What is PACT community token (PACT) | What is PACT token

In this article, we’ll discuss information about the PACT community token project and PACT token

PACT token represents an entire ecosystem designed to unite the crypto community. PACT users can execute various management functions and have privileged access to products and services of the ecosystem, taking an active part in the development of PACT and receiving rewards in return.

is not just a token, but an entire ecosystem designed to unite the crypto community. Users of PACT token can execute various management functions and have privileged access to products and services of the ecosystem, taking an active part in the development of PACT and receiving rewards in return.

token

PACT Ecosystem

PACT Ecosystem

PactSwap

The decentralized exchange PactSwap, which is based on the AMM mechanism as a fork of Uniswap, was created by the PACT Team in order to meet the needs of the community to use decentralized exchange tools that do not imply the storage of funds by a third party and verification like KYC/AML.

PactSwap has a liquidity farming program. This means that if you carry out activity on the platform, you will receive a reward in PACT tokens. The main reward is the accrual of PACT tokens to all liquidity providers. The user provides liquidity in the PactSwap liquidity pools, and in return receives LP tokens (liquidity tokens). The user can place these tokens in the farming smart contract and will receive rewards in PACT tokens.

PACT Governance

All of the changes within the PACT ecosystem are made by voting by the PACT token holders. The voting mechanism implies the delegation of PACT tokens for the time of voting. Any controversial issues, as well as decisions that relate to the redirection of funds within the PACT ecosystem, are also made through votes.

PACT Incentives

A part of the income from any activity within the PACT ecosystem is referred to a separate pool under a specific Incentives smart contract.

PACT Base Pool

Users have an opportunity to get PACT tokens at a fixed price without slippage, and also to return these tokens back at the same price within 3 months. This opens up a host of arbitrage opportunities and allows mitigating the risks of increased volatility for PACT token holders.

Mining pool PACT NFT

Each NFT token (non-fungible token) contains the history of the token and the corresponding achievement level. We have implemented this in the form of various characters that have a set of specific skills. The user (the owner of the NFT token character) can develop these skills, thereby increasing the level of the character and the set of this character’s privileges.

PACT Token advantages

Initial active community

Trending NFT token

PactSwap DEX Platform

Arbitration opportunities

Governance Tools

Large-scale ecosystem

Tokenomics

Total Supply: 1 000 000 000 PACT
50%: Staking and Mining for NFT - 500 000 000
10%: Rewards (marketing, airdrops etc) - 100 000 000
10%: Team - 100 000 000
8%: Farming PactSwap - 80 000 000
5%: Base pool - 50 000 000
1%: Farming Pancake - 10 000 000
1%: Farming Uniswap - 10 000 000
15%: Reserves - 150 000 000

How and Where to Buy PACT token ?

PACT token is now live on the Ethereum and Binance mainnet. The token address for PACT is 0x66e7CE35578A37209d01F99F3d2fF271f981F581. Be cautious not to purchase any other token with a smart contract different from this one (as this can be easily faked). We strongly advise to be vigilant and stay safe throughout the launch. Don’t let the excitement get the best of you.

Just be sure you have enough ETH or BNB in your wallet to cover the transaction fees.

You will have to first buy one of the major cryptocurrencies, usually either Bitcoin (BTC), Ethereum (ETH), Tether (USDT), Binance (BNB)…

We will use Binance Exchange here as it is one of the largest crypto exchanges that accept fiat deposits.

Once you finished the KYC process. You will be asked to add a payment method. Here you can either choose to provide a credit/debit card or use a bank transfer, and buy one of the major cryptocurrencies, usually either Bitcoin (BTC), Ethereum (ETH), Tether (USDT), Binance (BNB)…

SIGN UP ON BINANCE

Step by Step Guide : What is Binance | How to Create an account on Binance (Updated 2021)

Next step

You need a wallet address to Connect to Uniswap or Pancakeswap Decentralized Exchange, we use Metamask wallet

If you don’t have a Metamask wallet, read this article and follow the steps

What is Metamask wallet | How to Create a wallet and Use

Transfer $ETH or $BNB to your new Metamask wallet from your existing wallet

Next step

Connect Metamask wallet to Uniswap or Pancakeswap Decentralized Exchange and Buy, Swap PACT token

Contract: 0x66e7CE35578A37209d01F99F3d2fF271f981F581

Read more:
What is Uniswap | Beginner’s Guide on How to Use Uniswap
What is Pancakeswap | Beginner’s Guide on How to Use Pancakeswap

The top exchange for trading in PACT token is currently P2PB2B, PancakeSwap (V2), and Uniswap (V2)

Find more information PACT

WebsiteExplorerExplorer 2WhitepaperSource CodeSocial ChannelCoinmarketcap

🔺DISCLAIMER: The Information in the post isn’t financial advice, is intended FOR GENERAL INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY. Trading Cryptocurrency is VERY risky. Make sure you understand these risks and that you are responsible for what you do with your money.

🔥 If you’re a beginner. I believe the article below will be useful to you ☞ What You Should Know Before Investing in Cryptocurrency - For Beginner

⭐ ⭐ ⭐The project is of interest to the community. Join to Get free ‘GEEK coin’ (GEEKCASH coin)!

☞ **-----CLICK HERE-----**⭐ ⭐ ⭐

I hope this post will help you. Don’t forget to leave a like, comment and sharing it with others. Thank you!

#blockchain #bitcoin #pact

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

What is PACT community token (PACT) | What is PACT token

Words Counted: A Ruby Natural Language Processor.

WordsCounted

We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

-- Oscar Wilde

WordsCounted is a Ruby NLP (natural language processor). WordsCounted lets you implement powerful tokensation strategies with a very flexible tokeniser class.

Are you using WordsCounted to do something interesting? Please tell me about it.

 

Demo

Visit this website for one example of what you can do with WordsCounted.

Features

  • Out of the box, get the following data from any string or readable file, or URL:
    • Token count and unique token count
    • Token densities, frequencies, and lengths
    • Char count and average chars per token
    • The longest tokens and their lengths
    • The most frequent tokens and their frequencies.
  • A flexible way to exclude tokens from the tokeniser. You can pass a string, regexp, symbol, lambda, or an array of any combination of those types for powerful tokenisation strategies.
  • Pass your own regexp rules to the tokeniser if you prefer. The default regexp filters special characters but keeps hyphens and apostrophes. It also plays nicely with diacritics (UTF and unicode characters): Bayrūt is treated as ["Bayrūt"] and not ["Bayr", "ū", "t"], for example.
  • Opens and reads files. Pass in a file path or a url instead of a string.

Installation

Add this line to your application's Gemfile:

gem 'words_counted'

And then execute:

$ bundle

Or install it yourself as:

$ gem install words_counted

Usage

Pass in a string or a file path, and an optional filter and/or regexp.

counter = WordsCounted.count(
  "We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars."
)

# Using a file
counter = WordsCounted.from_file("path/or/url/to/my/file.txt")

.count and .from_file are convenience methods that take an input, tokenise it, and return an instance of WordsCounted::Counter initialized with the tokens. The WordsCounted::Tokeniser and WordsCounted::Counter classes can be used alone, however.

API

WordsCounted

WordsCounted.count(input, options = {})

Tokenises input and initializes a WordsCounted::Counter object with the resulting tokens.

counter = WordsCounted.count("Hello Beirut!")

Accepts two options: exclude and regexp. See Excluding tokens from the analyser and Passing in a custom regexp respectively.

WordsCounted.from_file(path, options = {})

Reads and tokenises a file, and initializes a WordsCounted::Counter object with the resulting tokens.

counter = WordsCounted.from_file("hello_beirut.txt")

Accepts the same options as .count.

Tokeniser

The tokeniser allows you to tokenise text in a variety of ways. You can pass in your own rules for tokenisation, and apply a powerful filter with any combination of rules as long as they can boil down into a lambda.

Out of the box the tokeniser includes only alpha chars. Hyphenated tokens and tokens with apostrophes are considered a single token.

#tokenise([pattern: TOKEN_REGEXP, exclude: nil])

tokeniser = WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new("Hello Beirut!").tokenise

# With `exclude`
tokeniser = WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new("Hello Beirut!").tokenise(exclude: "hello")

# With `pattern`
tokeniser = WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new("I <3 Beirut!").tokenise(pattern: /[a-z]/i)

See Excluding tokens from the analyser and Passing in a custom regexp for more information.

Counter

The WordsCounted::Counter class allows you to collect various statistics from an array of tokens.

#token_count

Returns the token count of a given string.

counter.token_count #=> 15

#token_frequency

Returns a sorted (unstable) two-dimensional array where each element is a token and its frequency. The array is sorted by frequency in descending order.

counter.token_frequency

[
  ["the", 2],
  ["are", 2],
  ["we",  1],
  # ...
  ["all", 1]
]

#most_frequent_tokens

Returns a hash where each key-value pair is a token and its frequency.

counter.most_frequent_tokens

{ "are" => 2, "the" => 2 }

#token_lengths

Returns a sorted (unstable) two-dimentional array where each element contains a token and its length. The array is sorted by length in descending order.

counter.token_lengths

[
  ["looking", 7],
  ["gutter",  6],
  ["stars",   5],
  # ...
  ["in",      2]
]

#longest_tokens

Returns a hash where each key-value pair is a token and its length.

counter.longest_tokens

{ "looking" => 7 }

#token_density([ precision: 2 ])

Returns a sorted (unstable) two-dimentional array where each element contains a token and its density as a float, rounded to a precision of two. The array is sorted by density in descending order. It accepts a precision argument, which must be a float.

counter.token_density

[
  ["are",     0.13],
  ["the",     0.13],
  ["but",     0.07 ],
  # ...
  ["we",      0.07 ]
]

#char_count

Returns the char count of tokens.

counter.char_count #=> 76

#average_chars_per_token([ precision: 2 ])

Returns the average char count per token rounded to two decimal places. Accepts a precision argument which defaults to two. Precision must be a float.

counter.average_chars_per_token #=> 4

#uniq_token_count

Returns the number of unique tokens.

counter.uniq_token_count #=> 13

Excluding tokens from the tokeniser

You can exclude anything you want from the input by passing the exclude option. The exclude option accepts a variety of filters and is extremely flexible.

  1. A space-delimited string. The filter will normalise the string.
  2. A regular expression.
  3. A lambda.
  4. A symbol that names a predicate method. For example :odd?.
  5. An array of any combination of the above.
tokeniser =
  WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new(
    "Magnificent! That was magnificent, Trevor."
  )

# Using a string
tokeniser.tokenise(exclude: "was magnificent")
# => ["that", "trevor"]

# Using a regular expression
tokeniser.tokenise(exclude: /trevor/)
# => ["magnificent", "that", "was", "magnificent"]

# Using a lambda
tokeniser.tokenise(exclude: ->(t) { t.length < 4 })
# => ["magnificent", "that", "magnificent", "trevor"]

# Using symbol
tokeniser = WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new("Hello! محمد")
tokeniser.tokenise(exclude: :ascii_only?)
# => ["محمد"]

# Using an array
tokeniser = WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new(
  "Hello! اسماءنا هي محمد، كارولينا، سامي، وداني"
)
tokeniser.tokenise(
  exclude: [:ascii_only?, /محمد/, ->(t) { t.length > 6}, "و"]
)
# => ["هي", "سامي", "وداني"]

Passing in a custom regexp

The default regexp accounts for letters, hyphenated tokens, and apostrophes. This means twenty-one is treated as one token. So is Mohamad's.

/[\p{Alpha}\-']+/

You can pass your own criteria as a Ruby regular expression to split your string as desired.

For example, if you wanted to include numbers, you can override the regular expression:

counter = WordsCounted.count("Numbers 1, 2, and 3", pattern: /[\p{Alnum}\-']+/)
counter.tokens
#=> ["numbers", "1", "2", "and", "3"]

Opening and reading files

Use the from_file method to open files. from_file accepts the same options as .count. The file path can be a URL.

counter = WordsCounted.from_file("url/or/path/to/file.text")

Gotchas

A hyphen used in leu of an em or en dash will form part of the token. This affects the tokeniser algorithm.

counter = WordsCounted.count("How do you do?-you are well, I see.")
counter.token_frequency

[
  ["do",   2],
  ["how",  1],
  ["you",  1],
  ["-you", 1], # WTF, mate!
  ["are",  1],
  # ...
]

In this example -you and you are separate tokens. Also, the tokeniser does not include numbers by default. Remember that you can pass your own regular expression if the default behaviour does not fit your needs.

A note on case sensitivity

The program will normalise (downcase) all incoming strings for consistency and filters.

Roadmap

Ability to open URLs

def self.from_url
  # open url and send string here after removing html
end

Contributors

See contributors.

Contributing

  1. Fork it
  2. Create your feature branch (git checkout -b my-new-feature)
  3. Commit your changes (git commit -am 'Add some feature')
  4. Push to the branch (git push origin my-new-feature)
  5. Create new Pull Request

Author: abitdodgy
Source code: https://github.com/abitdodgy/words_counted
License: MIT license

#ruby  #ruby-on-rails 

Royce  Reinger

Royce Reinger

1658068560

WordsCounted: A Ruby Natural Language Processor

WordsCounted

We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

-- Oscar Wilde

WordsCounted is a Ruby NLP (natural language processor). WordsCounted lets you implement powerful tokensation strategies with a very flexible tokeniser class.

Features

  • Out of the box, get the following data from any string or readable file, or URL:
    • Token count and unique token count
    • Token densities, frequencies, and lengths
    • Char count and average chars per token
    • The longest tokens and their lengths
    • The most frequent tokens and their frequencies.
  • A flexible way to exclude tokens from the tokeniser. You can pass a string, regexp, symbol, lambda, or an array of any combination of those types for powerful tokenisation strategies.
  • Pass your own regexp rules to the tokeniser if you prefer. The default regexp filters special characters but keeps hyphens and apostrophes. It also plays nicely with diacritics (UTF and unicode characters): Bayrūt is treated as ["Bayrūt"] and not ["Bayr", "ū", "t"], for example.
  • Opens and reads files. Pass in a file path or a url instead of a string.

Installation

Add this line to your application's Gemfile:

gem 'words_counted'

And then execute:

$ bundle

Or install it yourself as:

$ gem install words_counted

Usage

Pass in a string or a file path, and an optional filter and/or regexp.

counter = WordsCounted.count(
  "We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars."
)

# Using a file
counter = WordsCounted.from_file("path/or/url/to/my/file.txt")

.count and .from_file are convenience methods that take an input, tokenise it, and return an instance of WordsCounted::Counter initialized with the tokens. The WordsCounted::Tokeniser and WordsCounted::Counter classes can be used alone, however.

API

WordsCounted

WordsCounted.count(input, options = {})

Tokenises input and initializes a WordsCounted::Counter object with the resulting tokens.

counter = WordsCounted.count("Hello Beirut!")

Accepts two options: exclude and regexp. See Excluding tokens from the analyser and Passing in a custom regexp respectively.

WordsCounted.from_file(path, options = {})

Reads and tokenises a file, and initializes a WordsCounted::Counter object with the resulting tokens.

counter = WordsCounted.from_file("hello_beirut.txt")

Accepts the same options as .count.

Tokeniser

The tokeniser allows you to tokenise text in a variety of ways. You can pass in your own rules for tokenisation, and apply a powerful filter with any combination of rules as long as they can boil down into a lambda.

Out of the box the tokeniser includes only alpha chars. Hyphenated tokens and tokens with apostrophes are considered a single token.

#tokenise([pattern: TOKEN_REGEXP, exclude: nil])

tokeniser = WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new("Hello Beirut!").tokenise

# With `exclude`
tokeniser = WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new("Hello Beirut!").tokenise(exclude: "hello")

# With `pattern`
tokeniser = WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new("I <3 Beirut!").tokenise(pattern: /[a-z]/i)

See Excluding tokens from the analyser and Passing in a custom regexp for more information.

Counter

The WordsCounted::Counter class allows you to collect various statistics from an array of tokens.

#token_count

Returns the token count of a given string.

counter.token_count #=> 15

#token_frequency

Returns a sorted (unstable) two-dimensional array where each element is a token and its frequency. The array is sorted by frequency in descending order.

counter.token_frequency

[
  ["the", 2],
  ["are", 2],
  ["we",  1],
  # ...
  ["all", 1]
]

#most_frequent_tokens

Returns a hash where each key-value pair is a token and its frequency.

counter.most_frequent_tokens

{ "are" => 2, "the" => 2 }

#token_lengths

Returns a sorted (unstable) two-dimentional array where each element contains a token and its length. The array is sorted by length in descending order.

counter.token_lengths

[
  ["looking", 7],
  ["gutter",  6],
  ["stars",   5],
  # ...
  ["in",      2]
]

#longest_tokens

Returns a hash where each key-value pair is a token and its length.

counter.longest_tokens

{ "looking" => 7 }

#token_density([ precision: 2 ])

Returns a sorted (unstable) two-dimentional array where each element contains a token and its density as a float, rounded to a precision of two. The array is sorted by density in descending order. It accepts a precision argument, which must be a float.

counter.token_density

[
  ["are",     0.13],
  ["the",     0.13],
  ["but",     0.07 ],
  # ...
  ["we",      0.07 ]
]

#char_count

Returns the char count of tokens.

counter.char_count #=> 76

#average_chars_per_token([ precision: 2 ])

Returns the average char count per token rounded to two decimal places. Accepts a precision argument which defaults to two. Precision must be a float.

counter.average_chars_per_token #=> 4

#uniq_token_count

Returns the number of unique tokens.

counter.uniq_token_count #=> 13

Excluding tokens from the tokeniser

You can exclude anything you want from the input by passing the exclude option. The exclude option accepts a variety of filters and is extremely flexible.

  1. A space-delimited string. The filter will normalise the string.
  2. A regular expression.
  3. A lambda.
  4. A symbol that names a predicate method. For example :odd?.
  5. An array of any combination of the above.
tokeniser =
  WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new(
    "Magnificent! That was magnificent, Trevor."
  )

# Using a string
tokeniser.tokenise(exclude: "was magnificent")
# => ["that", "trevor"]

# Using a regular expression
tokeniser.tokenise(exclude: /trevor/)
# => ["magnificent", "that", "was", "magnificent"]

# Using a lambda
tokeniser.tokenise(exclude: ->(t) { t.length < 4 })
# => ["magnificent", "that", "magnificent", "trevor"]

# Using symbol
tokeniser = WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new("Hello! محمد")
tokeniser.tokenise(exclude: :ascii_only?)
# => ["محمد"]

# Using an array
tokeniser = WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new(
  "Hello! اسماءنا هي محمد، كارولينا، سامي، وداني"
)
tokeniser.tokenise(
  exclude: [:ascii_only?, /محمد/, ->(t) { t.length > 6}, "و"]
)
# => ["هي", "سامي", "وداني"]

Passing in a custom regexp

The default regexp accounts for letters, hyphenated tokens, and apostrophes. This means twenty-one is treated as one token. So is Mohamad's.

/[\p{Alpha}\-']+/

You can pass your own criteria as a Ruby regular expression to split your string as desired.

For example, if you wanted to include numbers, you can override the regular expression:

counter = WordsCounted.count("Numbers 1, 2, and 3", pattern: /[\p{Alnum}\-']+/)
counter.tokens
#=> ["numbers", "1", "2", "and", "3"]

Opening and reading files

Use the from_file method to open files. from_file accepts the same options as .count. The file path can be a URL.

counter = WordsCounted.from_file("url/or/path/to/file.text")

Gotchas

A hyphen used in leu of an em or en dash will form part of the token. This affects the tokeniser algorithm.

counter = WordsCounted.count("How do you do?-you are well, I see.")
counter.token_frequency

[
  ["do",   2],
  ["how",  1],
  ["you",  1],
  ["-you", 1], # WTF, mate!
  ["are",  1],
  # ...
]

In this example -you and you are separate tokens. Also, the tokeniser does not include numbers by default. Remember that you can pass your own regular expression if the default behaviour does not fit your needs.

A note on case sensitivity

The program will normalise (downcase) all incoming strings for consistency and filters.

Roadmap

Ability to open URLs

def self.from_url
  # open url and send string here after removing html
end

Are you using WordsCounted to do something interesting? Please tell me about it.

Gem Version 

RubyDoc documentation.

Demo

Visit this website for one example of what you can do with WordsCounted.


Contributors

See contributors.

Contributing

  1. Fork it
  2. Create your feature branch (git checkout -b my-new-feature)
  3. Commit your changes (git commit -am 'Add some feature')
  4. Push to the branch (git push origin my-new-feature)
  5. Create new Pull Request

Author: Abitdodgy
Source Code: https://github.com/abitdodgy/words_counted 
License: MIT license

#ruby #nlp 

aaron silva

aaron silva

1622197808

SafeMoon Clone | Create A DeFi Token Like SafeMoon | DeFi token like SafeMoon

SafeMoon is a decentralized finance (DeFi) token. This token consists of RFI tokenomics and auto-liquidity generating protocol. A DeFi token like SafeMoon has reached the mainstream standards under the Binance Smart Chain. Its success and popularity have been immense, thus, making the majority of the business firms adopt this style of cryptocurrency as an alternative.

A DeFi token like SafeMoon is almost similar to the other crypto-token, but the only difference being that it charges a 10% transaction fee from the users who sell their tokens, in which 5% of the fee is distributed to the remaining SafeMoon owners. This feature rewards the owners for holding onto their tokens.

Read More @ https://bit.ly/3oFbJoJ

#create a defi token like safemoon #defi token like safemoon #safemoon token #safemoon token clone #defi token

What is PACT community token (PACT) | What is PACT token

In this article, we’ll discuss information about the PACT community token project and PACT token

PACT token represents an entire ecosystem designed to unite the crypto community. PACT users can execute various management functions and have privileged access to products and services of the ecosystem, taking an active part in the development of PACT and receiving rewards in return.

is not just a token, but an entire ecosystem designed to unite the crypto community. Users of PACT token can execute various management functions and have privileged access to products and services of the ecosystem, taking an active part in the development of PACT and receiving rewards in return.

token

PACT Ecosystem

PACT Ecosystem

PactSwap

The decentralized exchange PactSwap, which is based on the AMM mechanism as a fork of Uniswap, was created by the PACT Team in order to meet the needs of the community to use decentralized exchange tools that do not imply the storage of funds by a third party and verification like KYC/AML.

PactSwap has a liquidity farming program. This means that if you carry out activity on the platform, you will receive a reward in PACT tokens. The main reward is the accrual of PACT tokens to all liquidity providers. The user provides liquidity in the PactSwap liquidity pools, and in return receives LP tokens (liquidity tokens). The user can place these tokens in the farming smart contract and will receive rewards in PACT tokens.

PACT Governance

All of the changes within the PACT ecosystem are made by voting by the PACT token holders. The voting mechanism implies the delegation of PACT tokens for the time of voting. Any controversial issues, as well as decisions that relate to the redirection of funds within the PACT ecosystem, are also made through votes.

PACT Incentives

A part of the income from any activity within the PACT ecosystem is referred to a separate pool under a specific Incentives smart contract.

PACT Base Pool

Users have an opportunity to get PACT tokens at a fixed price without slippage, and also to return these tokens back at the same price within 3 months. This opens up a host of arbitrage opportunities and allows mitigating the risks of increased volatility for PACT token holders.

Mining pool PACT NFT

Each NFT token (non-fungible token) contains the history of the token and the corresponding achievement level. We have implemented this in the form of various characters that have a set of specific skills. The user (the owner of the NFT token character) can develop these skills, thereby increasing the level of the character and the set of this character’s privileges.

PACT Token advantages

Initial active community

Trending NFT token

PactSwap DEX Platform

Arbitration opportunities

Governance Tools

Large-scale ecosystem

Tokenomics

Total Supply: 1 000 000 000 PACT
50%: Staking and Mining for NFT - 500 000 000
10%: Rewards (marketing, airdrops etc) - 100 000 000
10%: Team - 100 000 000
8%: Farming PactSwap - 80 000 000
5%: Base pool - 50 000 000
1%: Farming Pancake - 10 000 000
1%: Farming Uniswap - 10 000 000
15%: Reserves - 150 000 000

How and Where to Buy PACT token ?

PACT token is now live on the Ethereum and Binance mainnet. The token address for PACT is 0x66e7CE35578A37209d01F99F3d2fF271f981F581. Be cautious not to purchase any other token with a smart contract different from this one (as this can be easily faked). We strongly advise to be vigilant and stay safe throughout the launch. Don’t let the excitement get the best of you.

Just be sure you have enough ETH or BNB in your wallet to cover the transaction fees.

You will have to first buy one of the major cryptocurrencies, usually either Bitcoin (BTC), Ethereum (ETH), Tether (USDT), Binance (BNB)…

We will use Binance Exchange here as it is one of the largest crypto exchanges that accept fiat deposits.

Once you finished the KYC process. You will be asked to add a payment method. Here you can either choose to provide a credit/debit card or use a bank transfer, and buy one of the major cryptocurrencies, usually either Bitcoin (BTC), Ethereum (ETH), Tether (USDT), Binance (BNB)…

SIGN UP ON BINANCE

Step by Step Guide : What is Binance | How to Create an account on Binance (Updated 2021)

Next step

You need a wallet address to Connect to Uniswap or Pancakeswap Decentralized Exchange, we use Metamask wallet

If you don’t have a Metamask wallet, read this article and follow the steps

What is Metamask wallet | How to Create a wallet and Use

Transfer $ETH or $BNB to your new Metamask wallet from your existing wallet

Next step

Connect Metamask wallet to Uniswap or Pancakeswap Decentralized Exchange and Buy, Swap PACT token

Contract: 0x66e7CE35578A37209d01F99F3d2fF271f981F581

Read more:
What is Uniswap | Beginner’s Guide on How to Use Uniswap
What is Pancakeswap | Beginner’s Guide on How to Use Pancakeswap

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Paris  Turcotte

Paris Turcotte

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Connecting with the Docker Community– Recap of Our First Community All Hands

Last week, we held our first Community All Hands and the response was phenomenal. A huge thank you to all 1,100+ people who joined. If you missed it, you can watch the recording here. You can also find answers to those questions that came in towards the end that we didn’t have time to answer here.

This all-hands was an effort to further deepen our engagement with the community and bring users, contributors and staff together on a quarterly basis to share updates on what we’re working on and what our priorities are for 2021 and beyond. The event was also an opportunity to give the community direct access to Docker’s leadership and provide a platform to submit questions and upvote those that are most relevant and important to people.

The overwhelming piece of feedback we got from attendees was that the event was too short and people would have loved to see more demos. We certainly had a packed agenda and we did our best to squeeze in as much into an hour. For our next one (in February 2021!), we’ll aim to extend the event by 30 minutes and include more live demos. We’ll also try to make it more interactive and give additional time to answer more questions. If you have any other ideas on how we can improve the all-hands and make it more engaging, don’t hesitate to send me a note on our community slack (@William).

Community events are a key pillar of our community-building strategy and we look forward to experimenting with new types of events like this one to continue pushing for more participation, openness and engagement. Onwards!

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