7 Things to Consider Before Attending a Coding Bootcamp

Coding bootcamps are becoming more and more popular, and for good reason. Just picture yourself earning a six-figure salary, at a great company, with any benefits you can dream up – and all of this only after 3 - 6 months of training.

The bigger coding bootcamps will tout their graduates landing wonderful jobs at Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Apple, and others. It would be hard to find someone who wouldn’t dream about such a work opportunity.

Unfortunately, the majority of the time this is just a dream and nothing more.

As a graduate of a coding bootcamp myself I’d like to give my two cents on the subject. Many of my friends and acquaintances who are considering attending a coding bootcamp have reached out to me, so I wanted to list some things to consider before pulling the trigger on that $10,000+ investment.

#coding bootcamp

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7 Things to Consider Before Attending a Coding Bootcamp
Tyrique  Littel

Tyrique Littel

1604008800

Static Code Analysis: What It Is? How to Use It?

Static code analysis refers to the technique of approximating the runtime behavior of a program. In other words, it is the process of predicting the output of a program without actually executing it.

Lately, however, the term “Static Code Analysis” is more commonly used to refer to one of the applications of this technique rather than the technique itself — program comprehension — understanding the program and detecting issues in it (anything from syntax errors to type mismatches, performance hogs likely bugs, security loopholes, etc.). This is the usage we’d be referring to throughout this post.

“The refinement of techniques for the prompt discovery of error serves as well as any other as a hallmark of what we mean by science.”

  • J. Robert Oppenheimer

Outline

We cover a lot of ground in this post. The aim is to build an understanding of static code analysis and to equip you with the basic theory, and the right tools so that you can write analyzers on your own.

We start our journey with laying down the essential parts of the pipeline which a compiler follows to understand what a piece of code does. We learn where to tap points in this pipeline to plug in our analyzers and extract meaningful information. In the latter half, we get our feet wet, and write four such static analyzers, completely from scratch, in Python.

Note that although the ideas here are discussed in light of Python, static code analyzers across all programming languages are carved out along similar lines. We chose Python because of the availability of an easy to use ast module, and wide adoption of the language itself.

How does it all work?

Before a computer can finally “understand” and execute a piece of code, it goes through a series of complicated transformations:

static analysis workflow

As you can see in the diagram (go ahead, zoom it!), the static analyzers feed on the output of these stages. To be able to better understand the static analysis techniques, let’s look at each of these steps in some more detail:

Scanning

The first thing that a compiler does when trying to understand a piece of code is to break it down into smaller chunks, also known as tokens. Tokens are akin to what words are in a language.

A token might consist of either a single character, like (, or literals (like integers, strings, e.g., 7Bob, etc.), or reserved keywords of that language (e.g, def in Python). Characters which do not contribute towards the semantics of a program, like trailing whitespace, comments, etc. are often discarded by the scanner.

Python provides the tokenize module in its standard library to let you play around with tokens:

Python

1

import io

2

import tokenize

3

4

code = b"color = input('Enter your favourite color: ')"

5

6

for token in tokenize.tokenize(io.BytesIO(code).readline):

7

    print(token)

Python

1

TokenInfo(type=62 (ENCODING),  string='utf-8')

2

TokenInfo(type=1  (NAME),      string='color')

3

TokenInfo(type=54 (OP),        string='=')

4

TokenInfo(type=1  (NAME),      string='input')

5

TokenInfo(type=54 (OP),        string='(')

6

TokenInfo(type=3  (STRING),    string="'Enter your favourite color: '")

7

TokenInfo(type=54 (OP),        string=')')

8

TokenInfo(type=4  (NEWLINE),   string='')

9

TokenInfo(type=0  (ENDMARKER), string='')

(Note that for the sake of readability, I’ve omitted a few columns from the result above — metadata like starting index, ending index, a copy of the line on which a token occurs, etc.)

#code quality #code review #static analysis #static code analysis #code analysis #static analysis tools #code review tips #static code analyzer #static code analysis tool #static analyzer

7 Things to Consider Before Attending a Coding Bootcamp

Coding bootcamps are becoming more and more popular, and for good reason. Just picture yourself earning a six-figure salary, at a great company, with any benefits you can dream up – and all of this only after 3 - 6 months of training.

The bigger coding bootcamps will tout their graduates landing wonderful jobs at Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Apple, and others. It would be hard to find someone who wouldn’t dream about such a work opportunity.

Unfortunately, the majority of the time this is just a dream and nothing more.

As a graduate of a coding bootcamp myself I’d like to give my two cents on the subject. Many of my friends and acquaintances who are considering attending a coding bootcamp have reached out to me, so I wanted to list some things to consider before pulling the trigger on that $10,000+ investment.

#coding bootcamp

Ava Watson

Ava Watson

1600254169

Here Is How Coding Assignment Help Is The Next Big Thing!!

Everything today has become about coding. Like any other language, educators have been changing the pedagogic approach to include this in the curriculum irrespective of what the pupil follows afterwards. Students are also looking for avenues for guidance and coding assignment help.
With the unbridled inclusion of technology, coding has become inevitable and a necessary hazard. Schools have been looking for novel solutions for revamping the learning process and make coding more natural.
Now, the question is why learning coding has become so important? The answer is equally surprising and intriguing. Approximately, 70% of the jobs for coding are outside the domain of technology. So, it is complimenting every subject that could be pursued professionally. This is why everyone wants the best coding assignment help online in Australia.
Experts from a leading assignment writing service gave all the reasons in the world to learn to code. let us find these out!

Interesting facts about coding

  1. Ada Lovelace was an English mathematician who worked on the analytical engine of Charles Babbage in the 19th century. She was the first programmer.
  2. Coding assignment help is needed more now as all the professions need programmers.
  3. The first computer virus was coded in the year 1983 and the first video game in 1961.
  4. A loophole in code is known as a bug which is inspired by an interesting anecdote. Grace Hopper coined this term in the year 1947.
  5. The first programming language FORTRAN or FORmula TRANsalation was developed by IBM.
  6. Among 700 different programming languages, JavaScript is favored most.
  7. Every electrical device is coded to obtain functionality.
  8. The computer understands binary codes. It means that their code is written in One and Zero.
  9. Most of the programming languages follow a similar set of rules. Therefore, anyone who has mastered one can easily learn a new one.
  10. Learning to code in the formative years comes with a bundle of benefits like:-
    • Better cognitive development
    • Enhanced problem-solving
    • Quick computational skills
    • Sophisticated analytical approach
    • Enhanced creativity
    • Better inter-personal skills
    Experts providing coding assignment help have revealed that studies show that after one and a half decades, every second job in Australia will require coding as a necessary skill. Moreover, the gaming industry has surpassed the movie-making industry as a potential job-creating prospect for coders. To overcome any hurdle, you can always find coding assignment help online in Australia!!

#coding #coding assignment help #coding assignment #do my coding assignment #coding assignment help online

Samanta  Moore

Samanta Moore

1621137960

Guidelines for Java Code Reviews

Get a jump-start on your next code review session with this list.

Having another pair of eyes scan your code is always useful and helps you spot mistakes before you break production. You need not be an expert to review someone’s code. Some experience with the programming language and a review checklist should help you get started. We’ve put together a list of things you should keep in mind when you’re reviewing Java code. Read on!

1. Follow Java Code Conventions

2. Replace Imperative Code With Lambdas and Streams

3. Beware of the NullPointerException

4. Directly Assigning References From Client Code to a Field

5. Handle Exceptions With Care

#java #code quality #java tutorial #code analysis #code reviews #code review tips #code analysis tools #java tutorial for beginners #java code review

Houston  Sipes

Houston Sipes

1604088000

How to Find the Stinky Parts of Your Code (Part II)

There are more code smells. Let’s keep changing the aromas. We see several symptoms and situations that make us doubt the quality of our development. Let’s look at some possible solutions.

Most of these smells are just hints of something that might be wrong. They are not rigid rules.

This is part II. Part I can be found here.

Code Smell 06 - Too Clever Programmer

The code is difficult to read, there are tricky with names without semantics. Sometimes using language’s accidental complexity.

_Image Source: NeONBRAND on _Unsplash

Problems

  • Readability
  • Maintainability
  • Code Quality
  • Premature Optimization

Solutions

  1. Refactor the code
  2. Use better names

Examples

  • Optimized loops

Exceptions

  • Optimized code for low-level operations.

Sample Code

Wrong

function primeFactors(n){
	  var f = [],  i = 0, d = 2;  

	  for (i = 0; n >= 2; ) {
	     if(n % d == 0){
	       f[i++]=(d); 
	       n /= d;
	    }
	    else{
	      d++;
	    }     
	  }
	  return f;
	}

Right

function primeFactors(numberToFactor){
	  var factors = [], 
	      divisor = 2,
	      remainder = numberToFactor;

	  while(remainder>=2){
	    if(remainder % divisor === 0){
	       factors.push(divisor); 
	       remainder = remainder/ divisor;
	    }
	    else{
	      divisor++;
	    }     
	  }
	  return factors;
	}

Detection

Automatic detection is possible in some languages. Watch some warnings related to complexity, bad names, post increment variables, etc.

#pixel-face #code-smells #clean-code #stinky-code-parts #refactor-legacy-code #refactoring #stinky-code #common-code-smells