Joel  Hawkins

Joel Hawkins

1609937880

How to Map the Spread of COVID-19 Globally in Minutes

A picture is worth a thousand words. Forgive the cliché here, but no time is this more important than when you’re trying to articulate data findings to a non-technical audience. Many people won’t want to see a page crammed with numbers. Neat data visuals could be the difference between getting your point across and losing your audience to boredom and blank stares.

In this post I’ll show you how to visualise the global spread of COVID-19 using Google BigQuerie’s GeoViz tool. Visualisations of this type can be done in a multitude of ways, I find GeoViz to be fast and intuitive.

By the end of this post, you’ll have built a map visualising new COVID-19 infections globally across the last 7 days.

#data-visualization #data-science #bigquery #covid19

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

How to Map the Spread of COVID-19 Globally in Minutes

Data Scientist Creates Python Script To Track Available Slots For Covid Vaccinations

Bhavesh Bhatt, Data Scientist from Fractal Analytics posted that he has created a Python script that checks the available slots for Covid-19 vaccination centres from CoWIN API in India. He has also shared the GitHub link to the script.

The YouTube content creator posted, “Tracking available slots for Covid-19 Vaccination Centers in India on the CoWIN website can be a bit strenuous.” “I have created a Python script which checks the available slots for Covid-19 vaccination centres from CoWIN API in India. I also plan to add features in this script of booking a slot using the API directly,” he added.

We asked Bhatt how did the idea come to fruition, he said, “Registration for Covid vaccines for those above 18 started on 28th of April. When I was going through the CoWIN website – https://www.cowin.gov.in/home, I found it hard to navigate and find empty slots across different pin codes near my residence. On the site itself, I discovered public APIs shared by the government [https://apisetu.gov.in/public/marketplace/api/cowin] so I decided to play around with it and that’s how I came up with the script.”

Talking about the Python script, Bhatt mentioned that he used just 2 simple python libraries to create the Python script, which is datetime and requests. The first part of the code helps the end-user to discover a unique district_id. “Once he has the district_id, he has to input the data range for which he wants to check availability which is where the 2nd part of the script comes in handy,” Bhatt added.

#news #covid centre #covid news #covid news india #covid python #covid tracing #covid tracker #covid vaccine #covid-19 news #data scientist #python #python script

Aketch  Rachel

Aketch Rachel

1618099140

How Is TCS Helping With COVID-19 Testing In India

COVID-19 cases have only been on the rise. With the non-availability of effective drugs and vaccines, one of the effective ways to control it is to detect it early in patients. However, the task is easier said than done. While a large number of test kits are being produced, they are not enough to conduct testing in large numbers.

Government-run body, C-CAMP or Centre for Cellular and Molecular Platform, has been a key enabler in driving COVID-19 testing as it has been aggressively building, managing and scaling the ecosystem of MSMEs to produce test kits indigenously. However, they might not be enough.

#opinions #c-camp #c-camp tcs #covid-19 #covid-19 testing #tcs #tcs covid-19

Abigail  Cassin

Abigail Cassin

1596574500

How The New AI Model For Rapid COVID-19 Screening Works?

With the current pandemic spreading like wildfire, the requirement for a faster diagnosis can not be more critical than now. As a matter of fact, the traditional real-time polymerase chain reaction testing (RT-PCR) using the nose and throat swab has not only been termed to have limited sensitivity but also time-consuming for operational reasons. Thus, to expedite the process of COVID-19 diagnosis, researchers from the University of Oxford developed two early-detection AI models leveraging the routine data collected from clinical reports.

In a recent paper, the Oxford researchers revealed the two AI models and highlighted its effectiveness in screening the virus in patients coming for checkups to the hospital — for an emergency checkup or for admitting in the hospital. To validate these real-time prediction models, researchers used primary clinical data, including lab tests of the patients, their vital signs and their blood reports.

Led by a team of doctors — including Dr Andrew Soltan, an NIHR Academic Clinical Fellow at the John Radcliffe Hospital, Professor David Clifton from Oxford’s Institute of Biomedical Engineering, and Professor David Eyre from the Oxford Big Data Institute — the research initiated with developing ML algorithms trained on COVID-19 data and pre-COVID-19 controls to identify the differences. The study has been aimed to determine the level of risk a patient can have to have COVID-19.

#opinions #covid screening #covid-19 news #covid-19 screening test #detecting covid

Grace  Lesch

Grace Lesch

1622533686

How to Track the Spread of a Global Pandemic Through a Graph Database

Evidences have shown the nCOV transmitted from person to person. I.e., if extracted the transmission in graph model, a person transmitted to one another through an edge (Demo 1). Consider that A infects B, then B infects C, then C to D… This makes the tree-like path (Demo 2). However, given cross-infection, repeated use of the public places and transportation, the spreading path of the virus becomes a network structure.

#coronavirus #covid-19 #database #global pandemic #spread

Python Global Variables – How to Define a Global Variable Example

In this article, you will learn the basics of global variables.

To begin with, you will learn how to declare variables in Python and what the term 'variable scope' actually means.

Then, you will learn the differences between local and global variables and understand how to define global variables and how to use the global keyword.

What Are Variables in Python and How Do You Create Them? An Introduction for Beginners

You can think of variables as storage containers.

They are storage containers for holding data, information, and values that you would like to save in the computer's memory. You can then reference or even manipulate them at some point throughout the life of the program.

A variable has a symbolic name, and you can think of that name as the label on the storage container that acts as its identifier.

The variable name will be a reference and pointer to the data stored inside it. So, there is no need to remember the details of your data and information – you only need to reference the variable name that holds that data and information.

When giving a variable a name, make sure that it is descriptive of the data it holds. Variable names need to be clear and easily understandable both for your future self and the other developers you may be working with.

Now, let's see how to actually create a variable in Python.

When declaring variables in Python, you don't need to specify their data type.

For example, in the C programming language, you have to mention explicitly the type of data the variable will hold.

So, if you wanted to store your age which is an integer, or int type, this is what you would have to do in C:

#include <stdio.h>
 
int main(void)
{
  int age = 28;
  // 'int' is the data type
  // 'age' is the name 
  // 'age' is capable of holding integer values
  // positive/negative whole numbers or 0
  // '=' is the assignment operator
  // '28' is the value
}

However, this is how you would write the above in Python:

age = 28

#'age' is the variable name, or identifier
# '=' is the assignment operator
#'28' is the value assigned to the variable, so '28' is the value of 'age'

The variable name is always on the left-hand side, and the value you want to assign goes on the right-hand side after the assignment operator.

Keep in mind that you can change the values of variables throughout the life of a program:

my_age = 28

print(f"My age in 2022 is {my_age}.")

my_age = 29

print(f"My age in 2023 will be {my_age}.")

#output

#My age in 2022 is 28.
#My age in 2023 will be 29.

You keep the same variable name, my_age, but only change the value from 28 to 29.

What Does Variable Scope in Python Mean?

Variable scope refers to the parts and boundaries of a Python program where a variable is available, accessible, and visible.

There are four types of scope for Python variables, which are also known as the LEGB rule:

  • Local,
  • Enclosing,
  • Global,
  • Built-in.

For the rest of this article, you will focus on learning about creating variables with global scope, and you will understand the difference between the local and global variable scopes.

How to Create Variables With Local Scope in Python

Variables defined inside a function's body have local scope, which means they are accessible only within that particular function. In other words, they are 'local' to that function.

You can only access a local variable by calling the function.

def learn_to_code():
    #create local variable
    coding_website = "freeCodeCamp"
    print(f"The best place to learn to code is with {coding_website}!")

#call function
learn_to_code()


#output

#The best place to learn to code is with freeCodeCamp!

Look at what happens when I try to access that variable with a local scope from outside the function's body:

def learn_to_code():
    #create local variable
    coding_website = "freeCodeCamp"
    print(f"The best place to learn to code is with {coding_website}!")

#try to print local variable 'coding_website' from outside the function
print(coding_website)

#output

#NameError: name 'coding_website' is not defined

It raises a NameError because it is not 'visible' in the rest of the program. It is only 'visible' within the function where it was defined.

How to Create Variables With Global Scope in Python

When you define a variable outside a function, like at the top of the file, it has a global scope and it is known as a global variable.

A global variable is accessed from anywhere in the program.

You can use it inside a function's body, as well as access it from outside a function:

#create a global variable
coding_website = "freeCodeCamp"

def learn_to_code():
    #access the variable 'coding_website' inside the function
    print(f"The best place to learn to code is with {coding_website}!")

#call the function
learn_to_code()

#access the variable 'coding_website' from outside the function
print(coding_website)

#output

#The best place to learn to code is with freeCodeCamp!
#freeCodeCamp

What happens when there is a global and local variable, and they both have the same name?

#global variable
city = "Athens"

def travel_plans():
    #local variable with the same name as the global variable
    city = "London"
    print(f"I want to visit {city} next year!")

#call function - this will output the value of local variable
travel_plans()

#reference global variable - this will output the value of global variable
print(f"I want to visit {city} next year!")

#output

#I want to visit London next year!
#I want to visit Athens next year!

In the example above, maybe you were not expecting that specific output.

Maybe you thought that the value of city would change when I assigned it a different value inside the function.

Maybe you expected that when I referenced the global variable with the line print(f" I want to visit {city} next year!"), the output would be #I want to visit London next year! instead of #I want to visit Athens next year!.

However, when the function was called, it printed the value of the local variable.

Then, when I referenced the global variable outside the function, the value assigned to the global variable was printed.

They didn't interfere with one another.

That said, using the same variable name for global and local variables is not considered a best practice. Make sure that your variables don't have the same name, as you may get some confusing results when you run your program.

How to Use the global Keyword in Python

What if you have a global variable but want to change its value inside a function?

Look at what happens when I try to do that:

#global variable
city = "Athens"

def travel_plans():
    #First, this is like when I tried to access the global variable defined outside the function. 
    # This works fine on its own, as you saw earlier on.
    print(f"I want to visit {city} next year!")

    #However, when I then try to re-assign a different value to the global variable 'city' from inside the function,
    #after trying to print it,
    #it will throw an error
    city = "London"
    print(f"I want to visit {city} next year!")

#call function
travel_plans()

#output

#UnboundLocalError: local variable 'city' referenced before assignment

By default Python thinks you want to use a local variable inside a function.

So, when I first try to print the value of the variable and then re-assign a value to the variable I am trying to access, Python gets confused.

The way to change the value of a global variable inside a function is by using the global keyword:

#global variable
city = "Athens"

#print value of global variable
print(f"I want to visit {city} next year!")

def travel_plans():
    global city
    #print initial value of global variable
    print(f"I want to visit {city} next year!")
    #assign a different value to global variable from within function
    city = "London"
    #print new value
    print(f"I want to visit {city} next year!")

#call function
travel_plans()

#print value of global variable
print(f"I want to visit {city} next year!")

Use the global keyword before referencing it in the function, as you will get the following error: SyntaxError: name 'city' is used prior to global declaration.

Earlier, you saw that you couldn't access variables created inside functions since they have local scope.

The global keyword changes the visibility of variables declared inside functions.

def learn_to_code():
   global coding_website
   coding_website = "freeCodeCamp"
   print(f"The best place to learn to code is with {coding_website}!")

#call function
learn_to_code()

#access variable from within the function
print(coding_website)

#output

#The best place to learn to code is with freeCodeCamp!
#freeCodeCamp

Conclusion

And there you have it! You now know the basics of global variables in Python and can tell the differences between local and global variables.

I hope you found this article useful.

You'll start from the basics and learn in an interactive and beginner-friendly way. You'll also build five projects at the end to put into practice and help reinforce what you've learned.

Thanks for reading and happy coding!

Source: https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/python-global-variables-examples/

#python