How To Create A Composer Package? Test It Locally And Add To Packagist Repository

Hello friends in this article, you will learn a simple way to create a composer package & add it to packagist. Let’s built RSS Generating package as an example. Here I wont be explaining a whole project code, will add some partial code which will give you good understanding.

This article covers how to

  1. Composer Package Project Setup
  2. To Test Your Package Locally Before Pushing To Packagist
  3. Setup Project For GIT Releases
  4. Push Package To Setup

Prerequisites

Basic knowledge on composer & write PHP scripts, in case if your new to composer or would like to know in depth knowledge this please refer this article What Is Composer? How Does It Work? Useful Composer Commands And Usage.


1) Composer Package Project Setup

First create a project folder in wwwhtml or htdocs folder when you run your basic php projects.

For our example I have created **rss** inside **htdocs** folder.

i. Create composer.json file

Basically my folder structure is as follows

RSS Composer Package Folder StructureRSS Composer Package Folder Structure

You project must have the composer.json file in the root of your project folder as shown in the above image and will have the following content

{
    "name": "channaveer/rss",
    "description": "Simple RSS 2.0 Generator",
    "keywords": ["rss", "rss2.0", "simple-rss", "rss-generator"],
    "type": "library",
    "license": "MIT",
    "authors": [
        {
            "name": "Channaveer Hakari",
            "email": "channaveer888@gmail.com",
            "homepage": "https://stackcoder.in/about-me",
            "role": "Developer"
        }
    ],
    "require": {
        "php": ">=5.6.0"
    },
    "autoload": {
        "psr-4": {
            "Channaveer\\RSS\\": "src/"
        }
    },
    "extra": {
        "branch-alias": {
            "dev-master": "1.0-dev"
        }
    },
    "minimum-stability": "dev",
    "config": {
        "sort-packages": true
    }
}

**name** - Package name of your project, make sure that this must be unique

**description** - Description of your project

**keywords** - Keywords your project needs to be searched for

**type** - Mine is library, if you are creating something like Laravel then this will be project

**license**** - **Type of license of your project

**author** - Array of author details

**require** - What packages does your project depends on add it over here. Mine doesn’t depend on any so I left empty here

**require-dev** - If your project depends on any development packages then add it here like PHPUnit

**autoload**-Here you can autoload the default folder & files that is need by your project

I would like to add more details for autoload over here

"psr-4": {
    "Channaveer\\RSS\\": "src/"
}

Here I would like to explain about **autoload, **all the files from **src/** folder of my composer project will be auto loaded. All the files inside this **src/** folder will have the namespace with Channaveer\RSS namespace. Make sure to add it as Channaveer\RSS\ as is.

#coding #testing #stackcoder #packagist repository

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

How To Create A Composer Package? Test It Locally And Add To Packagist Repository
Easter  Deckow

Easter Deckow

1655630160

PyTumblr: A Python Tumblr API v2 Client

PyTumblr

Installation

Install via pip:

$ pip install pytumblr

Install from source:

$ git clone https://github.com/tumblr/pytumblr.git
$ cd pytumblr
$ python setup.py install

Usage

Create a client

A pytumblr.TumblrRestClient is the object you'll make all of your calls to the Tumblr API through. Creating one is this easy:

client = pytumblr.TumblrRestClient(
    '<consumer_key>',
    '<consumer_secret>',
    '<oauth_token>',
    '<oauth_secret>',
)

client.info() # Grabs the current user information

Two easy ways to get your credentials to are:

  1. The built-in interactive_console.py tool (if you already have a consumer key & secret)
  2. The Tumblr API console at https://api.tumblr.com/console
  3. Get sample login code at https://api.tumblr.com/console/calls/user/info

Supported Methods

User Methods

client.info() # get information about the authenticating user
client.dashboard() # get the dashboard for the authenticating user
client.likes() # get the likes for the authenticating user
client.following() # get the blogs followed by the authenticating user

client.follow('codingjester.tumblr.com') # follow a blog
client.unfollow('codingjester.tumblr.com') # unfollow a blog

client.like(id, reblogkey) # like a post
client.unlike(id, reblogkey) # unlike a post

Blog Methods

client.blog_info(blogName) # get information about a blog
client.posts(blogName, **params) # get posts for a blog
client.avatar(blogName) # get the avatar for a blog
client.blog_likes(blogName) # get the likes on a blog
client.followers(blogName) # get the followers of a blog
client.blog_following(blogName) # get the publicly exposed blogs that [blogName] follows
client.queue(blogName) # get the queue for a given blog
client.submission(blogName) # get the submissions for a given blog

Post Methods

Creating posts

PyTumblr lets you create all of the various types that Tumblr supports. When using these types there are a few defaults that are able to be used with any post type.

The default supported types are described below.

  • state - a string, the state of the post. Supported types are published, draft, queue, private
  • tags - a list, a list of strings that you want tagged on the post. eg: ["testing", "magic", "1"]
  • tweet - a string, the string of the customized tweet you want. eg: "Man I love my mega awesome post!"
  • date - a string, the customized GMT that you want
  • format - a string, the format that your post is in. Support types are html or markdown
  • slug - a string, the slug for the url of the post you want

We'll show examples throughout of these default examples while showcasing all the specific post types.

Creating a photo post

Creating a photo post supports a bunch of different options plus the described default options * caption - a string, the user supplied caption * link - a string, the "click-through" url for the photo * source - a string, the url for the photo you want to use (use this or the data parameter) * data - a list or string, a list of filepaths or a single file path for multipart file upload

#Creates a photo post using a source URL
client.create_photo(blogName, state="published", tags=["testing", "ok"],
                    source="https://68.media.tumblr.com/b965fbb2e501610a29d80ffb6fb3e1ad/tumblr_n55vdeTse11rn1906o1_500.jpg")

#Creates a photo post using a local filepath
client.create_photo(blogName, state="queue", tags=["testing", "ok"],
                    tweet="Woah this is an incredible sweet post [URL]",
                    data="/Users/johnb/path/to/my/image.jpg")

#Creates a photoset post using several local filepaths
client.create_photo(blogName, state="draft", tags=["jb is cool"], format="markdown",
                    data=["/Users/johnb/path/to/my/image.jpg", "/Users/johnb/Pictures/kittens.jpg"],
                    caption="## Mega sweet kittens")

Creating a text post

Creating a text post supports the same options as default and just a two other parameters * title - a string, the optional title for the post. Supports markdown or html * body - a string, the body of the of the post. Supports markdown or html

#Creating a text post
client.create_text(blogName, state="published", slug="testing-text-posts", title="Testing", body="testing1 2 3 4")

Creating a quote post

Creating a quote post supports the same options as default and two other parameter * quote - a string, the full text of the qote. Supports markdown or html * source - a string, the cited source. HTML supported

#Creating a quote post
client.create_quote(blogName, state="queue", quote="I am the Walrus", source="Ringo")

Creating a link post

  • title - a string, the title of post that you want. Supports HTML entities.
  • url - a string, the url that you want to create a link post for.
  • description - a string, the desciption of the link that you have
#Create a link post
client.create_link(blogName, title="I like to search things, you should too.", url="https://duckduckgo.com",
                   description="Search is pretty cool when a duck does it.")

Creating a chat post

Creating a chat post supports the same options as default and two other parameters * title - a string, the title of the chat post * conversation - a string, the text of the conversation/chat, with diablog labels (no html)

#Create a chat post
chat = """John: Testing can be fun!
Renee: Testing is tedious and so are you.
John: Aw.
"""
client.create_chat(blogName, title="Renee just doesn't understand.", conversation=chat, tags=["renee", "testing"])

Creating an audio post

Creating an audio post allows for all default options and a has 3 other parameters. The only thing to keep in mind while dealing with audio posts is to make sure that you use the external_url parameter or data. You cannot use both at the same time. * caption - a string, the caption for your post * external_url - a string, the url of the site that hosts the audio file * data - a string, the filepath of the audio file you want to upload to Tumblr

#Creating an audio file
client.create_audio(blogName, caption="Rock out.", data="/Users/johnb/Music/my/new/sweet/album.mp3")

#lets use soundcloud!
client.create_audio(blogName, caption="Mega rock out.", external_url="https://soundcloud.com/skrillex/sets/recess")

Creating a video post

Creating a video post allows for all default options and has three other options. Like the other post types, it has some restrictions. You cannot use the embed and data parameters at the same time. * caption - a string, the caption for your post * embed - a string, the HTML embed code for the video * data - a string, the path of the file you want to upload

#Creating an upload from YouTube
client.create_video(blogName, caption="Jon Snow. Mega ridiculous sword.",
                    embed="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=40pUYLacrj4")

#Creating a video post from local file
client.create_video(blogName, caption="testing", data="/Users/johnb/testing/ok/blah.mov")

Editing a post

Updating a post requires you knowing what type a post you're updating. You'll be able to supply to the post any of the options given above for updates.

client.edit_post(blogName, id=post_id, type="text", title="Updated")
client.edit_post(blogName, id=post_id, type="photo", data="/Users/johnb/mega/awesome.jpg")

Reblogging a Post

Reblogging a post just requires knowing the post id and the reblog key, which is supplied in the JSON of any post object.

client.reblog(blogName, id=125356, reblog_key="reblog_key")

Deleting a post

Deleting just requires that you own the post and have the post id

client.delete_post(blogName, 123456) # Deletes your post :(

A note on tags: When passing tags, as params, please pass them as a list (not a comma-separated string):

client.create_text(blogName, tags=['hello', 'world'], ...)

Getting notes for a post

In order to get the notes for a post, you need to have the post id and the blog that it is on.

data = client.notes(blogName, id='123456')

The results include a timestamp you can use to make future calls.

data = client.notes(blogName, id='123456', before_timestamp=data["_links"]["next"]["query_params"]["before_timestamp"])

Tagged Methods

# get posts with a given tag
client.tagged(tag, **params)

Using the interactive console

This client comes with a nice interactive console to run you through the OAuth process, grab your tokens (and store them for future use).

You'll need pyyaml installed to run it, but then it's just:

$ python interactive-console.py

and away you go! Tokens are stored in ~/.tumblr and are also shared by other Tumblr API clients like the Ruby client.

Running tests

The tests (and coverage reports) are run with nose, like this:

python setup.py test

Author: tumblr
Source Code: https://github.com/tumblr/pytumblr
License: Apache-2.0 license

#python #api 

How To Create A Composer Package? Test It Locally And Add To Packagist Repository

Hello friends in this article, you will learn a simple way to create a composer package & add it to packagist. Let’s built RSS Generating package as an example. Here I wont be explaining a whole project code, will add some partial code which will give you good understanding.

This article covers how to

  1. Composer Package Project Setup
  2. To Test Your Package Locally Before Pushing To Packagist
  3. Setup Project For GIT Releases
  4. Push Package To Setup

Prerequisites

Basic knowledge on composer & write PHP scripts, in case if your new to composer or would like to know in depth knowledge this please refer this article What Is Composer? How Does It Work? Useful Composer Commands And Usage.


1) Composer Package Project Setup

First create a project folder in wwwhtml or htdocs folder when you run your basic php projects.

For our example I have created **rss** inside **htdocs** folder.

i. Create composer.json file

Basically my folder structure is as follows

RSS Composer Package Folder StructureRSS Composer Package Folder Structure

You project must have the composer.json file in the root of your project folder as shown in the above image and will have the following content

{
    "name": "channaveer/rss",
    "description": "Simple RSS 2.0 Generator",
    "keywords": ["rss", "rss2.0", "simple-rss", "rss-generator"],
    "type": "library",
    "license": "MIT",
    "authors": [
        {
            "name": "Channaveer Hakari",
            "email": "channaveer888@gmail.com",
            "homepage": "https://stackcoder.in/about-me",
            "role": "Developer"
        }
    ],
    "require": {
        "php": ">=5.6.0"
    },
    "autoload": {
        "psr-4": {
            "Channaveer\\RSS\\": "src/"
        }
    },
    "extra": {
        "branch-alias": {
            "dev-master": "1.0-dev"
        }
    },
    "minimum-stability": "dev",
    "config": {
        "sort-packages": true
    }
}

**name** - Package name of your project, make sure that this must be unique

**description** - Description of your project

**keywords** - Keywords your project needs to be searched for

**type** - Mine is library, if you are creating something like Laravel then this will be project

**license**** - **Type of license of your project

**author** - Array of author details

**require** - What packages does your project depends on add it over here. Mine doesn’t depend on any so I left empty here

**require-dev** - If your project depends on any development packages then add it here like PHPUnit

**autoload**-Here you can autoload the default folder & files that is need by your project

I would like to add more details for autoload over here

"psr-4": {
    "Channaveer\\RSS\\": "src/"
}

Here I would like to explain about **autoload, **all the files from **src/** folder of my composer project will be auto loaded. All the files inside this **src/** folder will have the namespace with Channaveer\RSS namespace. Make sure to add it as Channaveer\RSS\ as is.

#coding #testing #stackcoder #packagist repository

Live Webinar, Testing Superpowers: Using CLion to Add Tests Easily

CLion is great for refactoring C++ code to make it more maintainable.
But as someone asked in Arne Mertz’s “Refactoring C++ Code” webinar, “What can we do if we don’t have tests on the project and can’t easily check the changes introduced by refactorings?
In this webinar you will learn how to:

  • Add tests for untested code, quickly and safely.
  • Use CLion’s code coverage tools to guide your testing.
  • Use Approval Tests to get good coverage really quickly, and explore the behavior of the code.

#testing #clion #tests #live webinar #testing superpowers #add tests

Tamia  Walter

Tamia Walter

1596754901

Testing Microservices Applications

The shift towards microservices and modular applications makes testing more important and more challenging at the same time. You have to make sure that the microservices running in containers perform well and as intended, but you can no longer rely on conventional testing strategies to get the job done.

This is where new testing approaches are needed. Testing your microservices applications require the right approach, a suitable set of tools, and immense attention to details. This article will guide you through the process of testing your microservices and talk about the challenges you will have to overcome along the way. Let’s get started, shall we?

A Brave New World

Traditionally, testing a monolith application meant configuring a test environment and setting up all of the application components in a way that matched the production environment. It took time to set up the testing environment, and there were a lot of complexities around the process.

Testing also requires the application to run in full. It is not possible to test monolith apps on a per-component basis, mainly because there is usually a base code that ties everything together, and the app is designed to run as a complete app to work properly.

Microservices running in containers offer one particular advantage: universal compatibility. You don’t have to match the testing environment with the deployment architecture exactly, and you can get away with testing individual components rather than the full app in some situations.

Of course, you will have to embrace the new cloud-native approach across the pipeline. Rather than creating critical dependencies between microservices, you need to treat each one as a semi-independent module.

The only monolith or centralized portion of the application is the database, but this too is an easy challenge to overcome. As long as you have a persistent database running on your test environment, you can perform tests at any time.

Keep in mind that there are additional things to focus on when testing microservices.

  • Microservices rely on network communications to talk to each other, so network reliability and requirements must be part of the testing.
  • Automation and infrastructure elements are now added as codes, and you have to make sure that they also run properly when microservices are pushed through the pipeline
  • While containerization is universal, you still have to pay attention to specific dependencies and create a testing strategy that allows for those dependencies to be included

Test containers are the method of choice for many developers. Unlike monolith apps, which lets you use stubs and mocks for testing, microservices need to be tested in test containers. Many CI/CD pipelines actually integrate production microservices as part of the testing process.

Contract Testing as an Approach

As mentioned before, there are many ways to test microservices effectively, but the one approach that developers now use reliably is contract testing. Loosely coupled microservices can be tested in an effective and efficient way using contract testing, mainly because this testing approach focuses on contracts; in other words, it focuses on how components or microservices communicate with each other.

Syntax and semantics construct how components communicate with each other. By defining syntax and semantics in a standardized way and testing microservices based on their ability to generate the right message formats and meet behavioral expectations, you can rest assured knowing that the microservices will behave as intended when deployed.

Ways to Test Microservices

It is easy to fall into the trap of making testing microservices complicated, but there are ways to avoid this problem. Testing microservices doesn’t have to be complicated at all when you have the right strategy in place.

There are several ways to test microservices too, including:

  • Unit testing: Which allows developers to test microservices in a granular way. It doesn’t limit testing to individual microservices, but rather allows developers to take a more granular approach such as testing individual features or runtimes.
  • Integration testing: Which handles the testing of microservices in an interactive way. Microservices still need to work with each other when they are deployed, and integration testing is a key process in making sure that they do.
  • End-to-end testing: Which⁠—as the name suggests⁠—tests microservices as a complete app. This type of testing enables the testing of features, UI, communications, and other components that construct the app.

What’s important to note is the fact that these testing approaches allow for asynchronous testing. After all, asynchronous development is what makes developing microservices very appealing in the first place. By allowing for asynchronous testing, you can also make sure that components or microservices can be updated independently to one another.

#blog #microservices #testing #caylent #contract testing #end-to-end testing #hoverfly #integration testing #microservices #microservices architecture #pact #testing #unit testing #vagrant #vcr

Rui  Silva

Rui Silva

1641884883

Como anexar A Uma Lista Ou Matriz Em Python Como Um Profissional

Neste artigo, você aprenderá sobre o .append()método em Python. Você também verá como .append()difere de outros métodos usados ​​para adicionar elementos a listas.

Vamos começar!

O que são listas em Python? Uma definição para iniciantes

Uma matriz na programação é uma coleção ordenada de itens e todos os itens precisam ser do mesmo tipo de dados.

No entanto, ao contrário de outras linguagens de programação, os arrays não são uma estrutura de dados embutida no Python. Em vez de arrays tradicionais, o Python usa listas.

Listas são essencialmente arrays dinâmicos e são uma das estruturas de dados mais comuns e poderosas em Python.

Você pode pensar neles como contêineres ordenados. Eles armazenam e organizam tipos semelhantes de dados relacionados juntos.

Os elementos armazenados em uma lista podem ser de qualquer tipo de dados.

Pode haver listas de inteiros (números inteiros), listas de floats (números de ponto flutuante), listas de strings (texto) e listas de qualquer outro tipo de dados interno do Python.

Embora seja possível que as listas contenham apenas itens do mesmo tipo de dados, elas são mais flexíveis do que as matrizes tradicionais. Isso significa que pode haver uma variedade de tipos de dados diferentes dentro da mesma lista.

As listas têm 0 ou mais itens, o que significa que também pode haver listas vazias. Dentro de uma lista também pode haver valores duplicados.

Os valores são separados por uma vírgula e colocados entre colchetes, [].

Como criar listas em Python

Para criar uma nova lista, primeiro dê um nome à lista. Em seguida, adicione o operador de atribuição ( =) e um par de colchetes de abertura e fechamento. Dentro dos colchetes, adicione os valores que você deseja que a lista contenha.

#create a new list of names
names = ["Jimmy", "Timmy", "Kenny", "Lenny"]

#print the list to the console
print(names)

#output
#['Jimmy', 'Timmy', 'Kenny', 'Lenny']

Como as listas são indexadas em Python

As listas mantêm uma ordem para cada item.

Cada item na coleção tem seu próprio número de índice, que você pode usar para acessar o próprio item.

Índices em Python (e em qualquer outra linguagem de programação moderna) começam em 0 e aumentam para cada item da lista.

Por exemplo, a lista criada anteriormente tinha 4 valores:

names = ["Jimmy", "Timmy", "Kenny", "Lenny"]

O primeiro valor na lista, "Jimmy", tem um índice de 0.

O segundo valor na lista, "Timmy", tem um índice de 1.

O terceiro valor na lista, "Kenny", tem um índice de 2.

O quarto valor na lista, "Lenny", tem um índice de 3.

Para acessar um elemento na lista por seu número de índice, primeiro escreva o nome da lista, depois entre colchetes escreva o inteiro do índice do elemento.

Por exemplo, se você quisesse acessar o elemento que tem um índice de 2, você faria:

names = ["Jimmy", "Timmy", "Kenny", "Lenny"]

print(names[2])

#output
#Kenny

Listas em Python são mutáveis

Em Python, quando os objetos são mutáveis , significa que seus valores podem ser alterados depois de criados.

As listas são objetos mutáveis, portanto, você pode atualizá-las e alterá-las depois de criadas.

As listas também são dinâmicas, o que significa que podem crescer e diminuir ao longo da vida de um programa.

Os itens podem ser removidos de uma lista existente e novos itens podem ser adicionados a uma lista existente.

Existem métodos internos para adicionar e remover itens de listas.

Por exemplo, para add itens, há as .append(), .insert()e .extend()métodos.

Para remove itens, há as .remove(), .pop()e .pop(index)métodos.

O que o .append()método faz?

O .append()método adiciona um elemento adicional ao final de uma lista já existente.

A sintaxe geral se parece com isso:

list_name.append(item)

Vamos decompô-lo:

  • list_name é o nome que você deu à lista.
  • .append()é o método de lista para adicionar um item ao final de list_name.
  • item é o item individual especificado que você deseja adicionar.

Ao usar .append(), a lista original é modificada. Nenhuma nova lista é criada.

Se você quiser adicionar um nome extra à lista criada anteriormente, faça o seguinte:

names = ["Jimmy", "Timmy", "Kenny", "Lenny"]

#add the name Dylan to the end of the list
names.append("Dylan")

print(names)

#output
#['Jimmy', 'Timmy', 'Kenny', 'Lenny', 'Dylan']

Qual é a diferença entre os métodos .append()e .insert()?

A diferença entre os dois métodos é que .append()adiciona um item ao final de uma lista, enquanto .insert()insere um item em uma posição especificada na lista.

Como você viu na seção anterior, .append()irá adicionar o item que você passar como argumento para a função sempre no final da lista.

Se você não quiser apenas adicionar itens ao final de uma lista, poderá especificar a posição com a qual deseja adicioná-los .insert().

A sintaxe geral fica assim:

list_name.insert(position,item)

Vamos decompô-lo:

  • list_name é o nome da lista.
  • .insert() é o método de lista para inserir um item em uma lista.
  • positioné o primeiro argumento para o método. É sempre um número inteiro - especificamente é o número de índice da posição onde você deseja que o novo item seja colocado.
  • itemé o segundo argumento para o método. Aqui você especifica o novo item que deseja adicionar à lista.

Por exemplo, digamos que você tenha a seguinte lista de linguagens de programação:

programming_languages = ["JavaScript", "Java", "C++"]

print(programming_languages)

#output
#['JavaScript', 'Java', 'C++']

Se você quisesse inserir "Python" no início da lista, como um novo item da lista, você usaria o .insert()método e especificaria a posição como 0. (Lembre-se de que o primeiro valor em uma lista sempre tem um índice de 0.)

programming_languages = ["JavaScript", "Java", "C++"]

programming_languages.insert(0, "Python")

print(programming_languages)

#output
#['Python', 'JavaScript', 'Java', 'C++']

Se, em vez disso, você quisesse que "JavaScript" fosse o primeiro item da lista e, em seguida, adicionasse "Python" como o novo item, você especificaria a posição como 1:

programming_languages = ["JavaScript", "Java", "C++"]

programming_languages.insert(1,"Python")

print(programming_languages)

#output
#['JavaScript', 'Python', 'Java', 'C++']

O .insert()método oferece um pouco mais de flexibilidade em comparação com o .append()método que apenas adiciona um novo item ao final da lista.

Qual é a diferença entre os métodos .append()e .extend()?

E se você quiser adicionar mais de um item a uma lista de uma só vez, em vez de adicioná-los um de cada vez?

Você pode usar o .append()método para adicionar mais de um item ao final de uma lista.

Digamos que você tenha uma lista que contém apenas duas linguagens de programação:

programming_languages = ["JavaScript", "Java"]

print(programming_languages)

#output
#['JavaScript', 'Java']

Você então deseja adicionar mais dois idiomas, no final dele.

Nesse caso, você passa uma lista contendo os dois novos valores que deseja adicionar, como argumento para .append():

programming_languages = ["JavaScript", "Java"]

#add two new items to the end of the list
programming_languages.append(["Python","C++"])

print(programming_languages)

#output
#['JavaScript', 'Java', ['Python', 'C++']]

Se você observar mais de perto a saída acima, ['JavaScript', 'Java', ['Python', 'C++']], verá que uma nova lista foi adicionada ao final da lista já existente.

Então, .append() adiciona uma lista dentro de uma lista .

Listas são objetos, e quando você usa .append()para adicionar outra lista em uma lista, os novos itens serão adicionados como um único objeto (item).

Digamos que você já tenha duas listas, assim:

names = ["Jimmy", "Timmy"]
more_names = ["Kenny", "Lenny"]

E se você quiser combinar o conteúdo de ambas as listas em uma, adicionando o conteúdo de more_namesa names?

Quando o .append()método é usado para essa finalidade, outra lista é criada dentro de names:

names = ["Jimmy", "Timmy"]
more_names = ["Kenny", "Lenny"]

#add contents of more_names to names
names.append(more_names)

print(names)

#output
#['Jimmy', 'Timmy', ['Kenny', 'Lenny']]

Então, .append()adiciona os novos elementos como outra lista, anexando o objeto ao final.

Para realmente concatenar (adicionar) listas e combinar todos os itens de uma lista para outra , você precisa usar o .extend()método.

A sintaxe geral fica assim:

list_name.extend(iterable/other_list_name)

Vamos decompô-lo:

  • list_name é o nome de uma das listas.
  • .extend() é o método para adicionar todo o conteúdo de uma lista a outra.
  • iterablepode ser qualquer iterável, como outra lista, por exemplo, another_list_name. Nesse caso, another_list_nameé uma lista que será concatenada com list_name, e seu conteúdo será adicionado um a um ao final de list_name, como itens separados.

Então, tomando o exemplo anterior, quando .append()for substituído por .extend(), a saída ficará assim:

names = ["Jimmy", "Timmy"]
more_names = ["Kenny", "Lenny"]

names.extend(more_names)

print(names)

#output
#['Jimmy', 'Timmy', 'Kenny', 'Lenny']

Quando usamos .extend(), a nameslista foi estendida e seu comprimento aumentado em 2.

A maneira como .extend()funciona é que ele pega uma lista (ou outro iterável) como argumento, itera sobre cada elemento e, em seguida, cada elemento no iterável é adicionado à lista.

Há outra diferença entre .append()e .extend().

Quando você deseja adicionar uma string, como visto anteriormente, .append()adiciona o item inteiro e único ao final da lista:

names = ["Jimmy", "Timmy", "Kenny", "Lenny"]

#add the name Dylan to the end of the list
names.append("Dylan")

print(names)

#output
#['Jimmy', 'Timmy', 'Kenny', 'Lenny', 'Dylan']

Se, em .extend()vez disso, você adicionasse uma string ao final de uma lista, cada caractere na string seria adicionado como um item individual à lista.

Isso ocorre porque as strings são iteráveis ​​e .extend()iteram sobre o argumento iterável passado para ela.

Então, o exemplo acima ficaria assim:

names = ["Jimmy", "Timmy", "Kenny", "Lenny"]

#pass a string(iterable) to .extend()
names.extend("Dylan")

print(names)

#output
#['Jimmy', 'Timmy', 'Kenny', 'Lenny', 'D', 'y', 'l', 'a', 'n']

Conclusão

Resumindo, o .append()método é usado para adicionar um item ao final de uma lista existente, sem criar uma nova lista.

Quando é usado para adicionar uma lista a outra lista, cria uma lista dentro de uma lista.

Se você quiser saber mais sobre Python, confira a Certificação Python do freeCodeCamp . Você começará a aprender de maneira interativa e amigável para iniciantes. Você também construirá cinco projetos no final para colocar em prática o que aprendeu.


fonte: https://www.freecodecamp.org

#python