Vern  Greenholt

Vern Greenholt

1594427220

New Bill Targeting ‘Warrant-Proof’ Encryption Draws Ire

The Lawful Access to Encrypted Data Act is being decried as “an awful idea” by security experts.

Privacy advocates are decrying a new bill, which would force tech companies to unlock encrypted devices if ordered to do so by law enforcement with a court issued warrant.

The Lawful Access to Encrypted Data Act was introduced on Tuesday by Senate Judiciary Committee

Chairman Lindsey Graham (R-SC), Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR) and Sen. Marsha Blackburn (R-TN). The three argued that ending the use of “warrant-proof” encrypted technology would “bolster national security interests” and “better protect communities across the country.” Such encryption cloaks illicit behavior during criminal investigations into terrorists and other bad actors, they said.

Tech companies, security and privacy experts all staunchly disagree, arguing that the bill will instead open up a potential for abuse from law enforcement, and obstruct on the data privacy of consumers.

“Bluntly, this bill is an awful idea,” Allan Liska, solutions architect with Recorded Future, told Threatpost. “Any sort of backdoor or weakened encryption can be used by adversaries to gain access to unauthorized data, not to mention the potential for abuse by law enforcement, despite assurances to the contrary. Finally, if this bill were to pass, people who are conducting nefarious activity will just switch to tools that are built outside of the United States where there will be no backdoor access. So, the FBI will not only not be able to access the data, they won’t even be able to access unencrypted metadata that can prove very valuable in tracking down bad guys.”

Tech companies argue that the government should instead be focusing on external cybercriminal threats, rather than imposing on the privacy of data that’s protected by companies.

“At a time when cyberthreats from criminals, hackers, and nation states are on the rise, our nation’s leaders should not be calling on companies to weaken the encryption that allows us all to communicate privately and securely,” said Will Cathcart, head of WhatsApp, in a tweet.

A Facebook spokesperson added that “rolling back this vital protection will make us all less safe, not more.”

“End-to-end encryption is a necessity in modern life — it protects billions of messages sent every day on many apps and services, especially in times like these when we can’t be together,” said the spokesperson told Threatpost via email. “We are committed to continuing to work with law enforcement and fighting abuse while preserving the ability for all Americans to communicate privately and securely.”

The new bill also directs the Attorney General to create a “prize competition” that awards participants who create a “lawful access solution in an encrypted environment.” Finally, it also funds a grant program within the Justice Department’s National Domestic Communications Assistance Center (NDCAC) to increase digital evidence training for law enforcement and creates a call center for advice and assistance during investigations.

“Tech companies’ increasing reliance on encryption has turned their platforms into a new, lawless playground of criminal activity. Criminals from child predators to terrorists are taking full advantage. This bill will ensure law enforcement can access encrypted material with a warrant based on probable cause and help put an end to the Wild West of crime on the Internet,” said Cotton in a statement.

Tech companies and the government have long butted heads over the issue of data privacy in the context of criminal investigations, with Federal Bureau of Investigation Director Christopher Wray previously calling unbreakable encryption an “urgent public safety issue.”

#government #privacy #apple #data analysis

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Buddha Community

New Bill Targeting ‘Warrant-Proof’ Encryption Draws Ire
Dylan  Iqbal

Dylan Iqbal

1561523460

Matplotlib Cheat Sheet: Plotting in Python

This Matplotlib cheat sheet introduces you to the basics that you need to plot your data with Python and includes code samples.

Data visualization and storytelling with your data are essential skills that every data scientist needs to communicate insights gained from analyses effectively to any audience out there. 

For most beginners, the first package that they use to get in touch with data visualization and storytelling is, naturally, Matplotlib: it is a Python 2D plotting library that enables users to make publication-quality figures. But, what might be even more convincing is the fact that other packages, such as Pandas, intend to build more plotting integration with Matplotlib as time goes on.

However, what might slow down beginners is the fact that this package is pretty extensive. There is so much that you can do with it and it might be hard to still keep a structure when you're learning how to work with Matplotlib.   

DataCamp has created a Matplotlib cheat sheet for those who might already know how to use the package to their advantage to make beautiful plots in Python, but that still want to keep a one-page reference handy. Of course, for those who don't know how to work with Matplotlib, this might be the extra push be convinced and to finally get started with data visualization in Python. 

You'll see that this cheat sheet presents you with the six basic steps that you can go through to make beautiful plots. 

Check out the infographic by clicking on the button below:

Python Matplotlib cheat sheet

With this handy reference, you'll familiarize yourself in no time with the basics of Matplotlib: you'll learn how you can prepare your data, create a new plot, use some basic plotting routines to your advantage, add customizations to your plots, and save, show and close the plots that you make.

What might have looked difficult before will definitely be more clear once you start using this cheat sheet! Use it in combination with the Matplotlib Gallery, the documentation.

Matplotlib 

Matplotlib is a Python 2D plotting library which produces publication-quality figures in a variety of hardcopy formats and interactive environments across platforms.

Prepare the Data 

1D Data 

>>> import numpy as np
>>> x = np.linspace(0, 10, 100)
>>> y = np.cos(x)
>>> z = np.sin(x)

2D Data or Images 

>>> data = 2 * np.random.random((10, 10))
>>> data2 = 3 * np.random.random((10, 10))
>>> Y, X = np.mgrid[-3:3:100j, -3:3:100j]
>>> U = 1 X** 2 + Y
>>> V = 1 + X Y**2
>>> from matplotlib.cbook import get_sample_data
>>> img = np.load(get_sample_data('axes_grid/bivariate_normal.npy'))

Create Plot

>>> import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

Figure 

>>> fig = plt.figure()
>>> fig2 = plt.figure(figsize=plt.figaspect(2.0))

Axes 

>>> fig.add_axes()
>>> ax1 = fig.add_subplot(221) #row-col-num
>>> ax3 = fig.add_subplot(212)
>>> fig3, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2,ncols=2)
>>> fig4, axes2 = plt.subplots(ncols=3)

Save Plot 

>>> plt.savefig('foo.png') #Save figures
>>> plt.savefig('foo.png',  transparent=True) #Save transparent figures

Show Plot

>>> plt.show()

Plotting Routines 

1D Data 

>>> fig, ax = plt.subplots()
>>> lines = ax.plot(x,y) #Draw points with lines or markers connecting them
>>> ax.scatter(x,y) #Draw unconnected points, scaled or colored
>>> axes[0,0].bar([1,2,3],[3,4,5]) #Plot vertical rectangles (constant width)
>>> axes[1,0].barh([0.5,1,2.5],[0,1,2]) #Plot horiontal rectangles (constant height)
>>> axes[1,1].axhline(0.45) #Draw a horizontal line across axes
>>> axes[0,1].axvline(0.65) #Draw a vertical line across axes
>>> ax.fill(x,y,color='blue') #Draw filled polygons
>>> ax.fill_between(x,y,color='yellow') #Fill between y values and 0

2D Data 

>>> fig, ax = plt.subplots()
>>> im = ax.imshow(img, #Colormapped or RGB arrays
      cmap= 'gist_earth', 
      interpolation= 'nearest',
      vmin=-2,
      vmax=2)
>>> axes2[0].pcolor(data2) #Pseudocolor plot of 2D array
>>> axes2[0].pcolormesh(data) #Pseudocolor plot of 2D array
>>> CS = plt.contour(Y,X,U) #Plot contours
>>> axes2[2].contourf(data1) #Plot filled contours
>>> axes2[2]= ax.clabel(CS) #Label a contour plot

Vector Fields 

>>> axes[0,1].arrow(0,0,0.5,0.5) #Add an arrow to the axes
>>> axes[1,1].quiver(y,z) #Plot a 2D field of arrows
>>> axes[0,1].streamplot(X,Y,U,V) #Plot a 2D field of arrows

Data Distributions 

>>> ax1.hist(y) #Plot a histogram
>>> ax3.boxplot(y) #Make a box and whisker plot
>>> ax3.violinplot(z)  #Make a violin plot

Plot Anatomy & Workflow 

Plot Anatomy 

 y-axis      

                           x-axis 

Workflow 

The basic steps to creating plots with matplotlib are:

1 Prepare Data
2 Create Plot
3 Plot
4 Customized Plot
5 Save Plot
6 Show Plot

>>> import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
>>> x = [1,2,3,4]  #Step 1
>>> y = [10,20,25,30] 
>>> fig = plt.figure() #Step 2
>>> ax = fig.add_subplot(111) #Step 3
>>> ax.plot(x, y, color= 'lightblue', linewidth=3)  #Step 3, 4
>>> ax.scatter([2,4,6],
          [5,15,25],
          color= 'darkgreen',
          marker= '^' )
>>> ax.set_xlim(1, 6.5)
>>> plt.savefig('foo.png' ) #Step 5
>>> plt.show() #Step 6

Close and Clear 

>>> plt.cla()  #Clear an axis
>>> plt.clf(). #Clear the entire figure
>>> plt.close(). #Close a window

Plotting Customize Plot 

Colors, Color Bars & Color Maps 

>>> plt.plot(x, x, x, x**2, x, x** 3)
>>> ax.plot(x, y, alpha = 0.4)
>>> ax.plot(x, y, c= 'k')
>>> fig.colorbar(im, orientation= 'horizontal')
>>> im = ax.imshow(img,
            cmap= 'seismic' )

Markers 

>>> fig, ax = plt.subplots()
>>> ax.scatter(x,y,marker= ".")
>>> ax.plot(x,y,marker= "o")

Linestyles 

>>> plt.plot(x,y,linewidth=4.0)
>>> plt.plot(x,y,ls= 'solid') 
>>> plt.plot(x,y,ls= '--') 
>>> plt.plot(x,y,'--' ,x**2,y**2,'-.' ) 
>>> plt.setp(lines,color= 'r',linewidth=4.0)

Text & Annotations 

>>> ax.text(1,
           -2.1, 
           'Example Graph', 
            style= 'italic' )
>>> ax.annotate("Sine", 
xy=(8, 0),
xycoords= 'data', 
xytext=(10.5, 0),
textcoords= 'data', 
arrowprops=dict(arrowstyle= "->", 
connectionstyle="arc3"),)

Mathtext 

>>> plt.title(r '$sigma_i=15$', fontsize=20)

Limits, Legends and Layouts 

Limits & Autoscaling 

>>> ax.margins(x=0.0,y=0.1) #Add padding to a plot
>>> ax.axis('equal')  #Set the aspect ratio of the plot to 1
>>> ax.set(xlim=[0,10.5],ylim=[-1.5,1.5])  #Set limits for x-and y-axis
>>> ax.set_xlim(0,10.5) #Set limits for x-axis

Legends 

>>> ax.set(title= 'An Example Axes',  #Set a title and x-and y-axis labels
            ylabel= 'Y-Axis', 
            xlabel= 'X-Axis')
>>> ax.legend(loc= 'best')  #No overlapping plot elements

Ticks 

>>> ax.xaxis.set(ticks=range(1,5),  #Manually set x-ticks
             ticklabels=[3,100, 12,"foo" ])
>>> ax.tick_params(axis= 'y', #Make y-ticks longer and go in and out
             direction= 'inout', 
              length=10)

Subplot Spacing 

>>> fig3.subplots_adjust(wspace=0.5,   #Adjust the spacing between subplots
             hspace=0.3,
             left=0.125,
             right=0.9,
             top=0.9,
             bottom=0.1)
>>> fig.tight_layout() #Fit subplot(s) in to the figure area

Axis Spines 

>>> ax1.spines[ 'top'].set_visible(False) #Make the top axis line for a plot invisible
>>> ax1.spines['bottom' ].set_position(( 'outward',10))  #Move the bottom axis line outward

Have this Cheat Sheet at your fingertips

Original article source at https://www.datacamp.com

#matplotlib #cheatsheet #python

Vern  Greenholt

Vern Greenholt

1594427220

New Bill Targeting ‘Warrant-Proof’ Encryption Draws Ire

The Lawful Access to Encrypted Data Act is being decried as “an awful idea” by security experts.

Privacy advocates are decrying a new bill, which would force tech companies to unlock encrypted devices if ordered to do so by law enforcement with a court issued warrant.

The Lawful Access to Encrypted Data Act was introduced on Tuesday by Senate Judiciary Committee

Chairman Lindsey Graham (R-SC), Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR) and Sen. Marsha Blackburn (R-TN). The three argued that ending the use of “warrant-proof” encrypted technology would “bolster national security interests” and “better protect communities across the country.” Such encryption cloaks illicit behavior during criminal investigations into terrorists and other bad actors, they said.

Tech companies, security and privacy experts all staunchly disagree, arguing that the bill will instead open up a potential for abuse from law enforcement, and obstruct on the data privacy of consumers.

“Bluntly, this bill is an awful idea,” Allan Liska, solutions architect with Recorded Future, told Threatpost. “Any sort of backdoor or weakened encryption can be used by adversaries to gain access to unauthorized data, not to mention the potential for abuse by law enforcement, despite assurances to the contrary. Finally, if this bill were to pass, people who are conducting nefarious activity will just switch to tools that are built outside of the United States where there will be no backdoor access. So, the FBI will not only not be able to access the data, they won’t even be able to access unencrypted metadata that can prove very valuable in tracking down bad guys.”

Tech companies argue that the government should instead be focusing on external cybercriminal threats, rather than imposing on the privacy of data that’s protected by companies.

“At a time when cyberthreats from criminals, hackers, and nation states are on the rise, our nation’s leaders should not be calling on companies to weaken the encryption that allows us all to communicate privately and securely,” said Will Cathcart, head of WhatsApp, in a tweet.

A Facebook spokesperson added that “rolling back this vital protection will make us all less safe, not more.”

“End-to-end encryption is a necessity in modern life — it protects billions of messages sent every day on many apps and services, especially in times like these when we can’t be together,” said the spokesperson told Threatpost via email. “We are committed to continuing to work with law enforcement and fighting abuse while preserving the ability for all Americans to communicate privately and securely.”

The new bill also directs the Attorney General to create a “prize competition” that awards participants who create a “lawful access solution in an encrypted environment.” Finally, it also funds a grant program within the Justice Department’s National Domestic Communications Assistance Center (NDCAC) to increase digital evidence training for law enforcement and creates a call center for advice and assistance during investigations.

“Tech companies’ increasing reliance on encryption has turned their platforms into a new, lawless playground of criminal activity. Criminals from child predators to terrorists are taking full advantage. This bill will ensure law enforcement can access encrypted material with a warrant based on probable cause and help put an end to the Wild West of crime on the Internet,” said Cotton in a statement.

Tech companies and the government have long butted heads over the issue of data privacy in the context of criminal investigations, with Federal Bureau of Investigation Director Christopher Wray previously calling unbreakable encryption an “urgent public safety issue.”

#government #privacy #apple #data analysis

Justen  Hintz

Justen Hintz

1663559281

To-do List App with HTML, CSS and JavaScript

Learn how to create a to-do list app with local storage using HTML, CSS and JavaScript. Build a Todo list application with HTML, CSS and JavaScript. Learn the basics to JavaScript along with some more advanced features such as LocalStorage for saving data to the browser.

HTML:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
  <head>
    <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0" />
    <title>To Do List With Local Storage</title>
    <!-- Font Awesome Icons -->
    <link
      rel="stylesheet"
      href="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/font-awesome/6.2.0/css/all.min.css"
    />
    <!-- Google Fonts -->
    <link
      href="https://fonts.googleapis.com/css2?family=Poppins:wght@400;500&display=swap"
      rel="stylesheet"
    />
    <!-- Stylesheet -->
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="style.css" />
  </head>
  <body>
    <div class="container">
      <div id="new-task">
        <input type="text" placeholder="Enter The Task Here..." />
        <button id="push">Add</button>
      </div>
      <div id="tasks"></div>
    </div>
    <!-- Script -->
    <script src="script.js"></script>
  </body>
</html>

CSS:

* {
  padding: 0;
  margin: 0;
  box-sizing: border-box;
}
body {
  background-color: #0b87ff;
}
.container {
  width: 90%;
  max-width: 34em;
  position: absolute;
  transform: translate(-50%, -50%);
  top: 50%;
  left: 50%;
}
#new-task {
  position: relative;
  background-color: #ffffff;
  padding: 1.8em 1.25em;
  border-radius: 0.3em;
  box-shadow: 0 1.25em 1.8em rgba(1, 24, 48, 0.15);
  display: grid;
  grid-template-columns: 9fr 3fr;
  gap: 1em;
}
#new-task input {
  font-family: "Poppins", sans-serif;
  font-size: 1em;
  border: none;
  border-bottom: 2px solid #d1d3d4;
  padding: 0.8em 0.5em;
  color: #111111;
  font-weight: 500;
}
#new-task input:focus {
  outline: none;
  border-color: #0b87ff;
}
#new-task button {
  font-family: "Poppins", sans-serif;
  font-weight: 500;
  font-size: 1em;
  background-color: #0b87ff;
  color: #ffffff;
  outline: none;
  border: none;
  border-radius: 0.3em;
  cursor: pointer;
}
#tasks {
  background-color: #ffffff;
  position: relative;
  padding: 1.8em 1.25em;
  margin-top: 3.8em;
  width: 100%;
  box-shadow: 0 1.25em 1.8em rgba(1, 24, 48, 0.15);
  border-radius: 0.6em;
}
.task {
  background-color: #ffffff;
  padding: 0.3em 0.6em;
  margin-top: 0.6em;
  display: flex;
  align-items: center;
  border-bottom: 2px solid #d1d3d4;
  cursor: pointer;
}
.task span {
  font-family: "Poppins", sans-serif;
  font-size: 0.9em;
  font-weight: 400;
}
.task button {
  color: #ffffff;
  padding: 0.8em 0;
  width: 2.8em;
  border-radius: 0.3em;
  border: none;
  outline: none;
  cursor: pointer;
}
.delete {
  background-color: #fb3b3b;
}
.edit {
  background-color: #0b87ff;
  margin-left: auto;
  margin-right: 3em;
}
.completed {
  text-decoration: line-through;
}

Javascript:

//Initial References
const newTaskInput = document.querySelector("#new-task input");
const tasksDiv = document.querySelector("#tasks");
let deleteTasks, editTasks, tasks;
let updateNote = "";
let count;

//Function on window load
window.onload = () => {
  updateNote = "";
  count = Object.keys(localStorage).length;
  displayTasks();
};

//Function to Display The Tasks
const displayTasks = () => {
  if (Object.keys(localStorage).length > 0) {
    tasksDiv.style.display = "inline-block";
  } else {
    tasksDiv.style.display = "none";
  }

  //Clear the tasks
  tasksDiv.innerHTML = "";

  //Fetch All The Keys in local storage
  let tasks = Object.keys(localStorage);
  tasks = tasks.sort();

  for (let key of tasks) {
    let classValue = "";

    //Get all values
    let value = localStorage.getItem(key);
    let taskInnerDiv = document.createElement("div");
    taskInnerDiv.classList.add("task");
    taskInnerDiv.setAttribute("id", key);
    taskInnerDiv.innerHTML = `<span id="taskname">${key.split("_")[1]}</span>`;
    //localstorage would store boolean as string so we parse it to boolean back
    let editButton = document.createElement("button");
    editButton.classList.add("edit");
    editButton.innerHTML = `<i class="fa-solid fa-pen-to-square"></i>`;
    if (!JSON.parse(value)) {
      editButton.style.visibility = "visible";
    } else {
      editButton.style.visibility = "hidden";
      taskInnerDiv.classList.add("completed");
    }
    taskInnerDiv.appendChild(editButton);
    taskInnerDiv.innerHTML += `<button class="delete"><i class="fa-solid fa-trash"></i></button>`;
    tasksDiv.appendChild(taskInnerDiv);
  }

  //tasks completed
  tasks = document.querySelectorAll(".task");
  tasks.forEach((element, index) => {
    element.onclick = () => {
      //local storage update
      if (element.classList.contains("completed")) {
        updateStorage(element.id.split("_")[0], element.innerText, false);
      } else {
        updateStorage(element.id.split("_")[0], element.innerText, true);
      }
    };
  });

  //Edit Tasks
  editTasks = document.getElementsByClassName("edit");
  Array.from(editTasks).forEach((element, index) => {
    element.addEventListener("click", (e) => {
      //Stop propogation to outer elements (if removed when we click delete eventually rhw click will move to parent)
      e.stopPropagation();
      //disable other edit buttons when one task is being edited
      disableButtons(true);
      //update input value and remove div
      let parent = element.parentElement;
      newTaskInput.value = parent.querySelector("#taskname").innerText;
      //set updateNote to the task that is being edited
      updateNote = parent.id;
      //remove task
      parent.remove();
    });
  });

  //Delete Tasks
  deleteTasks = document.getElementsByClassName("delete");
  Array.from(deleteTasks).forEach((element, index) => {
    element.addEventListener("click", (e) => {
      e.stopPropagation();
      //Delete from local storage and remove div
      let parent = element.parentElement;
      removeTask(parent.id);
      parent.remove();
      count -= 1;
    });
  });
};

//Disable Edit Button
const disableButtons = (bool) => {
  let editButtons = document.getElementsByClassName("edit");
  Array.from(editButtons).forEach((element) => {
    element.disabled = bool;
  });
};

//Remove Task from local storage
const removeTask = (taskValue) => {
  localStorage.removeItem(taskValue);
  displayTasks();
};

//Add tasks to local storage
const updateStorage = (index, taskValue, completed) => {
  localStorage.setItem(`${index}_${taskValue}`, completed);
  displayTasks();
};

//Function To Add New Task
document.querySelector("#push").addEventListener("click", () => {
  //Enable the edit button
  disableButtons(false);
  if (newTaskInput.value.length == 0) {
    alert("Please Enter A Task");
  } else {
    //Store locally and display from local storage
    if (updateNote == "") {
      //new task
      updateStorage(count, newTaskInput.value, false);
    } else {
      //update task
      let existingCount = updateNote.split("_")[0];
      removeTask(updateNote);
      updateStorage(existingCount, newTaskInput.value, false);
      updateNote = "";
    }
    count += 1;
    newTaskInput.value = "";
  }
});

Related Videos

Build a Todo list app in HTML, CSS & JavaScript | JavaScript for Beginners tutorial

Build a Todo List App in HTML, CSS & JavaScript with LocalStorage | JavaScript for Beginners

To Do List using HTML CSS JavaScript | To Do List JavaScript

Create A Todo List App in HTML CSS & JavaScript | Todo App in JavaScript

#html #css #javascript

Stephie John

1606290330

What is ASO for Android & iOS Mobile App?

App Store Optimization is all about improving the visibility of a particular Android /iOS Mobile App on the App Store. Mobile App to optimize? Then go for Best SEO Company in New Zealand

How does ASO Really Work?
ASO is the process of improving the visibility of a mobile app in an app store. Just like search engine optimization (SEO) is for websites, App Store Optimization (ASO) is for mobile apps. Specifically, app store optimization includes the process of ranking highly in an app store’s search results and top charts rankings. Lia Infraservices the Top SEO Company in New Zealand and ASO marketers agrees that ranking higher in search results and top charts rankings will drive more downloads for an app.

ASO Focus on 2 Areas:
A. Search Optimization
B. Behavioral Approach

  1. Search Optimization:
    This part of App Store Optimization focuses on adjusting the name of the app and its keywords. When it comes to SEO services in New Zealand, each app is described by keywords, packed into a 100 character string. These keywords affect search rankings. The better the keywords, the higher the possibility for the app to appear in App Store search results.

/The more often the app appears in search results = the more installs /

Note: The app name is the strongest key phrase.

5 point method to Choose Keywords:
1.Create a list of general keywords based on the app description.
2.Find the Top 5 apps that target the already selected keywords.
3.Find keywords that work best for each of the 5 apps.
4.Now you should have created quite a large list of keywords. Get rid of those which don’t fit your app.
5.Create 100 characters, a comma separated string that contains the best keywords you chose.

  1. Behavioural Approach:
    App Store Optimization is not only about adjusting towards search algorithms, it’s also about human behavior. There are several areas on the Android/iOS Mobile App Store that trigger human decisions to make an install or to abandon it. These are the most important for us:

a.Application name
b.Rating
c.Screenshots / video preview
d.App description

Is your Mobile App Optimized?
When it comes to app downloads and revenue, approach the SEO Company in New Zealand, your app will do much better almost immediately after optimization. If you are interested in learning what the other factors that influence building an organic increase of app popularity are, you should get your mobile app developed by the expert SEO agency in New Zealand. Build your Android & iOS app at Lia Infraservices at cost and time effective.

#seo company in new zealand #seo services in new zealand #seo agency in new zealand #top seo company in new zealand #best seo company in new zealand #top digital marketing company in new zealand

Best App Development Companies in New York

Are you looking for a top mobile app development company in New York? Please find a list of the Best App Development Companies in New York that help to build high-quality, Robust, high-performance mobile app with advanced technology and features at an affordable price.

#best app development companies in new york #top app development companies in new york #custom app development companies in new york #leading app development companies in new york #app development companies in new york