What is Spice Trade (SPICE) | What is SPICE token

In this article, we'll discuss information about the Spice Trade project and SPICE token. What is Spice Trade (SPICE) | What is SPICE token?

Trade is defined as transfer of goods and services from one party to another, either as barter, or in exchange for money. Trade has taken place throughout much of recorded human history, and is one of the core tenants of human civilization. 

The core thesis of the Spice Trade protocol is that, there's a massive need for a decentralized, on-chain, open-source, value-stable, scalable, modular, cross-chain, and capital-efficient system for trade among people of the world. Furthermore, such a system should have deep, long-term, and protocol-owned liquidity to reduce friction and maintain tight pegs. It is our belief that creating such a system brings us one step closer to creating a more peaceful and prosperous future for mankind. The first step in building such a system is to re-think 'money' based on the following principles:

On-chain and decentralized: Reduce custodial risk. This stands in direct contrast to centralized stable coins that may have significant custodial risk.

Value-stable: Frictionless trade requires using money whose value does not significantly fluctuate. Value stable is a relative term. For example, depending on the use case, the best money should be designed to be stable relative to national currencies (Such as USD or Euro), a basket of currencies, an inflation adjusted currency, in-game virtual currencies, reward points (imagine a stable coin that traces a hotel or airline point system on chain) etc. The Spice Trade platform allows building appropriate on-chain decentralized money for all these use cases.

Scalable: Money is a tool of trade. The last thing a successful trade network needs is friction in scaling its monetary system.

Modular: As we will demonstrate in the rest of this whitepaper, the Spice Trade protocol is fully modular to accommodate both immediately predicted needs as well future unknown use cases.

Open-Source: Creating an open-source ecosystem where anyone with a good idea can contribute and build on top of the Spice Trade protocol is one of our core values

Capital-Efficient: While over-collateralized on-chain stable coins pioneered the non-custodial money movement, we believe they will play a relatively smaller role in the future of money. Let us present the following hypothetical scenario in the real-world economy to demonstrate the point: Imagine we remove all the currencies in the world. Then, in order to generate any new fiat dollar (so that trade can resume), someone has to take a mortgage against their physical assets, and only then money is generated to enter the circulation. This would create such a tight monetary system that any real world economy would come to a screeching halt and collapse. And recent market trends reflects the above reasoning as well. Over-collateralized on-chain stable coins are falling further behind in market cap rankings relative to both centralized and on-chain algo-stable stable coins due to capital inefficiency.

Cross-Chain: History has shown that technology continuously evolves and improves upon itself. And any product, community, or nation that does not evolve with it will ultimately get left behind. As such, we strongly believe that any successful decentralized product that wants to withstand the test of time needs to be a meta concept that stays above any particular blockchain (or blockchain technology) and can easily be extended and expanded from one chain to another. For example, while Proof-of-Stake seems to be the current king of consensus-building algorithms, who knows what the future might bring. Why build a chain based on today's technology and trap your protocol in it, when we know that the blockchain of the future may look significantly different than that of today?

Protocol-Owned Liquidity based on Starfish Topology: As discussed in future sections, the Spice Trade protocol is designed to have significant liquidity with practically zero cost by building on the concept of Starfish Topology (pioneered by RadioShack: https://docs.radioshack.org/radioshack-defi/terms/disclaimer)

Tokenomics

As such, Spice Trade's initial fully diluted supply will include all the elements that were originally developed for Atlas USV, including:

  • Protocol Owned Defensive Lockbox (PODL)
  • K-Factor Marketing Lockbox (KFML)
  • Reciprocal Altruism Charity Lockbox (RACL)
  • Co-Founder Wallet (CFW)
  • Early Advisors and Capital Partners (EACP)

Three new pools are added to Spice Trade NETD to account for the additional interplay of market participants:

  • Liquidity & Ecosystem Rewards Program (LERP) provides liquidity to RadioShack Starfish (and other future liquidity pools)
  • Protocol Stability Buffer (PSB) provides a buffer against small variances in Spice Protocol's value-stable tokens
  • Protocol Development and User Reward Pools (PDURP) provides incentives for protocol contributors, users, partners, and community to participate and contribute to the protocol as needed

Initial Supply Breakdown

As mentioned before, it is expected that a large portion of the supply is needed for liquidity pairing in the Starfish Topology. As such:

  • Initial SPICE supply on Avalanche (the first chain for launching SPICE) is set at 100M tokens
  • ~30% of each chain's Initial Supply is dedicated to LERP
  • The initial supply of SPICE on all other chains is determined proportional to the square root of TVL across protocols on that chain, as estimated by Defi Llama (https://defillama.com/)

Putting all the above pieces together, the initial supply on each chain is designed as followed:

The daily staking rewards across chains are also set according to the relative ratio of initial supply of SPICE on those chains.

How and Where to Buy SPICE token?

SPICE has been listed on a number of crypto exchanges, unlike other main cryptocurrencies, it cannot be directly purchased with fiats money. However, You can still easily buy this coin by first buying Bitcoin, ETH, USDT, BNB from any large exchanges and then transfer to the exchange that offers to trade this coin, in this guide article we will walk you through in detail the steps to buy SPICE token

You will have to first buy one of the major cryptocurrencies, usually either Bitcoin (BTC), Ethereum (ETH), Tether (USDT), Binance (BNB)…

We will use Binance Exchange here as it is one of the largest crypto exchanges that accept fiat deposits.

Once you finished the KYC process. You will be asked to add a payment method. Here you can either choose to provide a credit/debit card or use a bank transfer, and buy one of the major cryptocurrencies, usually either Bitcoin (BTC), Ethereum (ETH), Tether (USDT), Binance (BNB)…

☞ SIGN UP ON BINANCE

Step by Step Guide : What is Binance | How to Create an account on Binance (Updated 2022)

Once finished you will then need to make a BTC/ETH/USDT/BNB deposit to the exchange from Binance depending on the available market pairs. After the deposit is confirmed you may then purchase SPICE from the exchange.

The top exchange for trading in SPICE token is currently: RadioShack (Avalanche)

🔺DISCLAIMER: The Information in the post isn’t financial advice, is intended FOR GENERAL INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY. Trading Cryptocurrency is VERY risky. Make sure you understand these risks and that you are responsible for what you do with your money.

🔥 If you’re a beginner. I believe the article below will be useful to you ☞ What You Should Know Before Investing in Cryptocurrency - For Beginner

Find more information SPICE token ☞ Website

I hope this post will help you. Don't forget to leave a like, comment and sharing it with others. Thank you!

#bitcoin #cryptocurrency 

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

What is Spice Trade (SPICE) | What is SPICE token
Royce  Reinger

Royce Reinger

1658068560

WordsCounted: A Ruby Natural Language Processor

WordsCounted

We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

-- Oscar Wilde

WordsCounted is a Ruby NLP (natural language processor). WordsCounted lets you implement powerful tokensation strategies with a very flexible tokeniser class.

Features

  • Out of the box, get the following data from any string or readable file, or URL:
    • Token count and unique token count
    • Token densities, frequencies, and lengths
    • Char count and average chars per token
    • The longest tokens and their lengths
    • The most frequent tokens and their frequencies.
  • A flexible way to exclude tokens from the tokeniser. You can pass a string, regexp, symbol, lambda, or an array of any combination of those types for powerful tokenisation strategies.
  • Pass your own regexp rules to the tokeniser if you prefer. The default regexp filters special characters but keeps hyphens and apostrophes. It also plays nicely with diacritics (UTF and unicode characters): Bayrūt is treated as ["Bayrūt"] and not ["Bayr", "ū", "t"], for example.
  • Opens and reads files. Pass in a file path or a url instead of a string.

Installation

Add this line to your application's Gemfile:

gem 'words_counted'

And then execute:

$ bundle

Or install it yourself as:

$ gem install words_counted

Usage

Pass in a string or a file path, and an optional filter and/or regexp.

counter = WordsCounted.count(
  "We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars."
)

# Using a file
counter = WordsCounted.from_file("path/or/url/to/my/file.txt")

.count and .from_file are convenience methods that take an input, tokenise it, and return an instance of WordsCounted::Counter initialized with the tokens. The WordsCounted::Tokeniser and WordsCounted::Counter classes can be used alone, however.

API

WordsCounted

WordsCounted.count(input, options = {})

Tokenises input and initializes a WordsCounted::Counter object with the resulting tokens.

counter = WordsCounted.count("Hello Beirut!")

Accepts two options: exclude and regexp. See Excluding tokens from the analyser and Passing in a custom regexp respectively.

WordsCounted.from_file(path, options = {})

Reads and tokenises a file, and initializes a WordsCounted::Counter object with the resulting tokens.

counter = WordsCounted.from_file("hello_beirut.txt")

Accepts the same options as .count.

Tokeniser

The tokeniser allows you to tokenise text in a variety of ways. You can pass in your own rules for tokenisation, and apply a powerful filter with any combination of rules as long as they can boil down into a lambda.

Out of the box the tokeniser includes only alpha chars. Hyphenated tokens and tokens with apostrophes are considered a single token.

#tokenise([pattern: TOKEN_REGEXP, exclude: nil])

tokeniser = WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new("Hello Beirut!").tokenise

# With `exclude`
tokeniser = WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new("Hello Beirut!").tokenise(exclude: "hello")

# With `pattern`
tokeniser = WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new("I <3 Beirut!").tokenise(pattern: /[a-z]/i)

See Excluding tokens from the analyser and Passing in a custom regexp for more information.

Counter

The WordsCounted::Counter class allows you to collect various statistics from an array of tokens.

#token_count

Returns the token count of a given string.

counter.token_count #=> 15

#token_frequency

Returns a sorted (unstable) two-dimensional array where each element is a token and its frequency. The array is sorted by frequency in descending order.

counter.token_frequency

[
  ["the", 2],
  ["are", 2],
  ["we",  1],
  # ...
  ["all", 1]
]

#most_frequent_tokens

Returns a hash where each key-value pair is a token and its frequency.

counter.most_frequent_tokens

{ "are" => 2, "the" => 2 }

#token_lengths

Returns a sorted (unstable) two-dimentional array where each element contains a token and its length. The array is sorted by length in descending order.

counter.token_lengths

[
  ["looking", 7],
  ["gutter",  6],
  ["stars",   5],
  # ...
  ["in",      2]
]

#longest_tokens

Returns a hash where each key-value pair is a token and its length.

counter.longest_tokens

{ "looking" => 7 }

#token_density([ precision: 2 ])

Returns a sorted (unstable) two-dimentional array where each element contains a token and its density as a float, rounded to a precision of two. The array is sorted by density in descending order. It accepts a precision argument, which must be a float.

counter.token_density

[
  ["are",     0.13],
  ["the",     0.13],
  ["but",     0.07 ],
  # ...
  ["we",      0.07 ]
]

#char_count

Returns the char count of tokens.

counter.char_count #=> 76

#average_chars_per_token([ precision: 2 ])

Returns the average char count per token rounded to two decimal places. Accepts a precision argument which defaults to two. Precision must be a float.

counter.average_chars_per_token #=> 4

#uniq_token_count

Returns the number of unique tokens.

counter.uniq_token_count #=> 13

Excluding tokens from the tokeniser

You can exclude anything you want from the input by passing the exclude option. The exclude option accepts a variety of filters and is extremely flexible.

  1. A space-delimited string. The filter will normalise the string.
  2. A regular expression.
  3. A lambda.
  4. A symbol that names a predicate method. For example :odd?.
  5. An array of any combination of the above.
tokeniser =
  WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new(
    "Magnificent! That was magnificent, Trevor."
  )

# Using a string
tokeniser.tokenise(exclude: "was magnificent")
# => ["that", "trevor"]

# Using a regular expression
tokeniser.tokenise(exclude: /trevor/)
# => ["magnificent", "that", "was", "magnificent"]

# Using a lambda
tokeniser.tokenise(exclude: ->(t) { t.length < 4 })
# => ["magnificent", "that", "magnificent", "trevor"]

# Using symbol
tokeniser = WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new("Hello! محمد")
tokeniser.tokenise(exclude: :ascii_only?)
# => ["محمد"]

# Using an array
tokeniser = WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new(
  "Hello! اسماءنا هي محمد، كارولينا، سامي، وداني"
)
tokeniser.tokenise(
  exclude: [:ascii_only?, /محمد/, ->(t) { t.length > 6}, "و"]
)
# => ["هي", "سامي", "وداني"]

Passing in a custom regexp

The default regexp accounts for letters, hyphenated tokens, and apostrophes. This means twenty-one is treated as one token. So is Mohamad's.

/[\p{Alpha}\-']+/

You can pass your own criteria as a Ruby regular expression to split your string as desired.

For example, if you wanted to include numbers, you can override the regular expression:

counter = WordsCounted.count("Numbers 1, 2, and 3", pattern: /[\p{Alnum}\-']+/)
counter.tokens
#=> ["numbers", "1", "2", "and", "3"]

Opening and reading files

Use the from_file method to open files. from_file accepts the same options as .count. The file path can be a URL.

counter = WordsCounted.from_file("url/or/path/to/file.text")

Gotchas

A hyphen used in leu of an em or en dash will form part of the token. This affects the tokeniser algorithm.

counter = WordsCounted.count("How do you do?-you are well, I see.")
counter.token_frequency

[
  ["do",   2],
  ["how",  1],
  ["you",  1],
  ["-you", 1], # WTF, mate!
  ["are",  1],
  # ...
]

In this example -you and you are separate tokens. Also, the tokeniser does not include numbers by default. Remember that you can pass your own regular expression if the default behaviour does not fit your needs.

A note on case sensitivity

The program will normalise (downcase) all incoming strings for consistency and filters.

Roadmap

Ability to open URLs

def self.from_url
  # open url and send string here after removing html
end

Are you using WordsCounted to do something interesting? Please tell me about it.

Gem Version 

RubyDoc documentation.

Demo

Visit this website for one example of what you can do with WordsCounted.


Contributors

See contributors.

Contributing

  1. Fork it
  2. Create your feature branch (git checkout -b my-new-feature)
  3. Commit your changes (git commit -am 'Add some feature')
  4. Push to the branch (git push origin my-new-feature)
  5. Create new Pull Request

Author: Abitdodgy
Source Code: https://github.com/abitdodgy/words_counted 
License: MIT license

#ruby #nlp 

Words Counted: A Ruby Natural Language Processor.

WordsCounted

We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

-- Oscar Wilde

WordsCounted is a Ruby NLP (natural language processor). WordsCounted lets you implement powerful tokensation strategies with a very flexible tokeniser class.

Are you using WordsCounted to do something interesting? Please tell me about it.

 

Demo

Visit this website for one example of what you can do with WordsCounted.

Features

  • Out of the box, get the following data from any string or readable file, or URL:
    • Token count and unique token count
    • Token densities, frequencies, and lengths
    • Char count and average chars per token
    • The longest tokens and their lengths
    • The most frequent tokens and their frequencies.
  • A flexible way to exclude tokens from the tokeniser. You can pass a string, regexp, symbol, lambda, or an array of any combination of those types for powerful tokenisation strategies.
  • Pass your own regexp rules to the tokeniser if you prefer. The default regexp filters special characters but keeps hyphens and apostrophes. It also plays nicely with diacritics (UTF and unicode characters): Bayrūt is treated as ["Bayrūt"] and not ["Bayr", "ū", "t"], for example.
  • Opens and reads files. Pass in a file path or a url instead of a string.

Installation

Add this line to your application's Gemfile:

gem 'words_counted'

And then execute:

$ bundle

Or install it yourself as:

$ gem install words_counted

Usage

Pass in a string or a file path, and an optional filter and/or regexp.

counter = WordsCounted.count(
  "We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars."
)

# Using a file
counter = WordsCounted.from_file("path/or/url/to/my/file.txt")

.count and .from_file are convenience methods that take an input, tokenise it, and return an instance of WordsCounted::Counter initialized with the tokens. The WordsCounted::Tokeniser and WordsCounted::Counter classes can be used alone, however.

API

WordsCounted

WordsCounted.count(input, options = {})

Tokenises input and initializes a WordsCounted::Counter object with the resulting tokens.

counter = WordsCounted.count("Hello Beirut!")

Accepts two options: exclude and regexp. See Excluding tokens from the analyser and Passing in a custom regexp respectively.

WordsCounted.from_file(path, options = {})

Reads and tokenises a file, and initializes a WordsCounted::Counter object with the resulting tokens.

counter = WordsCounted.from_file("hello_beirut.txt")

Accepts the same options as .count.

Tokeniser

The tokeniser allows you to tokenise text in a variety of ways. You can pass in your own rules for tokenisation, and apply a powerful filter with any combination of rules as long as they can boil down into a lambda.

Out of the box the tokeniser includes only alpha chars. Hyphenated tokens and tokens with apostrophes are considered a single token.

#tokenise([pattern: TOKEN_REGEXP, exclude: nil])

tokeniser = WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new("Hello Beirut!").tokenise

# With `exclude`
tokeniser = WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new("Hello Beirut!").tokenise(exclude: "hello")

# With `pattern`
tokeniser = WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new("I <3 Beirut!").tokenise(pattern: /[a-z]/i)

See Excluding tokens from the analyser and Passing in a custom regexp for more information.

Counter

The WordsCounted::Counter class allows you to collect various statistics from an array of tokens.

#token_count

Returns the token count of a given string.

counter.token_count #=> 15

#token_frequency

Returns a sorted (unstable) two-dimensional array where each element is a token and its frequency. The array is sorted by frequency in descending order.

counter.token_frequency

[
  ["the", 2],
  ["are", 2],
  ["we",  1],
  # ...
  ["all", 1]
]

#most_frequent_tokens

Returns a hash where each key-value pair is a token and its frequency.

counter.most_frequent_tokens

{ "are" => 2, "the" => 2 }

#token_lengths

Returns a sorted (unstable) two-dimentional array where each element contains a token and its length. The array is sorted by length in descending order.

counter.token_lengths

[
  ["looking", 7],
  ["gutter",  6],
  ["stars",   5],
  # ...
  ["in",      2]
]

#longest_tokens

Returns a hash where each key-value pair is a token and its length.

counter.longest_tokens

{ "looking" => 7 }

#token_density([ precision: 2 ])

Returns a sorted (unstable) two-dimentional array where each element contains a token and its density as a float, rounded to a precision of two. The array is sorted by density in descending order. It accepts a precision argument, which must be a float.

counter.token_density

[
  ["are",     0.13],
  ["the",     0.13],
  ["but",     0.07 ],
  # ...
  ["we",      0.07 ]
]

#char_count

Returns the char count of tokens.

counter.char_count #=> 76

#average_chars_per_token([ precision: 2 ])

Returns the average char count per token rounded to two decimal places. Accepts a precision argument which defaults to two. Precision must be a float.

counter.average_chars_per_token #=> 4

#uniq_token_count

Returns the number of unique tokens.

counter.uniq_token_count #=> 13

Excluding tokens from the tokeniser

You can exclude anything you want from the input by passing the exclude option. The exclude option accepts a variety of filters and is extremely flexible.

  1. A space-delimited string. The filter will normalise the string.
  2. A regular expression.
  3. A lambda.
  4. A symbol that names a predicate method. For example :odd?.
  5. An array of any combination of the above.
tokeniser =
  WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new(
    "Magnificent! That was magnificent, Trevor."
  )

# Using a string
tokeniser.tokenise(exclude: "was magnificent")
# => ["that", "trevor"]

# Using a regular expression
tokeniser.tokenise(exclude: /trevor/)
# => ["magnificent", "that", "was", "magnificent"]

# Using a lambda
tokeniser.tokenise(exclude: ->(t) { t.length < 4 })
# => ["magnificent", "that", "magnificent", "trevor"]

# Using symbol
tokeniser = WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new("Hello! محمد")
tokeniser.tokenise(exclude: :ascii_only?)
# => ["محمد"]

# Using an array
tokeniser = WordsCounted::Tokeniser.new(
  "Hello! اسماءنا هي محمد، كارولينا، سامي، وداني"
)
tokeniser.tokenise(
  exclude: [:ascii_only?, /محمد/, ->(t) { t.length > 6}, "و"]
)
# => ["هي", "سامي", "وداني"]

Passing in a custom regexp

The default regexp accounts for letters, hyphenated tokens, and apostrophes. This means twenty-one is treated as one token. So is Mohamad's.

/[\p{Alpha}\-']+/

You can pass your own criteria as a Ruby regular expression to split your string as desired.

For example, if you wanted to include numbers, you can override the regular expression:

counter = WordsCounted.count("Numbers 1, 2, and 3", pattern: /[\p{Alnum}\-']+/)
counter.tokens
#=> ["numbers", "1", "2", "and", "3"]

Opening and reading files

Use the from_file method to open files. from_file accepts the same options as .count. The file path can be a URL.

counter = WordsCounted.from_file("url/or/path/to/file.text")

Gotchas

A hyphen used in leu of an em or en dash will form part of the token. This affects the tokeniser algorithm.

counter = WordsCounted.count("How do you do?-you are well, I see.")
counter.token_frequency

[
  ["do",   2],
  ["how",  1],
  ["you",  1],
  ["-you", 1], # WTF, mate!
  ["are",  1],
  # ...
]

In this example -you and you are separate tokens. Also, the tokeniser does not include numbers by default. Remember that you can pass your own regular expression if the default behaviour does not fit your needs.

A note on case sensitivity

The program will normalise (downcase) all incoming strings for consistency and filters.

Roadmap

Ability to open URLs

def self.from_url
  # open url and send string here after removing html
end

Contributors

See contributors.

Contributing

  1. Fork it
  2. Create your feature branch (git checkout -b my-new-feature)
  3. Commit your changes (git commit -am 'Add some feature')
  4. Push to the branch (git push origin my-new-feature)
  5. Create new Pull Request

Author: abitdodgy
Source code: https://github.com/abitdodgy/words_counted
License: MIT license

#ruby  #ruby-on-rails 

aaron silva

aaron silva

1622197808

SafeMoon Clone | Create A DeFi Token Like SafeMoon | DeFi token like SafeMoon

SafeMoon is a decentralized finance (DeFi) token. This token consists of RFI tokenomics and auto-liquidity generating protocol. A DeFi token like SafeMoon has reached the mainstream standards under the Binance Smart Chain. Its success and popularity have been immense, thus, making the majority of the business firms adopt this style of cryptocurrency as an alternative.

A DeFi token like SafeMoon is almost similar to the other crypto-token, but the only difference being that it charges a 10% transaction fee from the users who sell their tokens, in which 5% of the fee is distributed to the remaining SafeMoon owners. This feature rewards the owners for holding onto their tokens.

Read More @ https://bit.ly/3oFbJoJ

#create a defi token like safemoon #defi token like safemoon #safemoon token #safemoon token clone #defi token

SIMPLE BITCOIN TRADING STRATEGY | HOW TO FIND THE BEST TRADES

📺 The video in this post was made by Jayson Casper
The origin of the article: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SlFEwzrPKSk
🔺 DISCLAIMER: The article is for information sharing. The content of this video is solely the opinions of the speaker who is not a licensed financial advisor or registered investment advisor. Not investment advice or legal advice.
Cryptocurrency trading is VERY risky. Make sure you understand these risks and that you are responsible for what you do with your money
🔥 If you’re a beginner. I believe the article below will be useful to you ☞ What You Should Know Before Investing in Cryptocurrency - For Beginner
⭐ ⭐ ⭐The project is of interest to the community. Join to Get free ‘GEEK coin’ (GEEKCASH coin)!
☞ **-----CLICK HERE-----**⭐ ⭐ ⭐
(There is no limit to the amount of credit you can earn through referrals)
Thanks for visiting and watching! Please don’t forget to leave a like, comment and share!

#bitcoin #blockchain #bitcoin trading #bitcoin trading strategy #simple bitcoin trading strategy #simple bitcoin trading strategy | how to find the best trades

aaron silva

aaron silva

1617958563

Cryptocurrency Trading Software | Crypto Trading Software

A Cryptocurrency Trading Software is a place where it creates a platform for investors and cryptocurrency traders who want to hire advanced digital tools and technology (i,e, Trading Bot) to realize and earn more revenue from that trading platform.
This platform allows you to trade for Ethereum, Litecoin, Bitcoin (BTC), and many more with ease. These modern tools will take care of your business prerequisites and will make way for your business to stand unique among your competitors.

What is a Crypto Trading Bot?

Cryptocurrency Trading Bot is a digital program that buys and sells cryptocurrencies in keeping with user’s preferences. The user can set an algorithm on the program to handle the bot what to buy and sell and stores the profits in the crypto wallet.

Its Features includes the subsequent noteworthy points:

  • Margin Trading is a facility offered for users where it helps to borrow money to shop for assets that they can’t afford.
  • It matches the trading engine with other users within the platform precisely.
  • Custom-made UI/UX is obtainable on the platform.
  • Unified Web Crypto Wallet.
  • Margin Lending allows the borrowee to lend some funds to the borrower and earn interest on a daily basis.
  • The trading software will work as per your requirements like order book section choices, enables you to line your wish accordingly with other parties within the platform.
  • The trading bot will handle all types of transactions & exchanges of the user and store the profits.

So, grab the industries leading exchange platform development company to sweep through all the obstacles that enter your way while creating your customizable trading platform.

#crypto trading bot #cryptocurrency trading software #exchange platform development #trading platform #trading software