How to Install vnStat and vnStati to Monitor Network Traffic in Linux

VnStat is a console-based network traffic monitoring tool design for Linux and BSD. It will keep a log of the network traffic for selected network interfaces. To generate the logs, vnStat uses the information provided by the kernel.

In other words, it will not sniff the network traffic and will ensure the lite usage of the system resource. To use this software under Linux you will need at least version 2.2 of the kernel series.

Related ArticleVnStat PHP: A Web-Based Interface for Monitoring Network Bandwidth Usage

The latest version of vnStat 2.6 has been released on January 21, 2020, and includes several following features and fixes.

Features
  • Statistics remain available even after system reboots
  • Monitor multiple network interfaces at the same time
  • Multiple output options
  • Sort the data by hour, day, month, week or get the top 10 days
  • Generate png graphic of the output
  • Configure “Months” to follow up with different billing cycles you may have
  • Very light – consumes a really small portion of your system resources
  • Low CPU usage no matter how much traffic you generate
  • You don’t have to be root to use it
  • Select units dynamically (KB, MB, etc)
  • vnStati provides some new options like:
  • -nl / –nolegend (hides the rx/tx legend)
  • –altdate – use alternative date/time text location
  • –headertext – to customize the text in the image header.
  • You can generate output in image format.
  • Customizable options for content positioning and image background color to vnStat.cgi.
  • The interface bandwidth will be automatically detected.
  • Use JSON for output

In this article, we will show you how to install the vnStat and vnStati tool under Linux systems to monitor real-time network traffic.

#monitoring tools #networking commands #linux monitoring #vnstat #linux

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How to Install vnStat and vnStati to Monitor Network Traffic in Linux

How to Install vnStat and vnStati to Monitor Network Traffic in Linux

VnStat is a console-based network traffic monitoring tool design for Linux and BSD. It will keep a log of the network traffic for selected network interfaces. To generate the logs, vnStat uses the information provided by the kernel.

In other words, it will not sniff the network traffic and will ensure the lite usage of the system resource. To use this software under Linux you will need at least version 2.2 of the kernel series.

Related ArticleVnStat PHP: A Web-Based Interface for Monitoring Network Bandwidth Usage

The latest version of vnStat 2.6 has been released on January 21, 2020, and includes several following features and fixes.

Features
  • Statistics remain available even after system reboots
  • Monitor multiple network interfaces at the same time
  • Multiple output options
  • Sort the data by hour, day, month, week or get the top 10 days
  • Generate png graphic of the output
  • Configure “Months” to follow up with different billing cycles you may have
  • Very light – consumes a really small portion of your system resources
  • Low CPU usage no matter how much traffic you generate
  • You don’t have to be root to use it
  • Select units dynamically (KB, MB, etc)
  • vnStati provides some new options like:
  • -nl / –nolegend (hides the rx/tx legend)
  • –altdate – use alternative date/time text location
  • –headertext – to customize the text in the image header.
  • You can generate output in image format.
  • Customizable options for content positioning and image background color to vnStat.cgi.
  • The interface bandwidth will be automatically detected.
  • Use JSON for output

In this article, we will show you how to install the vnStat and vnStati tool under Linux systems to monitor real-time network traffic.

#monitoring tools #networking commands #linux monitoring #vnstat #linux

Carmen  Grimes

Carmen Grimes

1598959140

How to Monitor Third Party API Integrations

Many enterprises and SaaS companies depend on a variety of external API integrations in order to build an awesome customer experience. Some integrations may outsource certain business functionality such as handling payments or search to companies like Stripe and Algolia. You may have integrated other partners which expand the functionality of your product offering, For example, if you want to add real-time alerts to an analytics tool, you might want to integrate the PagerDuty and Slack APIs into your application.

If you’re like most companies though, you’ll soon realize you’re integrating hundreds of different vendors and partners into your app. Any one of them could have performance or functional issues impacting your customer experience. Worst yet, the reliability of an integration may be less visible than your own APIs and backend. If the login functionality is broken, you’ll have many customers complaining they cannot log into your website. However, if your Slack integration is broken, only the customers who added Slack to their account will be impacted. On top of that, since the integration is asynchronous, your customers may not realize the integration is broken until after a few days when they haven’t received any alerts for some time.

How do you ensure your API integrations are reliable and high performing? After all, if you’re selling a feature real-time alerting, you’re alerts better well be real-time and have at least once guaranteed delivery. Dropping alerts because your Slack or PagerDuty integration is unacceptable from a customer experience perspective.

What to monitor

Latency

Specific API integrations that have an exceedingly high latency could be a signal that your integration is about to fail. Maybe your pagination scheme is incorrect or the vendor has not indexed your data in the best way for you to efficiently query.

Latency best practices

Average latency only tells you half the story. An API that consistently takes one second to complete is usually better than an API with high variance. For example if an API only takes 30 milliseconds on average, but 1 out of 10 API calls take up to five seconds, then you have high variance in your customer experience. This is makes it much harder to track down bugs and harder to handle in your customer experience. This is why 90th percentile and 95th percentiles are important to look at.

Reliability

Reliability is a key metric to monitor especially since your integrating APIs that you don’t have control over. What percent of API calls are failing? In order to track reliability, you should have a rigid definition on what constitutes a failure.

Reliability best practices

While any API call that has a response status code in the 4xx or 5xx family may be considered an error, you might have specific business cases where the API appears to successfully complete yet the API call should still be considered a failure. For example, a data API integration that returns no matches or no content consistently could be considered failing even though the status code is always 200 OK. Another API could be returning bogus or incomplete data. Data validation is critical for measuring where the data returned is correct and up to date.

Not every API provider and integration partner follows suggested status code mapping

Availability

While reliability is specific to errors and functional correctness, availability and uptime is a pure infrastructure metric that measures how often a service has an outage, even if temporary. Availability is usually measured as a percentage of uptime per year or number of 9’s.

AVAILABILITY %DOWNTIME PER YEARDOWNTIME PER MONTHDOWNTIME PER WEEKDOWNTIME PER DAY90% (“one nine”)36.53 days73.05 hours16.80 hours2.40 hours99% (“two nines”)3.65 days7.31 hours1.68 hours14.40 minutes99.9% (“three nines”)8.77 hours43.83 minutes10.08 minutes1.44 minutes99.99% (“four nines”)52.60 minutes4.38 minutes1.01 minutes8.64 seconds99.999% (“five nines”)5.26 minutes26.30 seconds6.05 seconds864.00 milliseconds99.9999% (“six nines”)31.56 seconds2.63 seconds604.80 milliseconds86.40 milliseconds99.99999% (“seven nines”)3.16 seconds262.98 milliseconds60.48 milliseconds8.64 milliseconds99.999999% (“eight nines”)315.58 milliseconds26.30 milliseconds6.05 milliseconds864.00 microseconds99.9999999% (“nine nines”)31.56 milliseconds2.63 milliseconds604.80 microseconds86.40 microseconds

Usage

Many API providers are priced on API usage. Even if the API is free, they most likely have some sort of rate limiting implemented on the API to ensure bad actors are not starving out good clients. This means tracking your API usage with each integration partner is critical to understand when your current usage is close to the plan limits or their rate limits.

Usage best practices

It’s recommended to tie usage back to your end-users even if the API integration is quite downstream from your customer experience. This enables measuring the direct ROI of specific integrations and finding trends. For example, let’s say your product is a CRM, and you are paying Clearbit $199 dollars a month to enrich up to 2,500 companies. That is a direct cost you have and is tied to your customer’s usage. If you have a free tier and they are using the most of your Clearbit quota, you may want to reconsider your pricing strategy. Potentially, Clearbit enrichment should be on the paid tiers only to reduce your own cost.

How to monitor API integrations

Monitoring API integrations seems like the correct remedy to stay on top of these issues. However, traditional Application Performance Monitoring (APM) tools like New Relic and AppDynamics focus more on monitoring the health of your own websites and infrastructure. This includes infrastructure metrics like memory usage and requests per minute along with application level health such as appdex scores and latency. Of course, if you’re consuming an API that’s running in someone else’s infrastructure, you can’t just ask your third-party providers to install an APM agent that you have access to. This means you need a way to monitor the third-party APIs indirectly or via some other instrumentation methodology.

#monitoring #api integration #api monitoring #monitoring and alerting #monitoring strategies #monitoring tools #api integrations #monitoring microservices

Servo Node

Servo Node

1621611746

How To Install A Device Driver On Linux- 2 Methods › Servo Node

Itching your head due to missing device driver on your machine? Looking for how to install a device drive on a Linux system? Just switched to a new OS, but hardware is not working well? Check out this article to learn how you can install a missing device drive on your Linux system.

Installing and configuring a driver on a Linux based machine is quite daunting for those who just switched to Linux from Windows/Mac, or trying the new OS with dual boot. The widely used windows and Mac operating system often makes it a user-friendly experience when it comes to install device drivers, but in case of a Linux OS, the user might find some of their hardware is not working. Well, this would not be an issue anymore.

Is it challenging to install a device driver on Linux?
For Windows and Mac OS users, it’s really an easy approach to install any device driver as the OS detects those automatically. Also, the users can download the missing ones from the internet, and just click on a simple wizard to have the driver installed.

However, in case of a Linux platform, the process is not enough simple. One of the most common reason is, Linux is an open-source OS and a number of variations available. So, there can’t be a single method that can suit all Linux platforms, and every of the distribution has its own way regarding how to install a device driver on system.

In addition, most of the default Linux drivers are open-source and integrated in the system, and this makes the installation of missing drivers quite complicated, if not included already with OS. Still, most of the useful drivers are automatically detected with popular Linux distros.

Another reason why installing a device driver on a Linux can be complicated is license policies which technically vary among Linux distributions. Such as Fedora restricts to include drivers which are legally prohibited or violate cyber laws. Even Ubuntu asks its users to prevent using closed hardware.

Means, installing a device driver on a Linux can be a bit challenging, but still here mentioned 2 approaches can be helpful.

Two Methods To Find Drivers & Install on Linux
Approach 1: Using Built-in Interface
Approach 2: Using Command Line

#install linux driver #linux driver install #how to install linux driver

Chet  Lubowitz

Chet Lubowitz

1595855400

How to install PgAdmin 4 on CentOS 8

pgAdmin is the leading graphical Open Source management, development and administration tool for PostgreSQLpgAdmin4 is a rewrite of the popular pgAdmin3 management tool for the PostgreSQL database.

In this tutorial, we are going to show you how to install pgAdmin4 in Server Mode as a web application using httpd and Wsgi module on CentOS 8.

Install pgAdmin4 on CentOS 8

**01-**To install pgAdmin4 on CentOS 8 we need to add an external repository, so execute the following command:

$ sudo rpm -i https://ftp.postgresql.org/pub/pgadmin/pgadmin4/yum/pgadmin4-redhat-repo-1-1.noarch.rpm

02- After we add the pgAdmin4 repository, let’s use the below command to install pgAdmin4 as server mode:

$ sudo dnf install pgadmin4-web

03- Before proceeding with the configuration of pgAdmin4, we need to install policycoreutils tool:

$ dnf install policycoreutils-python-utils  

04- Once we done installing pgAdmin4, we need to configure the pgAdmin4 by setting up the initial pgAdmin user account

#databases #linux #ubuntu #install pgadmin4 #install pgadmin4 centos #pgadmin #pgadmin 4 install #pgadmin 4 install centos #pgadmin4 #pgadmin4 install centos

Servo Node

Servo Node

1623125702

Install VLC Media Player On Ubuntu/Debian Linux › Servo Node

VLC (Video LAN Client) is a well known and widely used open source media player that can run various audio-visual files easily. It’s compatible to run almost all mostly used multi-media formats like .vob, .mp4, .mpg, and so on. Even the media player can be used to stream videos from online or local networks as well.

Although, there’s a number of open-source media players available when it comes to present industry, still the VLC is widely used and is must-have application on Linux distributions as well. While speaking about its versions, the latest version of VLC Media Player is 3.0.14. Check Here For Older Versions.

Best Features Of VLC Player 3.0
Uses a hardware decoding system by default to play 4K and 8K video contents.
10bits and HDR support
360 video and 3D audio support
Audio pass through support for HD audio codecs
Allows to stream videos through Chromecast enabled devices
Browsing or local network media streaming support

How to install VLC Media Player On Linux Distros
Since the VLC Media Player is lashed with all latest features and support, you might love to install the app on your Linux platform. So, here we tell you how to install it on Ubuntu, Debian, and Linux Mint distributions.

In order to install VLC Media Player on specified Linux distros, we have 2 approaches, which are discussed below:

Approach 1: Using VLC PPA Repository

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:videolan/stable-daily
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install vlc

Approach 2: Using Snap Store

For Ubuntu Users

sudo apt update
sudo apt install snapd
sudo snap install vlc

For Debian Users

sudo apt update
sudo apt install snapd
sudo snap install core
sudo snap install vlc

https://servonode.com/install-vlc-media-player-on-ubuntu-debian-linux

#install vlc on ubuntu #install vlc on debian #install vlc on linux mint #how to install vlc in linux