Castore  DeRose

Castore DeRose

1575740009

Things NOT To Do when Build React applications

10 Things NOT To Do When Building React Applications. Unfortunately nothing is perfect in life, and react is no different.

React comes with its own set of gotchas–some of it potentially becoming a severe problem to your applications if you don’t take care of them now.

Here are ___ Things NOT To Do When Building React Applications:

1. Spending Too Much Time In Your Own Private World

If you’re spending too much time coding everything in your project and not taking some time to read on what’s happening in the community, you might be at risk of coding bad practices that have been reported in the community. And you might be at risk of continuing to code those bad practices until you did it 20 times before you finally got the chance to find out on a medium post that it was bad.

When that happens, now you have to go back and refactor those 20 code implementations because you found out too late while everybody else is ahead of you and moved on with newer news.

When react released hooks, I was so excited and began building a bunch of mini projects to play with these new toys that everybody was all hyped up about. After reading a couple sources that hooks were going to be stable I began implementing these more seriously to my projects. I was using useState and useEffect like a boss everywhere.

2. Using .bind (Not class component constructors)

I think the majority of us react developers are aware that we should .bind our class methods if we want to reference this to access their own class instance inside their methods. Unless you’re using a transpiler to transpile your class properties and methods.

That’s great and I agree to prefer declaring them with arrow functions.

But this part I am going to talk about isn’t about that. It’s about inline functions–or functions that is defined within the render method of a react component and passed down as a prop to a child component.

When inline functions are defined in the render method, react begins to designate a new function instance each time the component re-renders. This is known to cause performance issues due to wasteful re-rendering

Let’s take a look at this example:

const ShowMeTheMoney = () => {
  const [money, setMoney] = useState(0)

  const showThemTheMoney = (money) => {
    setMoney(money)
  }

  const hideTheMoney = () => {
    setMoney(null)
  }

  const sayWhereTheMoneyIs = (msg) => {
    console.log(msg)
  }

  return (
    <div>
      <h4>Where is the money?</h4>
      <hr />
      <div style={{ display: 'flex', alignItems: 'center' }}>
        <SomeCustomButton
          type="button"
          onClick={() => sayWhereTheMoneyIs("I don't know")}
        >
          I'll tell you
        </SomeCustomButton>{' '}
        <SomeCustomButton type="button" onClick={() => showThemTheMoney(0.05)}>
          I'll show you
        </SomeCustomButton>
      </div>
    </div>
  )
}

We know that onClick={() => sayWhereTheMoneyIs("I don't know")} and onClick={() => showThemTheMoney(0.05)} are inline functions.

I’ve seen a couple of tutorials (including one from Udemy) that encourage doing this:

return (
  <div>
    <h4>Where is the money?</h4>
    <hr />
    <div style={{ display: 'flex', alignItems: 'center' }}>
      <SomeCustomButton
        type="button"
        onClick={sayWhereTheMoneyIs.bind(null, "I don't know")}
      >
        I'll tell you
      </SomeCustomButton>{' '}
      <SomeCustomButton
        type="button"
        onClick={showThemTheMoney.bind(null, 0.05)}
      >
        I'll show you
      </SomeCustomButton>
    </div>
  </div>
)

This seems like it caches the reference thus avoiding unnecessary re-renders because they aren’t using arrow inline functions in the render method, but they are actually still creating new functions on each render phase!

Some of us may have already known that if we’d been following the community in the react ecosystem during the times when class components were trending.

However, since react hooks were released the talks about .bind have been swaying away since class components are becoming less popular—and usually, when .bind was the topic to talk about, it’d usually be about binding class methods. And to addon to that, these examples above aren’t even binding to class methods at all, so that makes it even harder to notice the consequences here if you aren’t careful enough.

The newcomers should especially be aware of this anti-pattern!

3. Passing Dynamic Values As Keys to Children

Have you ever come across a time where you felt forced to provide unique keys to children that were being mapped over?

It’s good to provide unique keys:

const Cereal = ({ items, ...otherProps }) => {
  const indexHalf = Math.floor(items.length / 2)
  const items1 = items.slice(0, indexHalf)
  const items2 = items.slice(indexHalf)
  return (
    <>
      <ul>
        {items1.map(({ to, label }) => (
          <li key={to}>
            <Link to={to}>{label}</Link>
          </li>
        ))}
      </ul>
      <ul>
        {items2.map(({ to, label }) => (
          <li key={to}>
            <Link to={to}>{label}</Link>
          </li>
        ))}
      </ul>
    </>
  )
}

Now pretend that some to values in items1 happen to be the same as some in items2.

I’ve seen that when some people want to refactor a similar component to this, they’d end up doing something like this:

import { generateRandomUniqueKey } from 'utils/generating'

const Cereal = ({ items, ...otherProps }) => {
  const indexHalf = Math.floor(items.length / 2)
  const items1 = items.slice(0, indexHalf)
  const items2 = items.slice(indexHalf)
  return (
    <>
      <ul>
        {items1.map(({ to, label }) => (
          <li key={generateRandomUniqueKey()}>
            <Link to={to}>{label}</Link>
          </li>
        ))}
      </ul>
      <ul>
        {items2.map(({ to, label }) => (
          <li key={generateRandomUniqueKey()}>
            <Link to={to}>{label}</Link>
          </li>
        ))}
      </ul>
    </>
  )
}

This does get the job done with providing unique keys to each children. But there are two things wrong:

  1. Not only are we making react do unnecessary work with generating unique values, but we’re also ending up recreating all of our nodes on every render because the key is different each time.
  2. The key concept in react is all about identity. And to identify which component is which, the keys do need to be unique, but not like that.

Something like this would have become a little better:

import { generateRandomUniqueKey } from 'utils/generating'

const Cereal = ({ items, ...otherProps }) => {
  const indexHalf = Math.floor(items.length / 2)
  const items1 = items.slice(0, indexHalf)
  const items2 = items.slice(indexHalf)
  return (
    <>
      <ul>
        {items1.map(({ to, label }) => (
          <li key={`items1_${to}`}>
            <Link to={to}>{label}</Link>
          </li>
        ))}
      </ul>
      <ul>
        {items2.map(({ to, label }) => (
          <li key={`items2_${to}`}>
            <Link to={to}>{label}</Link>
          </li>
        ))}
      </ul>
    </>
  )
}

Now we should feel confident that each item will have their own unique key value while preserving their identity.

4. Declaring Default Parameters Over Null

I was once guilty of spending a good amount of time debugging something similar to this:

const SomeComponent = ({ items = [], todaysDate, tomorrowsDate }) => {
  const [someState, setSomeState] = useState(null)

  return (
    <div>
      <h2>Today is {todaysDate}</h2>
      <small>And tomorrow is {tomorrowsDate}</small>
      <hr />
      {items.map((item, index) => (
        <span key={`item_${index}`}>{item.email}</span>
      ))}
    </div>
  )
}

const App = ({ dates, ...otherProps }) => {
  let items
  if (dates) {
    items = dates ? dates.map((d) => new Date(d).toLocaleDateString()) : null
  }

  return (
    <div>
      <SomeComponent {...otherProps} items={items} />
    </div>
  )
}

Inside our App component, if dates ends up being falsey, it will be initialized with null.

And if we run the code–if you’re like me, our instincts tell us that items should be initialized to an empty array by default if it was a falsey value. But our app will crash when dates is falsey because items is null. What?

Default function parameters allow named parameters to become initialized with default values if no value or undefined is passed!

In our case, even though null is falsey, it’s still a value!

This mistake caused me a lot of time to debug, especially when the null value was coming from the redux reducers! Ugh.

5. Leaving Repetitive Code Untouched

it can be tempting to copy and paste code when you’re being rushed to push out a fix as it can sometimes be the quickest solution.

Here is an example of repetitive code:

const SomeComponent = () => (
  <Body noBottom>
    <Header center>Title</Header>
    <Divider />
    <Background grey>
      <Section height={500}>
        <Grid spacing={16} container>
          <Grid xs={12} sm={6} item>
            <div className={classes.groupsHeader}>
              <Header center>Groups</Header>
            </div>
          </Grid>
          <Grid xs={12} sm={6} item>
            <div>
              <img src={photos.groups} alt="" className={classes.img} />
            </div>
          </Grid>
        </Grid>
      </Section>
    </Background>
    <Background grey>
      <Section height={500}>
        <Grid spacing={16} container>
          <Grid xs={12} sm={6} item>
            <div className={classes.labsHeader}>
              <Header center>Labs</Header>
            </div>
          </Grid>
          <Grid xs={12} sm={6} item>
            <div>
              <img src={photos.labs} alt="" className={classes.img} />
            </div>
          </Grid>
        </Grid>
      </Section>
    </Background>
    <Background grey>
      <Section height={300}>
        <Grid spacing={16} container>
          <Grid xs={12} sm={6} item>
            <div className={classes.partnersHeader}>
              <Header center>Partners</Header>
            </div>
          </Grid>
          <Grid xs={12} sm={6} item>
            <div>
              <img src={photos.partners} alt="" className={classes.img} />
            </div>
          </Grid>
        </Grid>
      </Section>
    </Background>
  </Body>
)

Now’s a good time to begin thinking about how to abstract these components in a way where they can be reused multiple times without changing the implementation. If there was a styling issue in one of the Grid components relative to their surrounding _Grid container_s, you’d have to manually change every single one of them.

A better way to have this coded is probably abstracting out the repeated parts, and passing in the props that are slightly different:

const SectionContainer = ({
  bgProps,
  height = 500,
  header,
  headerProps,
  imgProps,
}) => (
  <Background {...bgProps}>
    <Section height={height}>
      <Grid spacing={16} container>
        <Grid xs={12} sm={6} item>
          <div {...headerProps}>
            <Header center>{header}</Header>
          </div>
        </Grid>
        <Grid xs={12} sm={6} item>
          <div>
            <img {...imgProps} />
          </div>
        </Grid>
      </Grid>
    </Section>
  </Background>
)

const SomeComponent = () => (
  <Body noBottom>
    <Header center>Title</Header>
    <Divider />
    <SectionContainer
      header="Groups"
      headerProps={{ className: classes.groupsHeader }}
      imgProps={{ src: photos.groups, className: classes.img }}
    />
    <SectionContainer
      bgProps={{ grey: true }}
      header="Labs"
      headerProps={{ className: classes.labsHeader }}
      imgProps={{ src: photos.labs, className: classes.img }}
    />
    <SectionContainer
      height={300}
      header="Partners"
      headerProps={{ className: classes.partnersHeader }}
      imgProps={{ src: photos.partners, className: classes.img }}
    />
  </Body>
)

So now if your boss ends up changing his mind and wants to make all of these sections about 300px in height, you only have one place to change it.

Now i’m not trying to recommend a solution like this if we were looking to make a component supporting several use cases, this is for specific uses where we know it is going to be re-used only in that environment. A more dynamic re-usable solution for SectionContainer that support multiple use cases would have probably been coded to be more generic like this, still without changing the implementation:

const SectionContainer = ({
  bgProps,
  sectionProps,
  children,
  gridContainerProps,
  gridColumnLeftProps,
  gridColumnRightProps,
  columnLeft,
  columnRight,
}) => (
  <Background {...bgProps}>
    <Section {...sectionProps}>
      {children || (
        <Grid spacing={16} container {...gridContainerProps}>
          <Grid xs={12} sm={6} item {...gridColumnLeftProps}>
            {columnLeft}
          </Grid>
          <Grid xs={12} sm={6} item {...gridColumnRightProps}>
            {columnRight}
          </Grid>
        </Grid>
      )}
    </Section>
  </Background>
)

That way we now allow the developer to optionally extend any part of the components as needed while retaining the underlying implementation.

6. Initializing Props in the constructor

When you initialize state in the constructor:

import React from 'react'

class App extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props)
    this.state = {
      items: props.items,
    }
  }
}

You might run into bugs. That’s because the constructor is only called once, which is the time the component first gets created.

The next time you try to change props, the state will retain its previous value because the constructor won’t be getting called in re-renders.

If you haven’t come across this problem yet, I hope this helps you!

And if you were wondering how to make the props synchronize with the state, a better approach would be something like this:

import React from 'react'

class App extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props)
    // Initialize the state on mount
    this.state = {
      items: props.items,
    }
  }

  // Keep the state in sync with props in further updates
  componentDidUpdate = (prevProps) => {
    const items = []
    // after  calculations comparing prevProps with this.props
    if (...) {
      this.setState({ items })
    }
  }
}

7. Conditional Rendering with &&

A common gotcha when conditionally rendering components is using the && operator.

React will attempt to render anything you provide as the alternative output if a condition doesn’t meet its requirements. As such, when we look at this:

const App = ({ items = [] }) => (
  <div>
    <h2>Here are your items:</h2>
    <div>
      {items.length &&
        items.map((item) => <div key={item.label}>{item.label}</div>)}
    </div>
  </div>
)

This will actually render a number 0 on the screen when items.length is empty. JavaScript considers the number 0 as a falsey value, so when items is an empty array, the && operator won’t be evaluating the expression to the right of it, and will just return the first value.

What I usually do if I want to keep the syntax is using double negation:

const App = ({ items = [] }) => (
  <div>
    <h2>Here are your items:</h2>
    <div>
      {!!items.length &&
        items.map((item) => <div key={item.label}>{item.label}</div>)}
    </div>
  </div>
)

That way, if items is an empty array, react will not render anything on the screen if the evaluated output is a boolean.

8. Not Spreading Previous States

Something that can occasionally creep up to my list of bugs comes from carelessly implementing state update logic.

A recent situation involved react hooks, specifically a useReducer implementation. Here’s a basic example of this becoming an issue:

const something = (state) => {
  let newState = { ...state }
  const indexPanda = newState.items.indexOf('panda')
  if (indexPanda !== -1) {
    newState.items.splice(indexPanda, 1)
  }
  return newState
}

const initialState = {
  items: [],
}

const reducer = (state, action) => {
  switch (action.type) {
    case 'add-item':
      return { ...state, items: [...something(state).items, action.item] }
    case 'clear':
      return { ...initialState }
    default:
      return state
  }
}

When the something function invokes and copies the state over, the underlying items property has not changed. When we mutate it using .splice, this mutates state.items and will introduce bugs.

Be especially weary about this in larger code. We would all probably get passed a small example like the above, but when things get messy, this always has to be kept in mind at all times as it is easy to forget, especially when you’re being pressured to ship code to production!

9. Not Explicitly Passing Down Props To Child Components

It’s a generally recommended practice to be explicit in the props you pass down to child components.

There are a couple good reasons for this:

  1. Easier Debugging Experience

    1. You as a developer know what is being passed to each child.
    2. Other developers will also know that and will have an easier time reading the code
  2. Easier to Understand What a Component Will Do

    1. Another great thing about passing down props explicity is that when you do this, it’s also documenting your code in a way where everyone understands without even needing a formal documentation. And that saves time!
  3. There will be fewer props needed in order to determine if the component should re-render or not.

Although there can be some pretty neat use cases for spreading all the props.

For example, if a parent quickly needed one or two things before passing the props down to child components, it can be easy for them (and you) to do so:

const Parent = (props) => {
  if (props.user && props.user.email) {
    // Fire some redux action to update something globally that another
    //    component might need to know about
  }

  // Continue on with the app
  return <Child {...props} />
}

Just make sure you don’t find yourself in a situation like this:

<ModalComponent
  open={aFormIsOpened}
  onClose={() => closeModal(formName)}
  arial-labelledby={`${formName}-modal`}
  arial-describedby={`${formName}-modal`}
  classes={{
    root: cx(classes.modal, { [classes.dialog]: shouldUseDialog }),
    ...additionalDialogClasses,
  }}
  disableAutoFocus
>
  <div>
    {!dialog.opened && (
      <ModalFormRoot
        animieId={animieId}
        alreadySubmitted={alreadySubmitted}
        academy={academy}
        user={user}
        clearSignature={clearSignature}
        closeModal={closeModal}
        closeImageViewer={closeImageViewer}
        dialog={dialog}
        fetchAcademyMember={fetchAcademyMember}
        formName={formName}
        formId={formId}
        getCurrentValues={getCurrentValues}
        header={header}
        hideActions={formName === 'signup'}
        hideClear={formName === 'review'}
        movieId={movie}
        tvId={tvId}
        openPdfViewer={openPdfViewer}
        onSubmit={onSubmit}
        onTogglerClick={onToggle}
        seniorMember={seniorMember}
        seniorMemberId={seniorMemberId}
        pdfViewer={pdfViewer}
        screenViewRef={screenViewRef}
        screenRef={screenRef}
        screenInputRef={screenInputRef}
        updateSignupFormValues={updateSignupFormValues}
        updateSigninFormValues={updateSigninFormValues}
        updateCommentFormValues={updateCommentFormValues}
        updateReplyFormValues={updateReplyFormValues}
        validateFormId={validateFormId}
        waitingForPreviousForm={waitingForPreviousForm}
        initialValues={getCurrentValues(formName)}
        uploadStatus={uploadStatus}
        uploadError={uploadError}
        setUploadError={setUploadError}
        filterRolesFalseys={filterRolesFalseys}
      />
    )}
  </div>
</ModalComponent>

And if you do, consider splitting the component parts to separate components so that it’s cleaner and more customizable.

10. Prop Drilling

Passing down props to multiple child components is what they call a “code smell”.

If you don’t know what prop drilling is, it means when a parent is passing down props to multiple levels of components deep down the tree.

Now the problem there isn’t the parent nor the child. They should keep their implementation the same. It’s the components in the middle that might become an issue in your react apps.

That’s because now the components in the middle are tightly coupled and are exposed to too much information that they don’t even need. The worst part is that when the parent re-renders, the components in the middle will also re-render, making a domino effect to all the child components down the chain.

A good solution is to use context instead. Or alternatively, redux for props (which consequently are going to be serialized however).

Conclusion

That concludes the end of this post :) I hope you found this article helpful to you, and make sure to follow me on medium for future posts! Thank you !

#Javascript #React #Webdev

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Things NOT To Do when Build React applications
Autumn  Blick

Autumn Blick

1598839687

How native is React Native? | React Native vs Native App Development

If you are undertaking a mobile app development for your start-up or enterprise, you are likely wondering whether to use React Native. As a popular development framework, React Native helps you to develop near-native mobile apps. However, you are probably also wondering how close you can get to a native app by using React Native. How native is React Native?

In the article, we discuss the similarities between native mobile development and development using React Native. We also touch upon where they differ and how to bridge the gaps. Read on.

A brief introduction to React Native

Let’s briefly set the context first. We will briefly touch upon what React Native is and how it differs from earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is a popular JavaScript framework that Facebook has created. You can use this open-source framework to code natively rendering Android and iOS mobile apps. You can use it to develop web apps too.

Facebook has developed React Native based on React, its JavaScript library. The first release of React Native came in March 2015. At the time of writing this article, the latest stable release of React Native is 0.62.0, and it was released in March 2020.

Although relatively new, React Native has acquired a high degree of popularity. The “Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2019” report identifies it as the 8th most loved framework. Facebook, Walmart, and Bloomberg are some of the top companies that use React Native.

The popularity of React Native comes from its advantages. Some of its advantages are as follows:

  • Performance: It delivers optimal performance.
  • Cross-platform development: You can develop both Android and iOS apps with it. The reuse of code expedites development and reduces costs.
  • UI design: React Native enables you to design simple and responsive UI for your mobile app.
  • 3rd party plugins: This framework supports 3rd party plugins.
  • Developer community: A vibrant community of developers support React Native.

Why React Native is fundamentally different from earlier hybrid frameworks

Are you wondering whether React Native is just another of those hybrid frameworks like Ionic or Cordova? It’s not! React Native is fundamentally different from these earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is very close to native. Consider the following aspects as described on the React Native website:

  • Access to many native platforms features: The primitives of React Native render to native platform UI. This means that your React Native app will use many native platform APIs as native apps would do.
  • Near-native user experience: React Native provides several native components, and these are platform agnostic.
  • The ease of accessing native APIs: React Native uses a declarative UI paradigm. This enables React Native to interact easily with native platform APIs since React Native wraps existing native code.

Due to these factors, React Native offers many more advantages compared to those earlier hybrid frameworks. We now review them.

#android app #frontend #ios app #mobile app development #benefits of react native #is react native good for mobile app development #native vs #pros and cons of react native #react mobile development #react native development #react native experience #react native framework #react native ios vs android #react native pros and cons #react native vs android #react native vs native #react native vs native performance #react vs native #why react native #why use react native

Franz  Becker

Franz Becker

1651604400

React Starter Kit: Build Web Apps with React, Relay and GraphQL.

React Starter Kit — "isomorphic" web app boilerplate   

React Starter Kit is an opinionated boilerplate for web development built on top of Node.js, Express, GraphQL and React, containing modern web development tools such as Webpack, Babel and Browsersync. Helping you to stay productive following the best practices. A solid starting point for both professionals and newcomers to the industry.

See getting started guide, demo, docs, roadmap  |  Join #react-starter-kit chat room on Gitter  |  Visit our sponsors:

 

Hiring

Getting Started

Customization

The master branch of React Starter Kit doesn't include a Flux implementation or any other advanced integrations. Nevertheless, we have some integrations available to you in feature branches that you can use either as a reference or merge into your project:

You can see status of most reasonable merge combination as PRs labeled as TRACKING

If you think that any of these features should be on master, or vice versa, some features should removed from the master branch, please let us know. We love your feedback!

Comparison

 

React Starter Kit

React Static Boilerplate

ASP.NET Core Starter Kit

App typeIsomorphic (universal)Single-page applicationSingle-page application
Frontend
LanguageJavaScript (ES2015+, JSX)JavaScript (ES2015+, JSX)JavaScript (ES2015+, JSX)
LibrariesReact, History, Universal RouterReact, History, ReduxReact, History, Redux
RoutesImperative (functional)DeclarativeDeclarative, cross-stack
Backend
LanguageJavaScript (ES2015+, JSX)n/aC#, F#
LibrariesNode.js, Express, Sequelize,
GraphQL
n/aASP.NET Core, EF Core,
ASP.NET Identity
SSRYesn/an/a
Data APIGraphQLn/aWeb API

Backers

♥ React Starter Kit? Help us keep it alive by donating funds to cover project expenses via OpenCollective or Bountysource!

lehneres Tarkan Anlar Morten Olsen Adam David Ernst Zane Hitchcox  

How to Contribute

Anyone and everyone is welcome to contribute to this project. The best way to start is by checking our open issues, submit a new issue or feature request, participate in discussions, upvote or downvote the issues you like or dislike, send pull requests.

Learn More

Related Projects

  • GraphQL Starter Kit — Boilerplate for building data APIs with Node.js, JavaScript (via Babel) and GraphQL
  • Membership Database — SQL schema boilerplate for user accounts, profiles, roles, and auth claims
  • Babel Starter Kit — Boilerplate for authoring JavaScript/React.js libraries

Support

License

Copyright © 2014-present Kriasoft, LLC. This source code is licensed under the MIT license found in the LICENSE.txt file. The documentation to the project is licensed under the CC BY-SA 4.0 license.


Author: kriasoft
Source Code: https://github.com/kriasoft/react-starter-kit
License: MIT License

#graphql #react 

Aria Barnes

Aria Barnes

1627031571

React 18: Things You Need To Know About React JS Latest Version

The most awaited version of React 18 is finally out now. Its team has finally revealed the alpha version of React 18 and its plan, though the official launch is still pending. This time the team has tried something and released the plan first to know their user feedback because the last version of React 17 was not that much appreciated among developers.

According to Front-end Frameworks SurveyReact JS has ranked top in the list of most loved frameworks. Thus, the developer communities expect a bit higher from the framework, so they are less appreciative of the previous launch.
ReactJS stats.pngSo, this time React 18 will be a blast. For beginners, the team is working on a new approach. They have called a panel of experts, library authors, educators, and developers to take part in a working group. Initially, it will be a small group.

I am not a part of this release but following the team on their GitHub discussion group. After gathering the information from there, I can say that they have planned much better this time.

React 17 was not able to meet the developer's community. The focus was all primarily centered on making it easier to upgrade React itself. React 18 release will be the opposite. It has a lot of features for react developers.

Read more here: React 18: Things You Need To Know About React JS Latest Version

#hire react js developers #hire react js developers india #react developers india #react js developer #react developer #hire react developers

Aubrey  Price

Aubrey Price

1589722410

Build a simple React Native Pokemon app with React-Navigation

As we start learning new technologies we want to start building something or work on a simple project to get a better understanding of the technology. So, let’s build this simple app.
For this app, we will be using PokeApi to get our pokemon data, and also we will be using Hooks. I am using pokemondb for pokemon sprites. It’s just a personal preference you can use whatever you want.

#react-native #react-native-app #react-navigation #react-native-development #react

Mathew Rini

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How to Select and Hire the Best React JS and React Native Developers?

Since March 2020 reached 556 million monthly downloads have increased, It shows that React JS has been steadily growing. React.js also provides a desirable amount of pliancy and efficiency for developing innovative solutions with interactive user interfaces. It’s no surprise that an increasing number of businesses are adopting this technology. How do you select and recruit React.js developers who will propel your project forward? How much does a React developer make? We’ll bring you here all the details you need.

What is React.js?

Facebook built and maintains React.js, an open-source JavaScript library for designing development tools. React.js is used to create single-page applications (SPAs) that can be used in conjunction with React Native to develop native cross-platform apps.

React vs React Native

  • React Native is a platform that uses a collection of mobile-specific components provided by the React kit, while React.js is a JavaScript-based library.
  • React.js and React Native have similar syntax and workflows, but their implementation is quite different.
  • React Native is designed to create native mobile apps that are distinct from those created in Objective-C or Java. React, on the other hand, can be used to develop web apps, hybrid and mobile & desktop applications.
  • React Native, in essence, takes the same conceptual UI cornerstones as standard iOS and Android apps and assembles them using React.js syntax to create a rich mobile experience.

What is the Average React Developer Salary?

In the United States, the average React developer salary is $94,205 a year, or $30-$48 per hour, This is one of the highest among JavaScript developers. The starting salary for junior React.js developers is $60,510 per year, rising to $112,480 for senior roles.

* React.js Developer Salary by Country

  • United States- $120,000
  • Canada - $110,000
  • United Kingdom - $71,820
  • The Netherlands $49,095
  • Spain - $35,423.00
  • France - $44,284
  • Ukraine - $28,990
  • India - $9,843
  • Sweden - $55,173
  • Singapore - $43,801

In context of software developer wage rates, the United States continues to lead. In high-tech cities like San Francisco and New York, average React developer salaries will hit $98K and $114per year, overall.

However, the need for React.js and React Native developer is outpacing local labour markets. As a result, many businesses have difficulty locating and recruiting them locally.

It’s no surprise that for US and European companies looking for professional and budget engineers, offshore regions like India are becoming especially interesting. This area has a large number of app development companies, a good rate with quality, and a good pool of React.js front-end developers.

As per Linkedin, the country’s IT industry employs over a million React specialists. Furthermore, for the same or less money than hiring a React.js programmer locally, you may recruit someone with much expertise and a broader technical stack.

How to Hire React.js Developers?

  • Conduct thorough candidate research, including portfolios and areas of expertise.
  • Before you sit down with your interviewing panel, do some homework.
  • Examine the final outcome and hire the ideal candidate.

Why is React.js Popular?

React is a very strong framework. React.js makes use of a powerful synchronization method known as Virtual DOM, which compares the current page architecture to the expected page architecture and updates the appropriate components as long as the user input.

React is scalable. it utilises a single language, For server-client side, and mobile platform.

React is steady.React.js is completely adaptable, which means it seldom, if ever, updates the user interface. This enables legacy projects to be updated to the most new edition of React.js without having to change the codebase or make a few small changes.

React is adaptable. It can be conveniently paired with various state administrators (e.g., Redux, Flux, Alt or Reflux) and can be used to implement a number of architectural patterns.

Is there a market for React.js programmers?
The need for React.js developers is rising at an unparalleled rate. React.js is currently used by over one million websites around the world. React is used by Fortune 400+ businesses and popular companies such as Facebook, Twitter, Glassdoor and Cloudflare.

Final thoughts:

As you’ve seen, locating and Hire React js Developer and Hire React Native developer is a difficult challenge. You will have less challenges selecting the correct fit for your projects if you identify growing offshore locations (e.g. India) and take into consideration the details above.

If you want to make this process easier, You can visit our website for more, or else to write a email, we’ll help you to finding top rated React.js and React Native developers easier and with strives to create this operation

#hire-react-js-developer #hire-react-native-developer #react #react-native #react-js #hire-react-js-programmer