday.getYear()); //dates are returned as javascript dates
console.log("Beatle height: %d' %d"", Math.floor(row.height/12), row.height%12); //integers are returned as javascript ints
});

//fired after last row is emitted
query.on('end', function() {
client.end();
});

Next I tried to make it run on a webpage, but nothing seemed to happen. I checked on the Javascript console and it just says "require not defined."

So what is this "require?" Why does it work in node but not in a webpage?

Also, before I got it to work in node, I had to do npm install pg. What's that about? I looked in the directory and didn't find a file pg. Where did it put it, and how does Javascript find it?

Secure Node.js, Express.js and PostgreSQL API using Passport.js

Secure Node.js, Express.js and PostgreSQL API using Passport.js

The comprehensive step by step tutorial on building secure Node.js, Express.js, Passport.js, and PostgreSQL Restful Web Service

The comprehensive step by step tutorial on building secure Node.js, Express.js, Passport.js, and PostgreSQL Restful Web Service. Previously, we have shown you a combination of Node.js, Express.js, and PostgreSQL tutorial. Now, we just add a security for that RESTful Web Service endpoints. Of course, we will start this tutorial from scratch or from zero application. We will use JWT for this Node.js, Express.js, Passport.js, and PostgreSQL tutorial.

Table of Contents:

The following tools, frameworks, and modules are required for this tutorial:

We assume that you have installed PostgreSQL server in your machine or can use your own remote server (we are using PostgreSQL 9.5.13). Also, you have installed Node.js in your machine and can run node, npm or yarn command in your terminal or command line. Next, check their version by type this commands in your terminal or command line.

node -v
v8.12.0
npm -v
6.4.1
yarn -v
1.10.1

That the versions that we are uses. Let’s continue with the main steps.

1. Create Express.js Project and Install Required Modules

Open your terminal or node command line the go to your projects folder. First, install express generator using this command.

sudo npm install express-generator -g

Next, create an Express.js app using this command.

express secure-node --view=ejs

This will create Express.js project with the EJS view instead of Jade view template because using ‘–view=ejs’ parameter. Next, go to the newly created project folder then install node modules.

cd secure-node && npm install

You should see the folder structure like this.

There’s no view yet using the latest Express generator. We don’t need it because we will create a RESTful API.

2. Add and Configure Sequelize.js Module and Dependencies

Before installing the modules for this project, first, install Sequelize-CLI by type this command.

sudo npm install -g sequelize-cli

To install Sequelize.js module, type this command.

npm install --save sequelize

Then install the module for PostgreSQL.

npm install --save pg pg-hstore

Next, create a new file at the root of the project folder.

touch .sequelizerc

Open and edit that file then add this lines of codes.

const path = require('path');

module.exports = {
&nbsp; "config": path.resolve('./config', 'config.json'),
&nbsp; "models-path": path.resolve('./models'),
&nbsp; "seeders-path": path.resolve('./seeders'),
&nbsp; "migrations-path": path.resolve('./migrations')
};

That files will tell Sequelize initialization to generate config, models, seeders and migrations files to specific directories. Next, type this command to initialize the Sequelize.

sequelize init

That command will create config/config.json, models/index.js, migrations and seeders directories and files. Next, open and edit config/config.json then make it like this.

{
&nbsp; "development": {
&nbsp; &nbsp; "username": "djamware",
&nbsp; &nbsp; "password": "[email&nbsp;protected]@r3",
&nbsp; &nbsp; "database": "secure_node",
&nbsp; &nbsp; "host": "127.0.0.1",
&nbsp; &nbsp; "dialect": "postgres"
&nbsp; },
&nbsp; "test": {
&nbsp; &nbsp; "username": "root",
&nbsp; &nbsp; "password": "[email&nbsp;protected]@r3",
&nbsp; &nbsp; "database": "secure_node",
&nbsp; &nbsp; "host": "127.0.0.1",
&nbsp; &nbsp; "dialect": "postgres"
&nbsp; },
&nbsp; "production": {
&nbsp; &nbsp; "username": "root",
&nbsp; &nbsp; "password": "[email&nbsp;protected]@r3",
&nbsp; &nbsp; "database": "secure_node",
&nbsp; &nbsp; "host": "127.0.0.1",
&nbsp; &nbsp; "dialect": "postgres"
&nbsp; }
}

We use the same configuration for all the environment because we are using the same machine, server, and database for this tutorial.

Before run and test connection, make sure you have created a database as described in the above configuration. You can use the psql command to create a user and database.

psql postgres --u postgres

Next, type this command for creating a new user with password then give access for creating the database.

postgres-# CREATE ROLE djamware WITH LOGIN PASSWORD '[email&nbsp;protected]@r3';
postgres-# ALTER ROLE djamware CREATEDB;

Quit psql then log in again using the new user that previously created.

postgres-# \q
psql postgres -U djamware

Enter the password, then you will enter this psql console.

psql (9.5.13)
Type "help" for help.

postgres=>

Type this command to creating a new database.

postgres=> CREATE DATABASE secure_node;

Then give that new user privileges to the new database then quit the psql.

postgres=> GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON DATABASE secure_node TO djamware;
postgres=> \q

3. Create or Generate Models and Migrations

We will use Sequelize-CLI to generating a new model. Type this command to create a model for Products and User model for authentication.

sequelize model:create --name Product --attributes prod_name:string,prod_desc:string,prod_price:float
sequelize model:create --name User --attributes username:string,password:string

That command creates a model file to the model’s folder and a migration file to folder migrations. Next, modify models/user.js and then import this module.

var bcrypt = require('bcrypt-nodejs');

Add the new methods to the User model, so the user.js class will be like this.

module.exports = (sequelize, DataTypes) => {
&nbsp; const User = sequelize.define('User', {
&nbsp; &nbsp; username: DataTypes.STRING,
&nbsp; &nbsp; password: DataTypes.STRING
&nbsp; }, {});
&nbsp; User.beforeSave((user, options) => {
&nbsp; &nbsp; if (user.changed('password')) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; user.password = bcrypt.hashSync(user.password, bcrypt.genSaltSync(10), null);
&nbsp; &nbsp; }
&nbsp; });
&nbsp; User.prototype.comparePassword = function (passw, cb) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; bcrypt.compare(passw, this.password, function (err, isMatch) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; if (err) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; return cb(err);
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; }
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; cb(null, isMatch);
&nbsp; &nbsp; });
&nbsp; };
&nbsp; User.associate = function(models) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; // associations can be defined here
&nbsp; };
&nbsp; return User;
};

For the models/product.js there’s no action needed, leave it as default generated the model class.

4. Create Routers for RESTful Web Service and Authentication

To authenticating users and secure the resources or endpoint create this file as a router.

touch routes/api.js

Open and edit routes/api.js then declares all require variables.

const express = require('express');
const jwt = require('jsonwebtoken');
const passport = require('passport');
const router = express.Router();
require('../config/passport')(passport);
const Product = require('../models').Product;
const User = require('../models').User;

Create a router for signup or register the new user.

router.post('/signup', function(req, res) {
&nbsp; console.log(req.body);
&nbsp; if (!req.body.username || !req.body.password) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; res.status(400).send({msg: 'Please pass username and password.'})
&nbsp; } else {
&nbsp; &nbsp; User
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; .create({
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; username: req.body.username,
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; password: req.body.password
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; })
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; .then((user) => res.status(201).send(user))
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; .catch((error) => {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; console.log(error);
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; res.status(400).send(error);
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; });
&nbsp; }
});

Create a router for sign in or login with username and password.

router.post('/signin', function(req, res) {
&nbsp; User
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; .find({
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; where: {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; username: req.body.username
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; }
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; })
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; .then((user) => {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; if (!user) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; return res.status(401).send({
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; message: 'Authentication failed. User not found.',
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; });
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; }
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; user.comparePassword(req.body.password, (err, isMatch) => {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; if(isMatch && !err) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; var token = jwt.sign(JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(user)), 'nodeauthsecret', {expiresIn: 86400 * 30});
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; jwt.verify(token, 'nodeauthsecret', function(err, data){
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; console.log(err, data);
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; })
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; res.json({success: true, token: 'JWT ' + token});
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; } else {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; res.status(401).send({success: false, msg: 'Authentication failed. Wrong password.'});
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; }
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; })
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; })
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; .catch((error) => res.status(400).send(error));
});

Create a secure router to get and post product data.

router.get('/product', passport.authenticate('jwt', { session: false}), function(req, res) {
&nbsp; var token = getToken(req.headers);
&nbsp; if (token) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; Product
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; .findAll()
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; .then((products) => res.status(200).send(products))
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; .catch((error) => { res.status(400).send(error); });
&nbsp; } else {
&nbsp; &nbsp; return res.status(403).send({success: false, msg: 'Unauthorized.'});
&nbsp; }
});

router.post('/product', passport.authenticate('jwt', { session: false}), function(req, res) {
&nbsp; var token = getToken(req.headers);
&nbsp; if (token) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; Product
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; .create({
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; prod_name: req.body.prod_name,
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; prod_desc: req.body.prod_desc,
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; prod_price: req.body.prod_price
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; })
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; .then((product) => res.status(201).send(product))
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; .catch((error) => res.status(400).send(error));
&nbsp; } else {
&nbsp; &nbsp; return res.status(403).send({success: false, msg: 'Unauthorized.'});
&nbsp; }
});

Create a function for extract the token.

getToken = function (headers) {
&nbsp; if (headers && headers.authorization) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; var parted = headers.authorization.split(' ');
&nbsp; &nbsp; if (parted.length === 2) {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; return parted[1];
&nbsp; &nbsp; } else {
&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; return null;
&nbsp; &nbsp; }
&nbsp; } else {
&nbsp; &nbsp; return null;
&nbsp; }
};

Finally, export the router as a module.

module.exports = router;

5. Run and Test Secure Node.js, Express.js, Passport.js, and PostgreSQL Web Service

To run and test this secure Node.js, Express.js, Passport.js, and PostgreSQL Web Service, run the PostgreSQL instance first then run this command from the Terminal.

nodemon

or

npm start

To test the secure Product endpoint, open the Postman then type fill all required fields like this image.

You should get the response message Unauthorized and status code 401. Next, test signup using the Postman by changing the method to POST, add the address localhost:3000/api/signup, add the header Content-type with value application/json and the body of request raw text like this.

{ "username":"[email&nbsp;protected]", "password":"qqqq1111" }

You should get this response when executing successfully.

Next, test to log in with the above signed/registered username and password by changing the URL to localhost:3000/api/signin. You should get this response when executes successfully.

Now, you can back using the previous GET method with additional header using the token get from the sign in/log in response. You should see the Product data like below.

That it’s, the secure Node.js, Express.js, Passport.js, and PostgreSQL Web Service. You can get the working source code from our GitHub.

Learn More

The Complete Node.js Developer Course (2nd Edition)

Learn and Understand NodeJS

Node JS: Advanced Concepts

GraphQL: Learning GraphQL with Node.Js

Angular (Angular 2+) & NodeJS - The MEAN Stack Guide

The Complete Python & PostgreSQL Developer Course

SQL & Database Design A-Z™: Learn MS SQL Server + PostgreSQL

The Complete SQL Bootcamp

The Complete Oracle SQL Certification Course

Top 7 Most Popular Node.js Frameworks You Should Know

Top 7 Most Popular Node.js Frameworks You Should Know

Node.js is an open-source, cross-platform, runtime environment that allows developers to run JavaScript outside of a browser. In this post, you'll see top 7 of the most popular Node frameworks at this point in time (ranked from high to low by GitHub stars).

Node.js is an open-source, cross-platform, runtime environment that allows developers to run JavaScript outside of a browser.

One of the main advantages of Node is that it enables developers to use JavaScript on both the front-end and the back-end of an application. This not only makes the source code of any app cleaner and more consistent, but it significantly speeds up app development too, as developers only need to use one language.

Node is fast, scalable, and easy to get started with. Its default package manager is npm, which means it also sports the largest ecosystem of open-source libraries. Node is used by companies such as NASA, Uber, Netflix, and Walmart.

But Node doesn't come alone. It comes with a plethora of frameworks. A Node framework can be pictured as the external scaffolding that you can build your app in. These frameworks are built on top of Node and extend the technology's functionality, mostly by making apps easier to prototype and develop, while also making them faster and more scalable.

Below are 7of the most popular Node frameworks at this point in time (ranked from high to low by GitHub stars).

Express

With over 43,000 GitHub stars, Express is the most popular Node framework. It brands itself as a fast, unopinionated, and minimalist framework. Express acts as middleware: it helps set up and configure routes to send and receive requests between the front-end and the database of an app.

Express provides lightweight, powerful tools for HTTP servers. It's a great framework for single-page apps, websites, hybrids, or public HTTP APIs. It supports over fourteen different template engines, so developers aren't forced into any specific ORM.

Meteor

Meteor is a full-stack JavaScript platform. It allows developers to build real-time web apps, i.e. apps where code changes are pushed to all browsers and devices in real-time. Additionally, servers send data over the wire, instead of HTML. The client renders the data.

The project has over 41,000 GitHub stars and is built to power large projects. Meteor is used by companies such as Mazda, Honeywell, Qualcomm, and IKEA. It has excellent documentation and a strong community behind it.

Koa

Koa is built by the same team that built Express. It uses ES6 methods that allow developers to work without callbacks. Developers also have more control over error-handling. Koa has no middleware within its core, which means that developers have more control over configuration, but which means that traditional Node middleware (e.g. req, res, next) won't work with Koa.

Koa already has over 26,000 GitHub stars. The Express developers built Koa because they wanted a lighter framework that was more expressive and more robust than Express. You can find out more about the differences between Koa and Express here.

Sails

Sails is a real-time, MVC framework for Node that's built on Express. It supports auto-generated REST APIs and comes with an easy WebSocket integration.

The project has over 20,000 stars on GitHub and is compatible with almost all databases (MySQL, MongoDB, PostgreSQL, Redis). It's also compatible with most front-end technologies (Angular, iOS, Android, React, and even Windows Phone).

Nest

Nest has over 15,000 GitHub stars. It uses progressive JavaScript and is built with TypeScript, which means it comes with strong typing. It combines elements of object-oriented programming, functional programming, and functional reactive programming.

Nest is packaged in such a way it serves as a complete development kit for writing enterprise-level apps. The framework uses Express, but is compatible with a wide range of other libraries.

LoopBack

LoopBack is a framework that allows developers to quickly create REST APIs. It has an easy-to-use CLI wizard and allows developers to create models either on their schema or dynamically. It also has a built-in API explorer.

LoopBack has over 12,000 GitHub stars and is used by companies such as GoDaddy, Symantec, and the Bank of America. It's compatible with many REST services and a wide variety of databases (MongoDB, Oracle, MySQL, PostgreSQL).

Hapi

Similar to Express, hapi serves data by intermediating between server-side and client-side. As such, it's can serve as a substitute for Express. Hapi allows developers to focus on writing reusable app logic in a modular and prescriptive fashion.

The project has over 11,000 GitHub stars. It has built-in support for input validation, caching, authentication, and more. Hapi was originally developed to handle all of Walmart's mobile traffic during Black Friday.

Json Javascript database for Node.js, Electron and Browser

Json Javascript database for Node.js, Electron and Browser

JSON Javascript database for Node.js, Electron and the browser. Powered by Lodash. ⚡️

lowdb is a small local JSON database powered by Lodash (supports Node, Electron and the Browser)

Install

npm install lowdb

Alternatively, if you're using yarn

yarn add lowdb

A UMD build is also available on unpkg for testing and quick prototyping:

<script src="https://unpkg.com/[email protected]/lodash.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://unpkg.com/[email protected]/dist/low.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://unpkg.com/[email protected]/dist/LocalStorage.min.js"></script>
<script>
  var adapter = new LocalStorage('db')
  var db = low(adapter)
</script>

How to use LowDB

db.get('posts')
  .push({ id: 1, title: 'lowdb is awesome'})
  .write()
const low = require('lowdb')
const FileSync = require('lowdb/adapters/FileSync')

const adapter = new FileSync('db.json')
const db = low(adapter)

// Set some defaults (required if your JSON file is empty)
db.defaults({ posts: [], user: {}, count: 0 })
  .write()

// Add a post
db.get('posts')
  .push({ id: 1, title: 'lowdb is awesome'})
  .write()

// Set a user using Lodash shorthand syntax
db.set('user.name', 'typicode')
  .write()
  
// Increment count
db.update('count', n => n + 1)
  .write()

Data is saved to db.json

{
  "posts": [
    { "id": 1, "title": "lowdb is awesome"}
  ],
  "user": {
    "name": "typicode"
  },
  "count": 1
}

You can use any of the powerful lodash functions, like _.get and _.find with shorthand syntax.

// For performance, use .value() instead of .write() if you're only reading from db
db.get('posts')
  .find({ id: 1 })
  .value()

Lowdb is perfect for CLIs, small servers, Electron apps and npm packages in general.

It supports Node, the browser and uses lodash API, so it's very simple to learn. Actually, if you know Lodash, you already know how to use lowdb

Important lowdb doesn't support Cluster and may have issues with very large JSON files (~200MB).

API

low(adapter)

Returns a lodash chain with additional properties and functions described below.

db.[...].write() and db.[...].value()

write() writes database to state.

On the other hand, value() is just _.prototype.value() and should be used to execute a chain that doesn't change database state.

db.set('user.name', 'typicode')
  .write()

Please note that db.[...].write() is syntactic sugar and equivalent to

db.set('user.name', 'typicode')
  .value()

db.write()

db._

Database lodash instance. Use it to add your own utility functions or third-party mixins like underscore-contrib or lodash-id.

db._.mixin({
  second: function(array) {
    return array[1]
  }
})

db.get('posts')
  .second()
  .value()

db.getState()

Returns database state.

db.getState() // { posts: [ ... ] }

db.setState(newState)

Replaces database state.

const newState = {}
db.setState(newState)

db.write()

Persists database using adapter.write (depending on the adapter, may return a promise).

// With lowdb/adapters/FileSync
db.write()
console.log('State has been saved')

// With lowdb/adapters/FileAsync
db.write()
  .then(() => console.log('State has been saved'))

db.read()

Reads source using storage.read option (depending on the adapter, may return a promise).

// With lowdb/FileSync
db.read()
console.log('State has been updated')

// With lowdb/FileAsync
db.read()
  .then(() => console.log('State has been updated'))

Adapters API

Please note this only applies to adapters bundled with Lowdb. Third-party adapters may have different options.

For convenience, FileSync, FileAsync and LocalBrowser accept the following options:

  • defaultValue if file doesn't exist, this value will be used to set the initial state (default: {})
  • serialize/deserialize functions used before writing and after reading (default: JSON.stringify and JSON.parse)
const adapter = new FileSync('array.yaml', {
  defaultValue: [],
  serialize: (array) => toYamlString(array),
  deserialize: (string) => fromYamlString(string)
})

Guide

How to query

With lowdb, you get access to the entire lodash API, so there are many ways to query and manipulate data. Here are a few examples to get you started.

Please note that data is returned by reference, this means that modifications to returned objects may change the database. To avoid such behaviour, you need to use .cloneDeep().

Also, the execution of methods is lazy, that is, execution is deferred until .value() or .write() is called.

Reading from existing JSON file

If you are reading from a file adapter, the path is relative to execution path (CWD) and not to your code.

my_project/
  src/
    my_example.js
  db.json 

So then you read it like this:

// file src/my_example.js
const adapter = new FileSync('db.json')

// With lowdb/FileAsync
db.read()
  .then(() => console.log('Content of my_project/db.json is loaded'))

Examples

Check if posts exists.

db.has('posts')
  .value()

Set posts.

db.set('posts', [])
  .write()

Sort the top five posts.

db.get('posts')
  .filter({published: true})
  .sortBy('views')
  .take(5)
  .value()

Get post titles.

db.get('posts')
  .map('title')
  .value()

Get the number of posts.

db.get('posts')
  .size()
  .value()

Get the title of first post using a path.

db.get('posts[0].title')
  .value()

Update a post.

db.get('posts')
  .find({ title: 'low!' })
  .assign({ title: 'hi!'})
  .write()

Remove posts.

db.get('posts')
  .remove({ title: 'low!' })
  .write()

Remove a property.

db.unset('user.name')
  .write()

Make a deep clone of posts.

db.get('posts')
  .cloneDeep()
  .value()

How to use id based resources

Being able to get data using an id can be quite useful, particularly in servers. To add id-based resources support to lowdb, you have 2 options.

shortid is more minimalist and returns a unique id that you can use when creating resources.

const shortid = require('shortid')

const postId = db
  .get('posts')
  .push({ id: shortid.generate(), title: 'low!' })
  .write()
  .id

const post = db
  .get('posts')
  .find({ id: postId })
  .value()

lodash-id provides a set of helpers for creating and manipulating id-based resources.

const lodashId = require('lodash-id')
const FileSync = require('lowdb/adapters/FileSync')

const adapter = new FileSync('db.json')
const db = low(adapter)

db._.mixin(lodashId)

// We need to set some default values, if the collection does not exist yet
// We also can store our collection
const collection = db
  .defaults({ posts: [] })
  .get('posts')

// Insert a new post...
const newPost = collection
  .insert({ title: 'low!' })
  .write()

// ...and retrieve it using its id
const post = collection
  .getById(newPost.id)
  .value()

How to create custom adapters

low() accepts custom Adapter, so you can virtually save your data to any storage using any format.

class MyStorage {
  constructor() {
    // ...
  }

  read() {
    // Should return data (object or array) or a Promise
  }

  write(data) {
    // Should return nothing or a Promise
  }
}

const adapter = new MyStorage(args)
const db = low(adapter)

See src/adapters for examples.

How to encrypt data

FileSync, FileAsync and LocalStorage accept custom serialize and deserialize functions. You can use them to add encryption logic.

const adapter = new FileSync('db.json', {
  serialize: (data) => encrypt(JSON.stringify(data)),
  deserialize: (data) => JSON.parse(decrypt(data))
})

Changelog

See changes for each version in the release notes.

Limits

Lowdb is a convenient method for storing data without setting up a database server. It is fast enough and safe to be used as an embedded database.

However, if you seek high performance and scalability more than simplicity, you should probably stick to traditional databases like MongoDB.

Source Code

https://github.com/typicode/lowdb