Node.js course with building a fintech banking app – Lesson 3: User registration PART 2

This article was originally published at https://www.blog.duomly.com/node-js-course-with-building-a-fintech-banking-app-lesson-3-user-registration-response


In the previous week, I’ve published the second lesson of the Node.js Course, where we created registration and saved new users in our database.

If you would like to be updated, feel free to go back to the lesson one and follow up or get the first lesson code from our Github.

Today I’m going to refactor the code we’ve created for user registration to create a response which our API will send as a result.
We are going to create objects where we will select the data we would like to send as the response in case of successful registration and in case of the error.

And of course, as always, we’ve got a video version for you!

Before, we will start open the code from the previous lesson to be able to write it with me.

Let’s start!

1. Refactoring UserService

We will start by refactoring our user.service.ts file, so please open it, and let's start by refactoring the code in our if statement.
if (newUser) {
  const account = await this.accountsService.create(newUser.id);
  const accounts = [account];
  const response = {
    user: {
      id: newUser.id,
      username: newUser.Username.trim(),
      email: newUser.Email.trim(),
      accounts,
    },
    token: jwtToken,
    success: true,
  }
  return response;
}
return { 
  success: false,
  message: 'Creating new user went wrong.',
}
Now, let me explain what we are doing it and why. When the user is saved to the database, API needs to send us the response, if the call was successful or not. Also, we need to get some data as a result of the successful request.

According to the safety reasons, we shouldn’t send the whole user from the database, because values like password or salt shouldn’t be accessible for others. That’s why we define the new response object, where we are passing values like user id, username, user email, accounts, and token for authentication.

If the user will be created in our database, then the object is returned. Otherwise, our API will return the error message with information that something went wrong.

In the same file, we will also change the error handling when our user email already exists.

if (exists) {
      return {
        success: false,
        message: 'This email already exists.'
      }
} else {
  ...
}

So, right now if the user will try to create the account using the same email twice, we will see the response with the message like that.

Okay, we’ve done with refactoring in the user.service.ts file and now we should jump to the accounts.service.ts file to do similar refactoring and create an object with the values we want to return.

2. Refactoring AccountsService

As I mentioned above now we will be refactoring the accounts.service.ts file and we will be creating the object, that will be returned with the user. So, let's open the file and let's start at the bottom of our code.
if (newAccount) {
    return {
      ...account,
      id: newAccount.id,
    }
 }
And here that's all that we need to change. The next step is UserController.

3. Refactoring UserController

The next step in our refactoring is changing the user.controller.ts file, so we will get the proper response with the proper status. We need to import Res from '@nestjs/common' and implement it into our return statement.
import { UsersService } from './users.service';
import { Controller, Post, Body, HttpException, HttpStatus, Res } from '@nestjs/common';
import { IUser } from './interfaces/user.interface';

@Controller(‘users’)
export class UsersController {
constructor(private usersService: UsersService) { }

@Post(‘register’)
public async register(@Res() res, @Body() user: IUser): Promise<any> {
const result: any = await this.usersService.create(user);
if (!result.success) {
throw new HttpException(result.message, HttpStatus.BAD_REQUEST);
}
return res.status(HttpStatus.OK).json(result);
}
}


Great, we are ready to test our backend right now. So let’s start our backend and we will test it with Postman.

4. Testing the API

When your backend is running, please open the Postman or any similar software and we are going to make a POST call. In my case backend is working on http://localhost:3000 and the full endpoint is http://localhost:3000/users/register . We are going to post our params as a JSON object. Here's what I'm posting:
{
  "Username": "John",
  "Email": "john@test.com",
  "Password": "johntest"
}
And voila! We should see the following response right now!

Postman Response

If you’ve got the response similar to the one above it seems like everything works. Also, feel free to try posting the existing email and see if you’ve got the expected message.

5. Comment the AccountsController

In the previous lesson, we've created an AccountsController where we set up the endpoint for creating a new account. But we didn't do any guard which would prevent unauthorized users by creating an account for another user. That's why we need to comment this code for now, until we will create the guard for this endpoint.

So, let’s open accounts.controller.ts file and let’s comment out the code like below.

import { AccountsService } from './accounts.service';
import { Controller, Post, Body, HttpException, HttpStatus } from '@nestjs/common';

@Controller('accounts')
export class AccountsController {
  constructor(private accountsService: AccountsService) { }

  // @Post('create-account')  
  //   public async register(@Body() UserId: number): Promise<any> {    
  //   const result: any = await this.accountsService.create(UserId);
  //   if (!result.success) {
  //     throw new HttpException(result.message, HttpStatus.BAD_REQUEST);    
  //   }
  //   return result;  
  // }
}

So, now our application is working and prepared for the next steps.

Conclusion

In the second part of our User Registration lesson of the Node.js Course we've created the right response from our API, so now the registration is fully functional.

I’ve also taken care of handling errors and sending the right message, and also we’ve commented on the code that is not safe right now.

In the next lessons, we will go through login, user authentication, and guards.

If you didn’t manage to get the code properly, take a look at our Github where you can find the code for the Node.js Course.

Node.js - Lesson 3 - Code 

Thank you for reading,

Anna from Duomly

#node #web-development #nestjs #rest #typescript

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Node.js course with building a fintech banking app – Lesson 3: User registration PART 2

A Wrapper for Sembast and SQFlite to Enable Easy

FHIR_DB

This is really just a wrapper around Sembast_SQFLite - so all of the heavy lifting was done by Alex Tekartik. I highly recommend that if you have any questions about working with this package that you take a look at Sembast. He's also just a super nice guy, and even answered a question for me when I was deciding which sembast version to use. As usual, ResoCoder also has a good tutorial.

I have an interest in low-resource settings and thus a specific reason to be able to store data offline. To encourage this use, there are a number of other packages I have created based around the data format FHIR. FHIR® is the registered trademark of HL7 and is used with the permission of HL7. Use of the FHIR trademark does not constitute endorsement of this product by HL7.

Using the Db

So, while not absolutely necessary, I highly recommend that you use some sort of interface class. This adds the benefit of more easily handling errors, plus if you change to a different database in the future, you don't have to change the rest of your app, just the interface.

I've used something like this in my projects:

class IFhirDb {
  IFhirDb();
  final ResourceDao resourceDao = ResourceDao();

  Future<Either<DbFailure, Resource>> save(Resource resource) async {
    Resource resultResource;
    try {
      resultResource = await resourceDao.save(resource);
    } catch (error) {
      return left(DbFailure.unableToSave(error: error.toString()));
    }
    return right(resultResource);
  }

  Future<Either<DbFailure, List<Resource>>> returnListOfSingleResourceType(
      String resourceType) async {
    List<Resource> resultList;
    try {
      resultList =
          await resourceDao.getAllSortedById(resourceType: resourceType);
    } catch (error) {
      return left(DbFailure.unableToObtainList(error: error.toString()));
    }
    return right(resultList);
  }

  Future<Either<DbFailure, List<Resource>>> searchFunction(
      String resourceType, String searchString, String reference) async {
    List<Resource> resultList;
    try {
      resultList =
          await resourceDao.searchFor(resourceType, searchString, reference);
    } catch (error) {
      return left(DbFailure.unableToObtainList(error: error.toString()));
    }
    return right(resultList);
  }
}

I like this because in case there's an i/o error or something, it won't crash your app. Then, you can call this interface in your app like the following:

final patient = Patient(
    resourceType: 'Patient',
    name: [HumanName(text: 'New Patient Name')],
    birthDate: Date(DateTime.now()),
);

final saveResult = await IFhirDb().save(patient);

This will save your newly created patient to the locally embedded database.

IMPORTANT: this database will expect that all previously created resources have an id. When you save a resource, it will check to see if that resource type has already been stored. (Each resource type is saved in it's own store in the database). It will then check if there is an ID. If there's no ID, it will create a new one for that resource (along with metadata on version number and creation time). It will save it, and return the resource. If it already has an ID, it will copy the the old version of the resource into a _history store. It will then update the metadata of the new resource and save that version into the appropriate store for that resource. If, for instance, we have a previously created patient:

{
    "resourceType": "Patient",
    "id": "fhirfli-294057507-6811107",
    "meta": {
        "versionId": "1",
        "lastUpdated": "2020-10-16T19:41:28.054369Z"
    },
    "name": [
        {
            "given": ["New"],
            "family": "Patient"
        }
    ],
    "birthDate": "2020-10-16"
}

And we update the last name to 'Provider'. The above version of the patient will be kept in _history, while in the 'Patient' store in the db, we will have the updated version:

{
    "resourceType": "Patient",
    "id": "fhirfli-294057507-6811107",
    "meta": {
        "versionId": "2",
        "lastUpdated": "2020-10-16T19:45:07.316698Z"
    },
    "name": [
        {
            "given": ["New"],
            "family": "Provider"
        }
    ],
    "birthDate": "2020-10-16"
}

This way we can keep track of all previous version of all resources (which is obviously important in medicine).

For most of the interactions (saving, deleting, etc), they work the way you'd expect. The only difference is search. Because Sembast is NoSQL, we can search on any of the fields in a resource. If in our interface class, we have the following function:

  Future<Either<DbFailure, List<Resource>>> searchFunction(
      String resourceType, String searchString, String reference) async {
    List<Resource> resultList;
    try {
      resultList =
          await resourceDao.searchFor(resourceType, searchString, reference);
    } catch (error) {
      return left(DbFailure.unableToObtainList(error: error.toString()));
    }
    return right(resultList);
  }

You can search for all immunizations of a certain patient:

searchFunction(
        'Immunization', 'patient.reference', 'Patient/$patientId');

This function will search through all entries in the 'Immunization' store. It will look at all 'patient.reference' fields, and return any that match 'Patient/$patientId'.

The last thing I'll mention is that this is a password protected db, using AES-256 encryption (although it can also use Salsa20). Anytime you use the db, you have the option of using a password for encryption/decryption. Remember, if you setup the database using encryption, you will only be able to access it using that same password. When you're ready to change the password, you will need to call the update password function. If we again assume we created a change password method in our interface, it might look something like this:

class IFhirDb {
  IFhirDb();
  final ResourceDao resourceDao = ResourceDao();
  ...
    Future<Either<DbFailure, Unit>> updatePassword(String oldPassword, String newPassword) async {
    try {
      await resourceDao.updatePw(oldPassword, newPassword);
    } catch (error) {
      return left(DbFailure.unableToUpdatePassword(error: error.toString()));
    }
    return right(Unit);
  }

You don't have to use a password, and in that case, it will save the db file as plain text. If you want to add a password later, it will encrypt it at that time.

General Store

After using this for a while in an app, I've realized that it needs to be able to store data apart from just FHIR resources, at least on occasion. For this, I've added a second class for all versions of the database called GeneralDao. This is similar to the ResourceDao, but fewer options. So, in order to save something, it would look like this:

await GeneralDao().save('password', {'new':'map'});
await GeneralDao().save('password', {'new':'map'}, 'key');

The difference between these two options is that the first one will generate a key for the map being stored, while the second will store the map using the key provided. Both will return the key after successfully storing the map.

Other functions available include:

// deletes everything in the general store
await GeneralDao().deleteAllGeneral('password'); 

// delete specific entry
await GeneralDao().delete('password','key'); 

// returns map with that key
await GeneralDao().find('password', 'key'); 

FHIR® is a registered trademark of Health Level Seven International (HL7) and its use does not constitute an endorsement of products by HL7®

Use this package as a library

Depend on it

Run this command:

With Flutter:

 $ flutter pub add fhir_db

This will add a line like this to your package's pubspec.yaml (and run an implicit flutter pub get):

dependencies:
  fhir_db: ^0.4.3

Alternatively, your editor might support or flutter pub get. Check the docs for your editor to learn more.

Import it

Now in your Dart code, you can use:

import 'package:fhir_db/dstu2.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/dstu2/fhir_db.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/dstu2/general_dao.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/dstu2/resource_dao.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/encrypt/aes.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/encrypt/salsa.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r4.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r4/fhir_db.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r4/general_dao.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r4/resource_dao.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r5.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r5/fhir_db.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r5/general_dao.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r5/resource_dao.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/stu3.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/stu3/fhir_db.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/stu3/general_dao.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/stu3/resource_dao.dart'; 

example/lib/main.dart

import 'package:fhir/r4.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r4.dart';
import 'package:flutter/material.dart';
import 'package:test/test.dart';

Future<void> main() async {
  WidgetsFlutterBinding.ensureInitialized();

  final resourceDao = ResourceDao();

  // await resourceDao.updatePw('newPw', null);
  await resourceDao.deleteAllResources(null);

  group('Playing with passwords', () {
    test('Playing with Passwords', () async {
      final patient = Patient(id: Id('1'));

      final saved = await resourceDao.save(null, patient);

      await resourceDao.updatePw(null, 'newPw');
      final search1 = await resourceDao.find('newPw',
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Patient, id: Id('1'));
      expect(saved, search1[0]);

      await resourceDao.updatePw('newPw', 'newerPw');
      final search2 = await resourceDao.find('newerPw',
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Patient, id: Id('1'));
      expect(saved, search2[0]);

      await resourceDao.updatePw('newerPw', null);
      final search3 = await resourceDao.find(null,
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Patient, id: Id('1'));
      expect(saved, search3[0]);

      await resourceDao.deleteAllResources(null);
    });
  });

  final id = Id('12345');
  group('Saving Things:', () {
    test('Save Patient', () async {
      final humanName = HumanName(family: 'Atreides', given: ['Duke']);
      final patient = Patient(id: id, name: [humanName]);
      final saved = await resourceDao.save(null, patient);

      expect(saved.id, id);

      expect((saved as Patient).name?[0], humanName);
    });

    test('Save Organization', () async {
      final organization = Organization(id: id, name: 'FhirFli');
      final saved = await resourceDao.save(null, organization);

      expect(saved.id, id);

      expect((saved as Organization).name, 'FhirFli');
    });

    test('Save Observation1', () async {
      final observation1 = Observation(
        id: Id('obs1'),
        code: CodeableConcept(text: 'Observation #1'),
        effectiveDateTime: FhirDateTime(DateTime(1981, 09, 18)),
      );
      final saved = await resourceDao.save(null, observation1);

      expect(saved.id, Id('obs1'));

      expect((saved as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #1');
    });

    test('Save Observation1 Again', () async {
      final observation1 = Observation(
          id: Id('obs1'),
          code: CodeableConcept(text: 'Observation #1 - Updated'));
      final saved = await resourceDao.save(null, observation1);

      expect(saved.id, Id('obs1'));

      expect((saved as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #1 - Updated');

      expect(saved.meta?.versionId, Id('2'));
    });

    test('Save Observation2', () async {
      final observation2 = Observation(
        id: Id('obs2'),
        code: CodeableConcept(text: 'Observation #2'),
        effectiveDateTime: FhirDateTime(DateTime(1981, 09, 18)),
      );
      final saved = await resourceDao.save(null, observation2);

      expect(saved.id, Id('obs2'));

      expect((saved as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #2');
    });

    test('Save Observation3', () async {
      final observation3 = Observation(
        id: Id('obs3'),
        code: CodeableConcept(text: 'Observation #3'),
        effectiveDateTime: FhirDateTime(DateTime(1981, 09, 18)),
      );
      final saved = await resourceDao.save(null, observation3);

      expect(saved.id, Id('obs3'));

      expect((saved as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #3');
    });
  });

  group('Finding Things:', () {
    test('Find 1st Patient', () async {
      final search = await resourceDao.find(null,
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Patient, id: id);
      final humanName = HumanName(family: 'Atreides', given: ['Duke']);

      expect(search.length, 1);

      expect((search[0] as Patient).name?[0], humanName);
    });

    test('Find 3rd Observation', () async {
      final search = await resourceDao.find(null,
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Observation, id: Id('obs3'));

      expect(search.length, 1);

      expect(search[0].id, Id('obs3'));

      expect((search[0] as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #3');
    });

    test('Find All Observations', () async {
      final search = await resourceDao.getResourceType(
        null,
        resourceTypes: [R4ResourceType.Observation],
      );

      expect(search.length, 3);

      final idList = [];
      for (final obs in search) {
        idList.add(obs.id.toString());
      }

      expect(idList.contains('obs1'), true);

      expect(idList.contains('obs2'), true);

      expect(idList.contains('obs3'), true);
    });

    test('Find All (non-historical) Resources', () async {
      final search = await resourceDao.getAll(null);

      expect(search.length, 5);
      final patList = search.toList();
      final orgList = search.toList();
      final obsList = search.toList();
      patList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Patient);
      orgList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Organization);
      obsList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Observation);

      expect(patList.length, 1);

      expect(orgList.length, 1);

      expect(obsList.length, 3);
    });
  });

  group('Deleting Things:', () {
    test('Delete 2nd Observation', () async {
      await resourceDao.delete(
          null, null, R4ResourceType.Observation, Id('obs2'), null, null);

      final search = await resourceDao.getResourceType(
        null,
        resourceTypes: [R4ResourceType.Observation],
      );

      expect(search.length, 2);

      final idList = [];
      for (final obs in search) {
        idList.add(obs.id.toString());
      }

      expect(idList.contains('obs1'), true);

      expect(idList.contains('obs2'), false);

      expect(idList.contains('obs3'), true);
    });

    test('Delete All Observations', () async {
      await resourceDao.deleteSingleType(null,
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Observation);

      final search = await resourceDao.getAll(null);

      expect(search.length, 2);

      final patList = search.toList();
      final orgList = search.toList();
      patList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Patient);
      orgList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Organization);

      expect(patList.length, 1);

      expect(patList.length, 1);
    });

    test('Delete All Resources', () async {
      await resourceDao.deleteAllResources(null);

      final search = await resourceDao.getAll(null);

      expect(search.length, 0);
    });
  });

  group('Password - Saving Things:', () {
    test('Save Patient', () async {
      await resourceDao.updatePw(null, 'newPw');
      final humanName = HumanName(family: 'Atreides', given: ['Duke']);
      final patient = Patient(id: id, name: [humanName]);
      final saved = await resourceDao.save('newPw', patient);

      expect(saved.id, id);

      expect((saved as Patient).name?[0], humanName);
    });

    test('Save Organization', () async {
      final organization = Organization(id: id, name: 'FhirFli');
      final saved = await resourceDao.save('newPw', organization);

      expect(saved.id, id);

      expect((saved as Organization).name, 'FhirFli');
    });

    test('Save Observation1', () async {
      final observation1 = Observation(
        id: Id('obs1'),
        code: CodeableConcept(text: 'Observation #1'),
        effectiveDateTime: FhirDateTime(DateTime(1981, 09, 18)),
      );
      final saved = await resourceDao.save('newPw', observation1);

      expect(saved.id, Id('obs1'));

      expect((saved as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #1');
    });

    test('Save Observation1 Again', () async {
      final observation1 = Observation(
          id: Id('obs1'),
          code: CodeableConcept(text: 'Observation #1 - Updated'));
      final saved = await resourceDao.save('newPw', observation1);

      expect(saved.id, Id('obs1'));

      expect((saved as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #1 - Updated');

      expect(saved.meta?.versionId, Id('2'));
    });

    test('Save Observation2', () async {
      final observation2 = Observation(
        id: Id('obs2'),
        code: CodeableConcept(text: 'Observation #2'),
        effectiveDateTime: FhirDateTime(DateTime(1981, 09, 18)),
      );
      final saved = await resourceDao.save('newPw', observation2);

      expect(saved.id, Id('obs2'));

      expect((saved as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #2');
    });

    test('Save Observation3', () async {
      final observation3 = Observation(
        id: Id('obs3'),
        code: CodeableConcept(text: 'Observation #3'),
        effectiveDateTime: FhirDateTime(DateTime(1981, 09, 18)),
      );
      final saved = await resourceDao.save('newPw', observation3);

      expect(saved.id, Id('obs3'));

      expect((saved as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #3');
    });
  });

  group('Password - Finding Things:', () {
    test('Find 1st Patient', () async {
      final search = await resourceDao.find('newPw',
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Patient, id: id);
      final humanName = HumanName(family: 'Atreides', given: ['Duke']);

      expect(search.length, 1);

      expect((search[0] as Patient).name?[0], humanName);
    });

    test('Find 3rd Observation', () async {
      final search = await resourceDao.find('newPw',
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Observation, id: Id('obs3'));

      expect(search.length, 1);

      expect(search[0].id, Id('obs3'));

      expect((search[0] as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #3');
    });

    test('Find All Observations', () async {
      final search = await resourceDao.getResourceType(
        'newPw',
        resourceTypes: [R4ResourceType.Observation],
      );

      expect(search.length, 3);

      final idList = [];
      for (final obs in search) {
        idList.add(obs.id.toString());
      }

      expect(idList.contains('obs1'), true);

      expect(idList.contains('obs2'), true);

      expect(idList.contains('obs3'), true);
    });

    test('Find All (non-historical) Resources', () async {
      final search = await resourceDao.getAll('newPw');

      expect(search.length, 5);
      final patList = search.toList();
      final orgList = search.toList();
      final obsList = search.toList();
      patList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Patient);
      orgList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Organization);
      obsList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Observation);

      expect(patList.length, 1);

      expect(orgList.length, 1);

      expect(obsList.length, 3);
    });
  });

  group('Password - Deleting Things:', () {
    test('Delete 2nd Observation', () async {
      await resourceDao.delete(
          'newPw', null, R4ResourceType.Observation, Id('obs2'), null, null);

      final search = await resourceDao.getResourceType(
        'newPw',
        resourceTypes: [R4ResourceType.Observation],
      );

      expect(search.length, 2);

      final idList = [];
      for (final obs in search) {
        idList.add(obs.id.toString());
      }

      expect(idList.contains('obs1'), true);

      expect(idList.contains('obs2'), false);

      expect(idList.contains('obs3'), true);
    });

    test('Delete All Observations', () async {
      await resourceDao.deleteSingleType('newPw',
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Observation);

      final search = await resourceDao.getAll('newPw');

      expect(search.length, 2);

      final patList = search.toList();
      final orgList = search.toList();
      patList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Patient);
      orgList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Organization);

      expect(patList.length, 1);

      expect(patList.length, 1);
    });

    test('Delete All Resources', () async {
      await resourceDao.deleteAllResources('newPw');

      final search = await resourceDao.getAll('newPw');

      expect(search.length, 0);

      await resourceDao.updatePw('newPw', null);
    });
  });
} 

Download Details:

Author: MayJuun

Source Code: https://github.com/MayJuun/fhir/tree/main/fhir_db

#sqflite  #dart  #flutter 

NBB: Ad-hoc CLJS Scripting on Node.js

Nbb

Not babashka. Node.js babashka!?

Ad-hoc CLJS scripting on Node.js.

Status

Experimental. Please report issues here.

Goals and features

Nbb's main goal is to make it easy to get started with ad hoc CLJS scripting on Node.js.

Additional goals and features are:

  • Fast startup without relying on a custom version of Node.js.
  • Small artifact (current size is around 1.2MB).
  • First class macros.
  • Support building small TUI apps using Reagent.
  • Complement babashka with libraries from the Node.js ecosystem.

Requirements

Nbb requires Node.js v12 or newer.

How does this tool work?

CLJS code is evaluated through SCI, the same interpreter that powers babashka. Because SCI works with advanced compilation, the bundle size, especially when combined with other dependencies, is smaller than what you get with self-hosted CLJS. That makes startup faster. The trade-off is that execution is less performant and that only a subset of CLJS is available (e.g. no deftype, yet).

Usage

Install nbb from NPM:

$ npm install nbb -g

Omit -g for a local install.

Try out an expression:

$ nbb -e '(+ 1 2 3)'
6

And then install some other NPM libraries to use in the script. E.g.:

$ npm install csv-parse shelljs zx

Create a script which uses the NPM libraries:

(ns script
  (:require ["csv-parse/lib/sync$default" :as csv-parse]
            ["fs" :as fs]
            ["path" :as path]
            ["shelljs$default" :as sh]
            ["term-size$default" :as term-size]
            ["zx$default" :as zx]
            ["zx$fs" :as zxfs]
            [nbb.core :refer [*file*]]))

(prn (path/resolve "."))

(prn (term-size))

(println (count (str (fs/readFileSync *file*))))

(prn (sh/ls "."))

(prn (csv-parse "foo,bar"))

(prn (zxfs/existsSync *file*))

(zx/$ #js ["ls"])

Call the script:

$ nbb script.cljs
"/private/tmp/test-script"
#js {:columns 216, :rows 47}
510
#js ["node_modules" "package-lock.json" "package.json" "script.cljs"]
#js [#js ["foo" "bar"]]
true
$ ls
node_modules
package-lock.json
package.json
script.cljs

Macros

Nbb has first class support for macros: you can define them right inside your .cljs file, like you are used to from JVM Clojure. Consider the plet macro to make working with promises more palatable:

(defmacro plet
  [bindings & body]
  (let [binding-pairs (reverse (partition 2 bindings))
        body (cons 'do body)]
    (reduce (fn [body [sym expr]]
              (let [expr (list '.resolve 'js/Promise expr)]
                (list '.then expr (list 'clojure.core/fn (vector sym)
                                        body))))
            body
            binding-pairs)))

Using this macro we can look async code more like sync code. Consider this puppeteer example:

(-> (.launch puppeteer)
      (.then (fn [browser]
               (-> (.newPage browser)
                   (.then (fn [page]
                            (-> (.goto page "https://clojure.org")
                                (.then #(.screenshot page #js{:path "screenshot.png"}))
                                (.catch #(js/console.log %))
                                (.then #(.close browser)))))))))

Using plet this becomes:

(plet [browser (.launch puppeteer)
       page (.newPage browser)
       _ (.goto page "https://clojure.org")
       _ (-> (.screenshot page #js{:path "screenshot.png"})
             (.catch #(js/console.log %)))]
      (.close browser))

See the puppeteer example for the full code.

Since v0.0.36, nbb includes promesa which is a library to deal with promises. The above plet macro is similar to promesa.core/let.

Startup time

$ time nbb -e '(+ 1 2 3)'
6
nbb -e '(+ 1 2 3)'   0.17s  user 0.02s system 109% cpu 0.168 total

The baseline startup time for a script is about 170ms seconds on my laptop. When invoked via npx this adds another 300ms or so, so for faster startup, either use a globally installed nbb or use $(npm bin)/nbb script.cljs to bypass npx.

Dependencies

NPM dependencies

Nbb does not depend on any NPM dependencies. All NPM libraries loaded by a script are resolved relative to that script. When using the Reagent module, React is resolved in the same way as any other NPM library.

Classpath

To load .cljs files from local paths or dependencies, you can use the --classpath argument. The current dir is added to the classpath automatically. So if there is a file foo/bar.cljs relative to your current dir, then you can load it via (:require [foo.bar :as fb]). Note that nbb uses the same naming conventions for namespaces and directories as other Clojure tools: foo-bar in the namespace name becomes foo_bar in the directory name.

To load dependencies from the Clojure ecosystem, you can use the Clojure CLI or babashka to download them and produce a classpath:

$ classpath="$(clojure -A:nbb -Spath -Sdeps '{:aliases {:nbb {:replace-deps {com.github.seancorfield/honeysql {:git/tag "v2.0.0-rc5" :git/sha "01c3a55"}}}}}')"

and then feed it to the --classpath argument:

$ nbb --classpath "$classpath" -e "(require '[honey.sql :as sql]) (sql/format {:select :foo :from :bar :where [:= :baz 2]})"
["SELECT foo FROM bar WHERE baz = ?" 2]

Currently nbb only reads from directories, not jar files, so you are encouraged to use git libs. Support for .jar files will be added later.

Current file

The name of the file that is currently being executed is available via nbb.core/*file* or on the metadata of vars:

(ns foo
  (:require [nbb.core :refer [*file*]]))

(prn *file*) ;; "/private/tmp/foo.cljs"

(defn f [])
(prn (:file (meta #'f))) ;; "/private/tmp/foo.cljs"

Reagent

Nbb includes reagent.core which will be lazily loaded when required. You can use this together with ink to create a TUI application:

$ npm install ink

ink-demo.cljs:

(ns ink-demo
  (:require ["ink" :refer [render Text]]
            [reagent.core :as r]))

(defonce state (r/atom 0))

(doseq [n (range 1 11)]
  (js/setTimeout #(swap! state inc) (* n 500)))

(defn hello []
  [:> Text {:color "green"} "Hello, world! " @state])

(render (r/as-element [hello]))

Promesa

Working with callbacks and promises can become tedious. Since nbb v0.0.36 the promesa.core namespace is included with the let and do! macros. An example:

(ns prom
  (:require [promesa.core :as p]))

(defn sleep [ms]
  (js/Promise.
   (fn [resolve _]
     (js/setTimeout resolve ms))))

(defn do-stuff
  []
  (p/do!
   (println "Doing stuff which takes a while")
   (sleep 1000)
   1))

(p/let [a (do-stuff)
        b (inc a)
        c (do-stuff)
        d (+ b c)]
  (prn d))
$ nbb prom.cljs
Doing stuff which takes a while
Doing stuff which takes a while
3

Also see API docs.

Js-interop

Since nbb v0.0.75 applied-science/js-interop is available:

(ns example
  (:require [applied-science.js-interop :as j]))

(def o (j/lit {:a 1 :b 2 :c {:d 1}}))

(prn (j/select-keys o [:a :b])) ;; #js {:a 1, :b 2}
(prn (j/get-in o [:c :d])) ;; 1

Most of this library is supported in nbb, except the following:

  • destructuring using :syms
  • property access using .-x notation. In nbb, you must use keywords.

See the example of what is currently supported.

Examples

See the examples directory for small examples.

Also check out these projects built with nbb:

API

See API documentation.

Migrating to shadow-cljs

See this gist on how to convert an nbb script or project to shadow-cljs.

Build

Prequisites:

  • babashka >= 0.4.0
  • Clojure CLI >= 1.10.3.933
  • Node.js 16.5.0 (lower version may work, but this is the one I used to build)

To build:

  • Clone and cd into this repo
  • bb release

Run bb tasks for more project-related tasks.

Download Details:
Author: borkdude
Download Link: Download The Source Code
Official Website: https://github.com/borkdude/nbb 
License: EPL-1.0

#node #javascript

Let Developers Just Need to Grasp only One Button Component

 From then on, developers only need to master one Button component, which is enough.

Support corners, borders, icons, special effects, loading mode, high-quality Neumorphism style.

Author:Newton(coorchice.cb@alibaba-inc.com)

✨ Features

Rich corner effect

Exquisite border decoration

Gradient effect

Flexible icon support

Intimate Loading mode

Cool interaction Special effects

More sense of space Shadow

High-quality Neumorphism style

🛠 Guide

⚙️ Parameters

🔩 Basic parameters

ParamTypeNecessaryDefaultdesc
onPressedVoidCallbacktruenullClick callback. If null, FButton will enter an unavailable state
onPressedDownVoidCallbackfalsenullCallback when pressed
onPressedUpVoidCallbackfalsenullCallback when lifted
onPressedCancelVoidCallbackfalsenullCallback when cancel is pressed
heightdoublefalsenullheight
widthdoublefalsenullwidth
styleTextStylefalsenulltext style
disableStyleTextStylefalsenullUnavailable text style
alignmentAlignmentfalsenullalignment
textStringfalsenullbutton text
colorColorfalsenullButton color
disabledColorColorfalsenullColor when FButton is unavailable
paddingEdgeInsetsGeometryfalsenullFButton internal spacing
cornerFCornerfalsenullConfigure corners of Widget
cornerStyleFCornerStylefalseFCornerStyle.roundConfigure the corner style of Widget. round-rounded corners, bevel-beveled
strokeColorColorfalseColors.blackBorder color
strokeWidthdoublefalse0Border width. The border will appear when strokeWidth > 0
gradientGradientfalsenullConfigure gradient colors. Will override the color
activeMaskColorColorColors.transparentThe color of the mask when pressed
surfaceStyleFSurfacefalseFSurface.FlatSurface style. Default [FSurface.Flat]. See [FSurface] for details

💫 Effect parameters

ParamTypeNecessaryDefaultdesc
clickEffectboolfalsefalseWhether to enable click effects
hoverColorColorfalsenullFButton color when hovering
onHoverValueChangedfalsenullCallback when the mouse enters/exits the component range
highlightColorColorfalsenullThe color of the FButton when touched. effect:true required

🔳 Shadow parameters

ParamTypeNecessaryDefaultdesc
shadowColorColorfalseColors.greyShadow color
shadowOffsetOffsetfalseOffset.zeroShadow offset
shadowBlurdoublefalse1.0Shadow blur degree, the larger the value, the larger the shadow range

🖼 Icon & Loading parameters

ParamTypeNecessaryDefaultdesc
imageWidgetfalsenullAn icon can be configured for FButton
imageMargindoublefalse6.0Spacing between icon and text
imageAlignmentImageAlignmentfalseImageAlignment.leftRelative position of icon and text
loadingboolfalsefalseWhether to enter the Loading state
loadingWidgetWidgetfalsenullLoading widget in loading state. Will override the default Loading effect
clickLoadingboolfalsefalseWhether to enter Loading state after clicking FButton
loadingColorColorfalsenullLoading colors
loadingStrokeWidthdoublefalse4.0Loading width
hideTextOnLoadingboolfalsefalseWhether to hide text in the loading state
loadingTextStringfalsenullLoading text
loadingSizedoublefalse12Loading size

🍭 Neumorphism Style

ParamTypeNecessaryDefaultdesc
isSupportNeumorphismboolfalsefalseWhether to support the Neumorphism style. Open this item [highlightColor] will be invalid
lightOrientationFLightOrientationfalseFLightOrientation.LeftTopValid when [isSupportNeumorphism] is true. The direction of the light source is divided into four directions: upper left, lower left, upper right, and lower right. Used to control the illumination direction of the light source, which will affect the highlight direction and shadow direction
highlightShadowColorColorfalsenullAfter the Neumorphism style is turned on, the bright shadow color

📺 Demo

🔩 Basic Demo

// FButton #1
FButton(
  height: 40,
  alignment: Alignment.center,
  text: "FButton #1",
  style: TextStyle(color: Colors.white),
  color: Color(0xffffab91),
  onPressed: () {},
)

// FButton #2
FButton(
  padding: const EdgeInsets.fromLTRB(12, 8, 12, 8),
  text: "FButton #2",
  style: TextStyle(color: Colors.white),
  color: Color(0xffffab91),
  corner: FCorner.all(6.0),
)

// FButton #3
FButton(
  padding: const EdgeInsets.fromLTRB(12, 8, 12, 8),
  text: "FButton #3",
  style: TextStyle(color: Colors.white),
  disableStyle: TextStyle(color: Colors.black38),
  color: Color(0xffF8AD36),

  /// set disable Color
  disabledColor: Colors.grey[300],
  corner: FCorner.all(6.0),
)

By simply configuring text andonPressed, you can construct an available FButton.

If onPressed is not set, FButton will be automatically recognized as not unavailable. At this time, ** FButton ** will have a default unavailable status style.

You can also freely configure the style of FButton when it is not available via the disabledXXX attribute.

🎈 Corner & Stroke

// #1
FButton(
  width: 130,
  text: "FButton #1",
  style: TextStyle(color: Colors.white),
  color: Color(0xffFF7043),
  onPressed: () {},
  clickEffect: true,
  
  /// 配置边角大小
  ///
  /// set corner size
  corner: FCorner.all(25),
),

// #2
FButton(
  width: 130,
  text: "FButton #2",
  style: TextStyle(color: Colors.white),
  color: Color(0xffFFA726),
  onPressed: () {},
  clickEffect: true,
  corner: FCorner(
    leftBottomCorner: 40,
    leftTopCorner: 6,
    rightTopCorner: 40,
    rightBottomCorner: 6,
  ),
),

// #3
FButton(
  width: 130,
  text: "FButton #3",
  style: TextStyle(color: Colors.white),
  color: Color(0xffFFc900),
  onPressed: () {},
  clickEffect: true,
  corner: FCorner(leftTopCorner: 10),
  
  /// 设置边角风格
  ///
  /// set corner style
  cornerStyle: FCornerStyle.bevel,
  strokeWidth: 0.5,
  strokeColor: Color(0xffF9A825),
),

// #4
FButton(
  width: 130,
  padding: EdgeInsets.fromLTRB(6, 16, 30, 16),
  text: "FButton #4",
  style: TextStyle(color: Colors.white),
  color: Color(0xff00B0FF),
  onPressed: () {},
  clickEffect: true,
  corner: FCorner(
      rightTopCorner: 25,
      rightBottomCorner: 25),
  cornerStyle: FCornerStyle.bevel,
  strokeWidth: 0.5,
  strokeColor: Color(0xff000000),
),

You can add rounded corners to FButton via the corner property. You can even control each fillet individually。

By default, the corners of FButton are rounded. By setting cornerStyle: FCornerStyle.bevel, you can get a bevel effect.

FButton supports control borders, provided that strokeWidth> 0 can get the effect 🥳.

🌈 Gradient


FButton(
  width: 100,
  height: 60,
  text: "#1",
  style: TextStyle(color: Colors.white),
  color: Color(0xffFFc900),
  
  /// 配置渐变色
  ///
  /// set gradient
  gradient: LinearGradient(colors: [
    Color(0xff00B0FF),
    Color(0xffFFc900),
  ]),
  onPressed: () {},
  clickEffect: true,
  corner: FCorner.all(8),
)

Through the gradient attribute, you can build FButton with gradient colors. You can freely build many types of gradient colors.

🍭 Icon

FButton(
  width: 88,
  height: 38,
  padding: EdgeInsets.all(0),
  text: "Back",
  style: TextStyle(color: Colors.white),
  color: Color(0xffffc900),
  onPressed: () {
    toast(context, "Back!");
  },
  clickEffect: true,
  corner: FCorner(
    leftTopCorner: 25,
    leftBottomCorner: 25,),
  
  /// 配置图标
  /// 
  /// set icon
  image: Icon(
    Icons.arrow_back_ios,
    color: Colors.white,
    size: 12,
  ),

  /// 配置图标与文字的间距
  ///
  /// Configure the spacing between icon and text
  imageMargin: 8,
),

FButton(
  onPressed: () {},
  image: Icon(
    Icons.print,
    color: Colors.grey,
  ),
  imageMargin: 8,

  /// 配置图标与文字相对位置
  ///
  /// Configure the relative position of icons and text
  imageAlignment: ImageAlignment.top,
  text: "Print",
  style: TextStyle(color: textColor),
  color: Colors.transparent,
),

The image property can set an image for FButton and you can adjust the position of the image relative to the text, throughimageAlignment.

If the button does not need a background, just set color: Colors.transparent.

🔥 Effect


FButton(
  width: 200,
  text: "Try Me!",
  style: TextStyle(color: textColor),
  color: Color(0xffffc900),
  onPressed: () {},
  clickEffect: true,
  corner: FCorner.all(9),
  
  /// 配置按下时颜色
  ///
  /// set pressed color
  highlightColor: Color(0xffE65100).withOpacity(0.20),
  
  /// 配置 hover 状态时颜色
  ///
  /// set hover color
  hoverColor: Colors.redAccent.withOpacity(0.16),
),

The highlight color of FButton can be configured through the highlightColor property。

hoverColor can configure the color when the mouse moves to the range of FButton, which will be used during Web development.

🔆 Loading

FButton(
  text: "Click top loading",
  style: TextStyle(color: textColor),
  color: Color(0xffffc900),
  ...

  /// 配置 loading 大小
  /// 
  /// set loading size
  loadingSize: 15,

  /// 配置 loading 与文本的间距
  ///
  // Configure the spacing between loading and text
  imageMargin: 6,
  
  /// 配置 loading 的宽
  ///
  /// set loading width
  loadingStrokeWidth: 2,

  /// 是否支持点击自动开始 loading
  /// 
  /// Whether to support automatic loading by clicking
  clickLoading: true,

  /// 配置 loading 的颜色
  ///
  /// set loading color
  loadingColor: Colors.white,

  /// 配置 loading 状态时的文本
  /// 
  /// set loading text
  loadingText: "Loading...",

  /// 配置 loading 与文本的相对位置
  ///
  /// Configure the relative position of loading and text
  imageAlignment: ImageAlignment.top,
),

// #2
FButton(
  width: 170,
  height: 70,
  text: "Click to loading",
  style: TextStyle(color: textColor),
  color: Color(0xffffc900),
  onPressed: () { },
  ...
  imageMargin: 8,
  loadingSize: 15,
  loadingStrokeWidth: 2,
  clickLoading: true,
  loadingColor: Colors.white,
  loadingText: "Loading...",

  /// loading 时隐藏文本
  ///
  /// Hide text when loading
  hideTextOnLoading: true,
)


FButton(
  width: 170,
  height: 70,
  alignment: Alignment.center,
  text: "Click to loading",
  style: TextStyle(color: Colors.white),
  color: Color(0xff90caf9),
  ...
  imageMargin: 8,
  clickLoading: true,
  hideTextOnLoading: true,

  /// 配置自定义 loading 样式
  ///
  /// Configure custom loading style
  loadingWidget: CupertinoActivityIndicator(),
),

Through the loading attribute, you can configure Loading effects for ** FButton **.

When FButton is in Loading state, FButton will enter an unavailable state, onPress will no longer be triggered, and unavailable styles will also be applied.

At the same time loadingText will overwritetext if it is not null.

The click start Loading effect can be achieved through the clickLoading attribute.

The position of loading will be affected by theimageAlignment attribute.

When hideTextOnLoading: true, if FButton is inloading state, its text will be hidden.

Through loadingWidget, developers can set completely customized loading styles.

Shadow


FButton(
  width: 200,
  text: "Shadow",
  textColor: Colors.white,
  color: Color(0xffffc900),
  onPressed: () {},
  clickEffect: true,
  corner: FCorner.all(28),
  
  /// 配置阴影颜色
  ///
  /// set shadow color
  shadowColor: Colors.black87,

  /// 设置组件高斯与阴影形状卷积的标准偏差。
  /// 
  /// Sets the standard deviation of the component's Gaussian convolution with the shadow shape.
  shadowBlur: _shadowBlur,
),

FButton allows you to configure the color, size, and position of the shadow.

🍭 Neumorphism Style

FButton(

  /// 开启 Neumorphism 支持
  ///
  /// Turn on Neumorphism support
  isSupportNeumorphism: true,

  /// 配置光源方向
  ///
  /// Configure light source direction
  lightOrientation: lightOrientation,

  /// 配置亮部阴影
  ///
  /// Configure highlight shadow
  highlightShadowColor: Colors.white,

  /// 配置暗部阴影
  ///
  /// Configure dark shadows
  shadowColor: mainShadowColor,
  strokeColor: mainBackgroundColor,
  strokeWidth: 3.0,
  width: 190,
  height: 60,
  text: "FWidget",
  style: TextStyle(
      color: mainTextTitleColor, fontSize: neumorphismSize_2_2),
  alignment: Alignment.center,
  color: mainBackgroundColor,
  ...
)

FButton brings an incredible, ultra-high texture Neumorphism style to developers.

Developers only need to configure the isSupportNeumorphism parameter to enable and disable the Neumorphism style.

If you want to adjust the style of Neumorphism, you can make subtle adjustments through several attributes related to Shadow, among which:

shadowColor: configure the shadow of the shadow

highlightShadowColor: configure highlight shadow

FButton also provides lightOrientation parameters, and even allows developers to adjust the care angle, and has obtained different Neumorphism effects.

😃 How to use?

Add dependencies in the project pubspec.yaml file:

🌐 pub dependency

dependencies:
  fbutton: ^<version number>

⚠️ Attention,please go to [pub] (https://pub.dev/packages/fbutton) to get the latest version number of FButton

🖥 git dependencies

dependencies:
  fbutton:
    git:
      url: 'git@github.com:Fliggy-Mobile/fbutton.git'
      ref: '<Branch number or tag number>'

Use this package as a library

Depend on it

Run this command:

With Flutter:

 $ flutter pub add fbutton_nullsafety

This will add a line like this to your package's pubspec.yaml (and run an implicit flutter pub get):

dependencies:
  fbutton_nullsafety: ^5.0.0

Alternatively, your editor might support or flutter pub get. Check the docs for your editor to learn more.

Import it

Now in your Dart code, you can use:

import 'package:fbutton_nullsafety/fbutton_nullsafety.dart';

Download Details:

Author: Fliggy-Mobile

Source Code: https://github.com/Fliggy-Mobile/fbutton

#button  #flutter 

Aria Barnes

Aria Barnes

1622719015

Why use Node.js for Web Development? Benefits and Examples of Apps

Front-end web development has been overwhelmed by JavaScript highlights for quite a long time. Google, Facebook, Wikipedia, and most of all online pages use JS for customer side activities. As of late, it additionally made a shift to cross-platform mobile development as a main technology in React Native, Nativescript, Apache Cordova, and other crossover devices. 

Throughout the most recent couple of years, Node.js moved to backend development as well. Designers need to utilize a similar tech stack for the whole web project without learning another language for server-side development. Node.js is a device that adjusts JS usefulness and syntax to the backend. 

What is Node.js? 

Node.js isn’t a language, or library, or system. It’s a runtime situation: commonly JavaScript needs a program to work, however Node.js makes appropriate settings for JS to run outside of the program. It’s based on a JavaScript V8 motor that can run in Chrome, different programs, or independently. 

The extent of V8 is to change JS program situated code into machine code — so JS turns into a broadly useful language and can be perceived by servers. This is one of the advantages of utilizing Node.js in web application development: it expands the usefulness of JavaScript, permitting designers to coordinate the language with APIs, different languages, and outside libraries.

What Are the Advantages of Node.js Web Application Development? 

Of late, organizations have been effectively changing from their backend tech stacks to Node.js. LinkedIn picked Node.js over Ruby on Rails since it took care of expanding responsibility better and decreased the quantity of servers by multiple times. PayPal and Netflix did something comparative, just they had a goal to change their design to microservices. We should investigate the motivations to pick Node.JS for web application development and when we are planning to hire node js developers. 

Amazing Tech Stack for Web Development 

The principal thing that makes Node.js a go-to environment for web development is its JavaScript legacy. It’s the most well known language right now with a great many free devices and a functioning local area. Node.js, because of its association with JS, immediately rose in ubiquity — presently it has in excess of 368 million downloads and a great many free tools in the bundle module. 

Alongside prevalence, Node.js additionally acquired the fundamental JS benefits: 

  • quick execution and information preparing; 
  • exceptionally reusable code; 
  • the code is not difficult to learn, compose, read, and keep up; 
  • tremendous asset library, a huge number of free aides, and a functioning local area. 

In addition, it’s a piece of a well known MEAN tech stack (the blend of MongoDB, Express.js, Angular, and Node.js — four tools that handle all vital parts of web application development). 

Designers Can Utilize JavaScript for the Whole Undertaking 

This is perhaps the most clear advantage of Node.js web application development. JavaScript is an unquestionable requirement for web development. Regardless of whether you construct a multi-page or single-page application, you need to know JS well. On the off chance that you are now OK with JavaScript, learning Node.js won’t be an issue. Grammar, fundamental usefulness, primary standards — every one of these things are comparable. 

In the event that you have JS designers in your group, it will be simpler for them to learn JS-based Node than a totally new dialect. What’s more, the front-end and back-end codebase will be basically the same, simple to peruse, and keep up — in light of the fact that they are both JS-based. 

A Quick Environment for Microservice Development 

There’s another motivation behind why Node.js got famous so rapidly. The environment suits well the idea of microservice development (spilling stone monument usefulness into handfuls or many more modest administrations). 

Microservices need to speak with one another rapidly — and Node.js is probably the quickest device in information handling. Among the fundamental Node.js benefits for programming development are its non-obstructing algorithms.

Node.js measures a few demands all at once without trusting that the first will be concluded. Many microservices can send messages to one another, and they will be gotten and addressed all the while. 

Versatile Web Application Development 

Node.js was worked in view of adaptability — its name really says it. The environment permits numerous hubs to run all the while and speak with one another. Here’s the reason Node.js adaptability is better than other web backend development arrangements. 

Node.js has a module that is liable for load adjusting for each running CPU center. This is one of numerous Node.js module benefits: you can run various hubs all at once, and the environment will naturally adjust the responsibility. 

Node.js permits even apportioning: you can part your application into various situations. You show various forms of the application to different clients, in light of their age, interests, area, language, and so on. This builds personalization and diminishes responsibility. Hub accomplishes this with kid measures — tasks that rapidly speak with one another and share a similar root. 

What’s more, Node’s non-hindering solicitation handling framework adds to fast, letting applications measure a great many solicitations. 

Control Stream Highlights

Numerous designers consider nonconcurrent to be one of the two impediments and benefits of Node.js web application development. In Node, at whatever point the capacity is executed, the code consequently sends a callback. As the quantity of capacities develops, so does the number of callbacks — and you end up in a circumstance known as the callback damnation. 

In any case, Node.js offers an exit plan. You can utilize systems that will plan capacities and sort through callbacks. Systems will associate comparable capacities consequently — so you can track down an essential component via search or in an envelope. At that point, there’s no compelling reason to look through callbacks.

 

Final Words

So, these are some of the top benefits of Nodejs in web application development. This is how Nodejs is contributing a lot to the field of web application development. 

I hope now you are totally aware of the whole process of how Nodejs is really important for your web project. If you are looking to hire a node js development company in India then I would suggest that you take a little consultancy too whenever you call. 

Good Luck!

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