Dominic  Feeney

Dominic Feeney

1648355820

Tsf Lviz: Loss Visualization in TensorFlow

Setup

Refer to the setup instructions

import tensorflow as tf
import numpy

# Import MINST data
import input_data
mnist = input_data.read_data_sets("/tmp/data/", one_hot=True)
Extracting /tmp/data/train-images-idx3-ubyte.gz
Extracting /tmp/data/train-labels-idx1-ubyte.gz
Extracting /tmp/data/t10k-images-idx3-ubyte.gz
Extracting /tmp/data/t10k-labels-idx1-ubyte.gz
# Use Logistic Regression from our previous example

# Parameters
learning_rate = 0.01
training_epochs = 10
batch_size = 100
display_step = 1

# tf Graph Input
x = tf.placeholder("float", [None, 784], name='x') # mnist data image of shape 28*28=784
y = tf.placeholder("float", [None, 10], name='y') # 0-9 digits recognition => 10 classes

# Create model

# Set model weights
W = tf.Variable(tf.zeros([784, 10]), name="weights")
b = tf.Variable(tf.zeros([10]), name="bias")

# Construct model
activation = tf.nn.softmax(tf.matmul(x, W) + b) # Softmax

# Minimize error using cross entropy
cost = -tf.reduce_sum(y*tf.log(activation)) # Cross entropy
optimizer = tf.train.GradientDescentOptimizer(learning_rate).minimize(cost) # Gradient Descent

# Initializing the variables
init = tf.initialize_all_variables()
# Create a summary to monitor cost function
tf.scalar_summary("loss", cost)

# Merge all summaries to a single operator
merged_summary_op = tf.merge_all_summaries()
# Launch the graph
with tf.Session() as sess:
    sess.run(init)

    # Set logs writer into folder /tmp/tensorflow_logs
    summary_writer = tf.train.SummaryWriter('/tmp/tensorflow_logs', graph_def=sess.graph_def)

    # Training cycle
    for epoch in range(training_epochs):
        avg_cost = 0.
        total_batch = int(mnist.train.num_examples/batch_size)
        # Loop over all batches
        for i in range(total_batch):
            batch_xs, batch_ys = mnist.train.next_batch(batch_size)
            # Fit training using batch data
            sess.run(optimizer, feed_dict={x: batch_xs, y: batch_ys})
            # Compute average loss
            avg_cost += sess.run(cost, feed_dict={x: batch_xs, y: batch_ys})/total_batch
            # Write logs at every iteration
            summary_str = sess.run(merged_summary_op, feed_dict={x: batch_xs, y: batch_ys})
            summary_writer.add_summary(summary_str, epoch*total_batch + i)
        # Display logs per epoch step
        if epoch % display_step == 0:
            print "Epoch:", '%04d' % (epoch+1), "cost=", "{:.9f}".format(avg_cost)

    print "Optimization Finished!"

    # Test model
    correct_prediction = tf.equal(tf.argmax(activation, 1), tf.argmax(y, 1))
    # Calculate accuracy
    accuracy = tf.reduce_mean(tf.cast(correct_prediction, "float"))
    print "Accuracy:", accuracy.eval({x: mnist.test.images, y: mnist.test.labels})

Run the command line

tensorboard --logdir=/tmp/tensorflow_logs

Open http://localhost:6006/ into your web browser

# Loss per minibatch step

Link: https://nbviewer.org/github/TarrySingh/Machine-Learning-Tutorials/blob/master/deep-learning/tensor-flow-examples/notebooks/5_ui/loss_visualization.ipynb

#tensorflow  #python 

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Tsf Lviz: Loss Visualization in TensorFlow
Uriah  Dietrich

Uriah Dietrich

1615957260

Ultimate Guide To Loss functions In Tensorflow Keras API With Python Implementation

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Ledger App Khatabook Helps SMBs To Keep Up With India’s Digital Aspirations

We have already covered the PyTorch loss functions implementations in our previous article, now we are heading forward to the other libraries that have been used more widely than PyTorch, today we are going to discuss the loss functions supported by the Tensorflow library, there are almost 15 different kinds of loss functions supported by TensorFlow, some of them are available in both Class and functions format you can call them as a class method or as a function.

The class handles enable you to pass configuration arguments to the constructor (e.g. loss_fn = CategoricalCrossentropy(from_logits=True)), and they perform reduction by default when used in a standalone way they are defined separately, all the loss functions are available under Keras module, exactly like in PyTorch all the loss functions were available in Torch module, you can access Tensorflow loss functions by calling tf.keras.losses method.

Table of contents
Tensorflow Keras Loss functions
Implementation

  1. Binary Cross-Entropy(BCE) loss
  2. Categorical Crossentropy loss
  3. Sparse Categorical Crossentropy loss
  4. Poisson loss
  5. Kullback-Leibler Divergence loss
    KL(P || Q) = – sum x in X P(x) * log(Q(x) / P(x))
  6. Mean Squared Error(MSE)
  7. MeanAbsoluteError
  8. Mean Absolute Percentage Error(MAPE)
  9. Mean Squared Logarithmic Error(MSLE)
  10. CosineSimilarity loss
  11. Huber loss
  12. LogCosh loss
  13. Hinge loss
  14. Squared Hinge loss
  15. CategoricalHinge loss
    Conclusion
    Read more:

#uncategorized #keras loss functions #python for data science #tensorflow #tensorflow loss fucntions

Dominic  Feeney

Dominic Feeney

1648355820

Tsf Lviz: Loss Visualization in TensorFlow

Setup

Refer to the setup instructions

import tensorflow as tf
import numpy

# Import MINST data
import input_data
mnist = input_data.read_data_sets("/tmp/data/", one_hot=True)
Extracting /tmp/data/train-images-idx3-ubyte.gz
Extracting /tmp/data/train-labels-idx1-ubyte.gz
Extracting /tmp/data/t10k-images-idx3-ubyte.gz
Extracting /tmp/data/t10k-labels-idx1-ubyte.gz
# Use Logistic Regression from our previous example

# Parameters
learning_rate = 0.01
training_epochs = 10
batch_size = 100
display_step = 1

# tf Graph Input
x = tf.placeholder("float", [None, 784], name='x') # mnist data image of shape 28*28=784
y = tf.placeholder("float", [None, 10], name='y') # 0-9 digits recognition => 10 classes

# Create model

# Set model weights
W = tf.Variable(tf.zeros([784, 10]), name="weights")
b = tf.Variable(tf.zeros([10]), name="bias")

# Construct model
activation = tf.nn.softmax(tf.matmul(x, W) + b) # Softmax

# Minimize error using cross entropy
cost = -tf.reduce_sum(y*tf.log(activation)) # Cross entropy
optimizer = tf.train.GradientDescentOptimizer(learning_rate).minimize(cost) # Gradient Descent

# Initializing the variables
init = tf.initialize_all_variables()
# Create a summary to monitor cost function
tf.scalar_summary("loss", cost)

# Merge all summaries to a single operator
merged_summary_op = tf.merge_all_summaries()
# Launch the graph
with tf.Session() as sess:
    sess.run(init)

    # Set logs writer into folder /tmp/tensorflow_logs
    summary_writer = tf.train.SummaryWriter('/tmp/tensorflow_logs', graph_def=sess.graph_def)

    # Training cycle
    for epoch in range(training_epochs):
        avg_cost = 0.
        total_batch = int(mnist.train.num_examples/batch_size)
        # Loop over all batches
        for i in range(total_batch):
            batch_xs, batch_ys = mnist.train.next_batch(batch_size)
            # Fit training using batch data
            sess.run(optimizer, feed_dict={x: batch_xs, y: batch_ys})
            # Compute average loss
            avg_cost += sess.run(cost, feed_dict={x: batch_xs, y: batch_ys})/total_batch
            # Write logs at every iteration
            summary_str = sess.run(merged_summary_op, feed_dict={x: batch_xs, y: batch_ys})
            summary_writer.add_summary(summary_str, epoch*total_batch + i)
        # Display logs per epoch step
        if epoch % display_step == 0:
            print "Epoch:", '%04d' % (epoch+1), "cost=", "{:.9f}".format(avg_cost)

    print "Optimization Finished!"

    # Test model
    correct_prediction = tf.equal(tf.argmax(activation, 1), tf.argmax(y, 1))
    # Calculate accuracy
    accuracy = tf.reduce_mean(tf.cast(correct_prediction, "float"))
    print "Accuracy:", accuracy.eval({x: mnist.test.images, y: mnist.test.labels})

Run the command line

tensorboard --logdir=/tmp/tensorflow_logs

Open http://localhost:6006/ into your web browser

# Loss per minibatch step

Link: https://nbviewer.org/github/TarrySingh/Machine-Learning-Tutorials/blob/master/deep-learning/tensor-flow-examples/notebooks/5_ui/loss_visualization.ipynb

#tensorflow  #python 

Arvel  Parker

Arvel Parker

1591177440

Visual Analytics and Advanced Data Visualization

Visual Analytics is the scientific visualization to emerge an idea to present data in such a way so that it could be easily determined by anyone.

It gives an idea to the human mind to directly interact with interactive visuals which could help in making decisions easy and fast.

Visual Analytics basically breaks the complex data in a simple way.

The human brain is fast and is built to process things faster. So Data visualization provides its way to make things easy for students, researchers, mathematicians, scientists e

#blogs #data visualization #business analytics #data visualization techniques #visual analytics #visualizing ml models

5 Steps to Passing the TensorFlow Developer Certificate

Deep Learning is one of the most in demand skills on the market and TensorFlow is the most popular DL Framework. One of the best ways in my opinion to show that you are comfortable with DL fundaments is taking this TensorFlow Developer Certificate. I completed mine last week and now I am giving tips to those who want to validate your DL skills and I hope you love Memes!

  1. Do the DeepLearning.AI TensorFlow Developer Professional Certificate Course on Coursera Laurence Moroney and by Andrew Ng.

2. Do the course questions in parallel in PyCharm.

#tensorflow #steps to passing the tensorflow developer certificate #tensorflow developer certificate #certificate #5 steps to passing the tensorflow developer certificate #passing

Arvel  Parker

Arvel Parker

1591184760

Visual Analytics Services for Data-Driven Decision Making

Visual analytics is the process of collecting, examining complex and large data sets (structured or unstructured) to get useful information to draw conclusions about the datasets and visualize the data or information in the form of interactive visual interfaces and graphical manner.

Data analytics is usually accomplished by extracting or collecting data from different data sources in the form of numbers, statistics and overall activity of any organization, with different deep learning and analytics tools, which is then processed using data visualization software and presented in the form of graphical charts, figures, and bars.

In today technology world, data are reproduced in incredible rate and amount. Visual Analytics helps the world to make the vast and complex amount of data useful and readable. Visual Analytics is the process to collect and store the data at a faster rate than analyze the data and make it helpful.

As human brain process visual content better than it processes plain text. So using advanced visual interfaces, humans may directly interact with the data analysis capabilities of today’s computers and allow them to make well-informed decisions in complex situations.

It allows you to create beautiful, interactive dashboards or reports that are immediately available on the web or a mobile device. The tool has a Data Explorer that makes it easy for the novice analyst to create forecasts, decision trees, or other fancy statistical methods.

#blogs #data visualization #data visualization tools #visual analytics #visualizing ml models