The Complete Beginner’s Guide to Machine Learning: Multiple Linear Regression in 4 Lines of Code!

Conquer the basics of multiple linear regression (and backward elimination!) and use your data to predict the future!

Being able to predict the future is awesome.

You might want to predict how well a stock will do based on some other information that you just happen to have.

It might help you to know if how often you bathe and how many cats you have relates to how long you’ll live.

You might want to figure out if there’s a relationship between a man who 1.) calls his mom more than three times a day, 2.) refers to another man as “bro,” 3.) has never done his own laundry and above average divorce rates.

Multiple linear regression might be for you!


GIF via GIPHY

Multiple linear regression is fun because it looks at the relationships within a bunch of information. Instead of just looking at how one thing relates to another thing (simple linear regression), you can look at the relationship between a lot of different things and the thing you want to predict.

linear regression model is a statistical model that’s frequently used in data science. It’s also one of the basic building blocks of machine learning! Multiple linear regression (MLR/multiple regression) is a statistical technique. It can use several variables to predict the outcome of a different variable. The goal of multiple regression is to model the linear relationship between your independent variables and your dependent variable. It looks at how multiple independent variables are related to a dependent variable.

I’m going to assume that you know a little bit about simple linear regression. If you don’t, check out this article on building a simple linear regressor. It will give you a quick (and fun) walk-through of the basics.

The complete beginner’s guide to machine learning: simple linear regression in four lines of code!


A clear and comprehensive blueprint for absolutely anyone who wants to build a simple machine learning model

towardsdatascience.com

Simple linear regression is what you can use when you have one independent variable and one dependent variable. Multiple linear regression is what you can use when you have a bunch of different independent variables!

Multiple regression analysis has three main uses.

  • You can look at the strength of the effect of the independent variables on the dependent variable.
  • You can use it to ask how much the dependent variable will change if the independent variables are changed.
  • You can also use it to predict trends and future values.

Let’s do that one!

Image by RondellMelling via Pixabay

We’re going to keep things super simple here so that multiple linear regression as a whole makes sense. I do want you to know that things can get a lot more complex than this in the real world.

How do I begin?

For the purposes of this post, you are now working for a venture capitalist.


Congratulations!


GIF via GIPHY

So here’s the thing: you have a dataset in front of you with information on 50 companies. You have five columns that contain information about how much those companies spend on admin, research and development (R&D), and marketing, their location by state, and their profit for the most recent year. This dataset is anonymized, which means we don’t know the names of these companies or any other identifying information.

You’ve been hired to analyze this information and create a model. You need to inform the guy who hired you what kind of companies will make the most sense in the future to invest in. To keep things simple, let’s say that your employer wants to make this decision based on last year’s profit. This means that the profits column is your dependent variable. The other columns are the independent variables.

So you want to learn about the dependent variable (profit) based on the other categories of information you have.

The guy who hired you doesn’t want to invest in these specific companies. He wants to use the information in this dataset as a sample. This sample will help him understand which of the companies he looks at in the future will perform better based on the same information.

Does he want to invest in companies that spend a lot on R&D? Marketing? Does he want to invest in companies that are based in Illinois? You need to help him create a set of guidelines. You’re going to help him be able to say something along the lines of, “I’m interested in a company that’s based in New York that spends very little on admin expenses but a lot on R&D.”

You’re going to come up with a model that will allow him to assess where and into which companies he wants to invest to maximize his profit.


GIF via GIPHY

Linear regression is great for correlation, but remember that correlation and causation are not the same things! You are not saying that one thing causes the other, you’re finding which independent variables are strongly correlated to the dependent variable.

There are some assumptions that absolutely have to be true:

  • There is a linear relationship between the dependent variable and the independent variables.
  • The independent variables aren’t too highly correlated with each other.
  • Your observations for the dependent variable are selected independently and at random.
  • Regression residuals are normally distributed.

You need to check that these assumptions are true before you proceed and build your model. We’re totally skipping past that here. Make sure that if you’re doing this in the real world, you aren’t just blindly following this tutorial. Those assumptions need to be correct when you’re building your regression!

Dummy variables

If you aren’t familiar with the concept of dummy variables, check out this article on data cleaning and preprocessing. It has some simple code that we can go ahead and copy and paste here.


The complete beginner’s guide to data cleaning and preprocessing


How to successfully prepare your data for a machine learning model in minutes

towardsdatascience.com

So we’ve already decided that “profit” is our dependent variable (y) and the others are our independent variables (X). We’ve also decided that what we want is a linear regression model. What about that column of states? “State” is a categorical variable, not a numerical variable. We need our independent variables to be numbers, not words. What do we do?

Photo by 3dman_eu via Pixabay

Let’s create a dummy variable!

If you looked at the information in the locations column, you might see that all of the companies that are being examined are based in two states. For the purposes of this explanation, let’s say all of our companies are located in either New York or Minnesota. That means that we’ll want to turn this one column of information into two columns of 1s and 0s. (If you want to learn more about why we’re doing that, check out that article on simple linear regression. It explains why this would be the best way to arrange our data.)


So how do we populate those columns? Basically, we’ll turn each state into its own column. If a company is located in New York, it will have a 1 in the “New York” column and a 0 in the “Minnesota” column. If you were using more states, you’d have a 1 in the New York column, and, for example, a 0 in the “California” column, a zero in the “Illinois” column, a 0 in the Arkansas column, and so on. We won’t be using the original “locations” column anymore because we won’t need it!

These 1s and 0s are basically working as a light switch. 1 is “on” or “yes” and 0 is “off” or “nope.”

Beware the dummy variable trap

You never want to include both variables at the same time.


Why is that?

You’d be duplicating a variable. The first variable (d1) is always equal to 1 minus the second variable (d2). (d1 = 1-d2) When one variable predicts another, it’s called multicollinearity. As a result, the model wouldn’t be able to distinguish the results of d1 from the results of d2. You can’t have the constant and both dummy variables at the same time. If you have nine variables, include eight of them. (If you have two sets of dummy variables, then you have to do this for each set.)

What is the P-value?

You’re going to want to be familiar with the concept of a P-value. That’s definitely going to come up.


The P-value is the probability of getting a sample like ours (or more extreme than ours) if the null hypothesis is true.

It gives a value to the weirdness of your sample. If you have a large P-value, then you probably won’t change your mind about the null hypothesis. A large value means that it wouldn’t be at all surprising to get a sample like yours if the hypothesis is true. As the P-value gets smaller, you should probably start to ask yourself some questions. You might want to change your mind and maybe even reject the hypothesis.

The null hypothesis is the official way to refer to the claim (hypothesis) that’s on trial here. It’s the default position where there’s just no association among the groups that are being tested. In every experiment, you’re looking for an effect among the groups that are being tested. Unfortunately, there’s always the possibility that there’s no effect (or no difference) between the groups. That lack of difference is called the null hypothesis.
It’s like if you were doing a trial of a drug that doesn’t work. In that trial, there just wouldn’t be a difference between the group that took the drug and the rest of the population. The difference would be null.
You always assume that the null hypothesis is true until you have evidence that it isn’t.

Let’s keep moving!

We need to figure out which columns we want to keep and which we want to toss. If you just chuck a bunch of stuff into your model, it won’t be a good one. It definitely won’t be reliable! (Also, at the end of the day, you need to be able to explain your model to the guy who hired you to create this thing. You’re only going to want to explain the variables that actually predict something!)


There are essentially five methods of building a multiple linear regression model.

  1. Chuck Everything In and Hope for the Best
  2. Backward Elimination
  3. Forward Selection
  4. Bidirectional Elimination
  5. Score Comparison

You’ll almost certainly hear about Stepwise Regression as well. Stepwise regression is most commonly used as another way of saying bidirectional elimination (method 4). Sometimes when people use that phrase they’re referring to a combination of methods 2, 3, and 4. (That’s the idea behind bidirectional elimination as well.)

Method 1 (Chuck Everything In): Okay. That isn’t the official name for this method (but it should be). Occasionally you’ll need to build a model where you just throw in all your variables. You might have some kind of prior knowledge. You might have a particular framework you need to use. You might have been hired by someone who’s insisting that you do that. You might want to prepare for backward elimination. It’s a real option, so I’m including it here.

Method 2 (backward elimination): This has a few basic steps.

  1. First, you’ll need to set a significance level for which data will stay in the model. For example, you might want to set a significance level of 5% (SL = 0.05). This is important and can have real ramifications, so give it some thought.
  2. Next, you’ll fit the full model with all possible predictors.
  3. You’ll consider the predictor with the highest P-value. If your P-value is greater than your significance level, you’ll move to step four, otherwise, you’re done!
  4. Remove that predictor with the highest P-value.
  5. Fit the model without that predictor variable. If you just remove the variable, you need to refit and rebuild the model. The coefficients and constants will be different. When you remove one, it affects the others.
  6. Go back to step 3, do it all over, and keep doing that until you come to a point where even the highest P-value is < SL. Now your model is ready. All of the variables that are left are less than the significance level.

(After we go through these concepts, I’ll walk you through an example of backward elimination so you can see it in action! It’s definitely confusing, but if you really look at what’s going on, you’ll get the hang of it.)

Method 3 (forward selection): This is way more complex than just reversing backward elimination.

  1. Choose your significance level (SL = 0.05).
  2. Fit all possible simple regression models and select the one with the lowest P-value.
  3. Keep this variable and fit all possible models with one extra predictor added to the one you already have. If we selected a simple linear regressor with one variable, now we’d select all of them with two variables. That means all possible two variable linear regressions.
  4. Find the predictor with the lowest P-value. If P < Sl, go back to step 3. Otherwise, you’re done!

We can stop when P<SL is no longer true, or there are no more P-values that are less than the significance level. It means that the variable is not significant anymore. You won’t keep the current model, though. You’ll keep the previous one because, in the final model, your variable is insignificant.

Method 3 (bidirectional elimination): This method combines the previous two!

  1. Select a significance level to enter and a significance level to stay (SLENTER = 0.05, SLSTAY = 0.05).
  2. Perform the next step of forward selection where you add the new variable. You need to have your P-value be less than SLENTER.
  3. Now perform all of the steps of backward elimination. The variables must have a P-value less than SLSTAY in order to stay.
  4. Now head back to step two, then move forward to step 3, and so on until no new variables can enter and no new variables can exit.

You’re done!

Method 4 (score comparison): Here, you’re going to be looking at all possible methods. You’ll look at a comparison of the scores for all of the possible methods. This is definitely the most resource-consuming approach!

  1. Select a criterion of goodness of fit (for example, Akaike criterion)
  2. Construct all possible regression models
  3. Select the one with the best criterion

Fun fact: if you have 10 columns of data, you’ll wind up with 1,023 models here. You’d better be ready to commit if you’re going to go this route!

Ummm, what?

If you’re just getting started with machine learning, statistics, or data science, that all looks like it will be an insane amount of code. It’s not!


So much of what you need to do with a machine learning model is all ready to go with the amazing libraries out there. You’ll need to do the tough parts where you decide what information is important and what kind of models you’ll want to use. It’s also up to you to interpret the results and be able to communicate what you’ve built. However, the code itself is very doable.


GIF via GIPHY

Let me show you!

Backward elimination is the fastest and the best method to start with, so that’s what I’m going to walk you through after we build the quick and easy multiple linear regression model.


First, let’s prepare our dataset. Let’s say we have a .csv file called “startups.csv” that contains the information we talked about earlier. We’ll say it has 50 companies and columns for R&D spending, admin spending, marketing spending, what state the company is located in (let’s say, New York, Minnesota, and California), and one column for last year’s profit.

It’s a good idea to import your libraries right away.

# Importing the libraries
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import pandas as pd

Now we can go ahead and copy and paste the code from that data cleaning and preparation article! We’re definitely going to want to change the name of our dataset to ours. I’m calling it ‘startups.csv.’ We’ll adjust a couple of other tiny details as well. Profit (y) is still our last column, so we’ll continue to remove that with [:, :-1]. We’ll make a little adjustment to grab our independent variables with [:, 4]. Now we have a vector of the dependent variable (y) and a matrix of independent variables that contains everything except the profits (X). We want to see if there is a linear dependency between the two!

dataset = pd.read_csv('startups.csv')
X = dataset.iloc[:, :-1].values
y = dataset.iloc[:, 4].values

Now we need to encode the categorical variable. We can use label encoder and one hot encoder to create dummy variables. (We can copy and paste this from that other article too! Make sure you’re grabbing the right information and you don’t encode the dependent variable.) You’re going to change the index of the column in both spots [:, 3] and [:, 3] again, and replace the index in one hot encoder too [3].

from sklearn.preprocessing import LabelEncoder, OneHotEncoder
labelencoder = LabelEncoder()
X[:, 3] = labelencoder.fit_transform(X[:, 3])
onehotencoder = OneHotEncoder(categorical_features = [3])
X = onehotencoder.fit_transform(X).toarray()

You’re ready to go! Our one column of information is now three columns, each of which corresponds to one state!

What about avoiding the dummy variable trap? You don’t actually need to do that with our libraries! It’s all taken care of for you here with the libraries that we’re choosing to use. However, if you ever want or need to run that code, it’s simple! You can do that with one line right after you encode your data.

X=X[:, 1:]

What does that do? It removes the first column from X. Putting the 1 there means that we want to take all of the columns starting at index 1 to the end. You won’t take the first column. For some libraries, you’ll need to take one column away manually to be sure your dataset won’t contain redundancies.

Now let’s split our training and testing data. The most common split is an 80/20 split, which means 80% of our data would go to training our model and 20% would go to testing it. Let’s do that here!

from sklearn.model_selection import train_test_split
X_train, X_test, y_train, y_test = train_test_split(X, y, test_size = 0.2, random_state = 0)

What about feature scaling?

We don’t need to do feature scaling here! The library will take care of that for us.


Photo by Gift Habeshaw on Unsplash

Multiple linear regression time!

We’ll import linear regression from Scikit-Learn. (That makes a little sense, doesn’t it?)


from sklearn.linear_model import LinearRegression

Now we’ll introduce our regressor. We’ll create an object of the class LinearRegression and we’ll fit the object to our training set. We want to apply this to both our X_train and y_train.

regressor = LinearRegression()
regressor.fit(X_train, y_train)

Now let’s test the performance of our multiple linear regressor!

(We won’t plot a graph here because we’d need five dimensions to do that. If you’re interested in plotting a graph with a simple linear regressor, check out this article on building a simple linear regressor.)

We’ll create the vector of predictions (y_pred). We can use the regressor with the predict method to predict the observations of the test set (X_test).

y_pred = regressor.predict(X_test)

That’s it! Four lines of code and you’ve built a multiple linear regressor!


GIF via GIPHY

Now we can see the ten predicted profits! You can print them any time with a simple print(y_pred). We can easily compare them by taking a look at the predictions and then comparing them to the actual results. If you were to take a look, you’d see that some are incredibly accurate and the rest are pretty darn good. Nice work!

There is definitely some linear dependency between our dependent and independent variables. We can clearly see a strong linear relationship between the two.

Congratulations!! You now know how to make a multiple linear regressor in Python!

Want to keep going?

Things are about to get more challenging!


What if some of the variables have a lot of impact on our dependent variable and some are statistically insignificant? We can definitely find out which are the variables that have the highest impact on the dependent variable. We’ll want to find a team of variables that all have a definite effect, positive or negative.

Let’s use backward elimination!

We need to prepare something specific for backward elimination. We want a library stats model, so let’s import statsmodels.formula.api. That’s a little long to have to keep retyping, so we’ll make a shortcut using sm.

import statsmodels.formula.api as sm

We need to add a column of ones in our matrix of features of independent variables because of the way it works with the constant. (Our model needs to take into account our constant b0. In most libraries it’s included, but not in the stats model that we’re using. We’ll add a column of ones so our stats model will understand the formula correctly.)

This starts pretty simply. We’ll use .append because we want to append.

(Love Python ❤️)

We have our matrix of features X. The values argument is perfect for us because it’s an array. We’ll input a matrix of 50 lines and one column with 1s inside. We can create that with Numpy’s np.ones. We’ll need to specify the numbers of lines and columns we want (50,1). We need to convert the array into the integer type to make this work, so we’ll use .astype(int). Then we need to decide if we’re adding a line or a column (line = 0, column = 1), so we’ll say axis = 1 for a column!

We want this column to be located at the beginning of our dataset. What do we do? Let’s add matrix X to the column of 50 ones, rather than the other way around. We can do that with values = X.

X = np.append(arr = np.ones((50, 1)).astype(int), values = X, axis = 1)

Let’s do this!

We want to create a new matrix of our optimal features (X_opt). These features are the ones that are statistically significant. The ones that have a high impact on the profit. This will be the matrix containing the team of optimal features with high impact on the profit.


We’ll need to initialize it. We can remove the variables that are not statistically significant one by one. We’ll do this by removing the index at each step. First take all the indexes of the columns in X, separated by commas [0,1,2,3,4,5].

If you look back at the methods earlier, you’ll see that we first need to select our significance level, which we talked about earlier. Then we need to fit the model!

We aren’t going to take the regressor we built. We’re using a new library, so now we need a new fit to our future optimal matrix. We’ll create a new regressor (our last one was from the linear regression library). Our new class will be ordinary least squares (OLS). We’ll need to call the class and specify some arguments. (You can check out the official documentation here.) For our arguments, we’ll need an endog (our dependent variable) and an exog (our X_opt, which is just our matrix of features (X) with the intercept, which isn’t included by default). In order to fit it we’ll just use a .fit()!

X_opt = X[:, [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5]]
regressor_OLS = sm.OLS(endog = y, exog = X_opt).fit()

Now we’ve initialized X_opt!

Now let’s look at our P-values! How do we look for the predictor with the highest P-values? We’ll take our regressor object and call the function .summary().

regressor_OLS.summary()

Now we can see a table with some very useful information about our model! We can see the adjusted R-squared values and our P-values. The lower the p-value, the more significant your independent variable will be with respect to your dependent variable. Here, we’re looking for the highest one. That’s easy to see.

Now let’s remove it!

We can copy and paste our code from above and remove index 2. That will look like this:

X_opt = X[:, [0, 1, 3, 4, 5]]
regressor_OLS = sm.OLS(endog = y, exog = X_opt).fit()
regressor_OLS.summary()

Just keep going until you don’t have any P-values that are higher than the SL value you chose. Remember that you always want to look at the original matrix in order to choose the correct index! You’re using the columns in your original matrix (X), not in X_opt.

You might get to the point where you have a P-value that’s incredibly close to the SL value that you chose. For example, we chose 0.050 and here’s 0.060.

That’s a tough situation because the value that you chose could have been anything. If you want to thoroughly follow your framework, you’ll need to remove that index. But there are other metrics that can help make more sense of whether or not we want to do that. We could add other metrics, like a criterion, that can help us decide if we really want to make that choice. There’s also a lot of information right in the summary here, like the R-squared value, that can help us make our decision.

So let’s say we ran backward elimination until the end and we’re left with only the index for the R&D spending column.

X_opt = X[:, [0, 1, 3, 4, 5]]
regressor_OLS = sm.OLS(endog = y, exog = X_opt).fit()
regressor_OLS.summary()
X_opt = X[:, [0, 1, 3, 5]]
regressor_OLS = sm.OLS(endog = y, exog = X_opt).fit()
regressor_OLS.summary()
X_opt = X[:, [0, 3, 5]]
regressor_OLS = sm.OLS(endog = y, exog = X_opt).fit()
regressor_OLS.summary()
X_opt = X[:, [0, 3]]
regressor_OLS = sm.OLS(endog = y, exog = X_opt).fit()
regressor_OLS.summary()

If we’ve been following our model carefully, that means that we now know that R&D spending is a powerful predictor for our dependent variable! The conclusion here is that the data that can predict profits with the highest impact is composed of only one category: R&D spending!

You did it! You used multiple linear regression and backward elimination! You figured out that looking at R&D spending will give you the best sense of what a company’s profits will be!

You’re amazing!

Thanks for reading ❤

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Buddha Community

Plpgsql Check: Extension That Allows to Check Plpgsql Source Code.

plpgsql_check

I founded this project, because I wanted to publish the code I wrote in the last two years, when I tried to write enhanced checking for PostgreSQL upstream. It was not fully successful - integration into upstream requires some larger plpgsql refactoring - probably it will not be done in next years (now is Dec 2013). But written code is fully functional and can be used in production (and it is used in production). So, I created this extension to be available for all plpgsql developers.

If you like it and if you would to join to development of this extension, register yourself to postgresql extension hacking google group.

Features

  • check fields of referenced database objects and types inside embedded SQL
  • using correct types of function parameters
  • unused variables and function argumens, unmodified OUT argumens
  • partially detection of dead code (due RETURN command)
  • detection of missing RETURN command in function
  • try to identify unwanted hidden casts, that can be performance issue like unused indexes
  • possibility to collect relations and functions used by function
  • possibility to check EXECUTE stmt agaist SQL injection vulnerability

I invite any ideas, patches, bugreports.

plpgsql_check is next generation of plpgsql_lint. It allows to check source code by explicit call plpgsql_check_function.

PostgreSQL PostgreSQL 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14 are supported.

The SQL statements inside PL/pgSQL functions are checked by validator for semantic errors. These errors can be found by plpgsql_check_function:

Active mode

postgres=# CREATE EXTENSION plpgsql_check;
LOAD
postgres=# CREATE TABLE t1(a int, b int);
CREATE TABLE

postgres=#
CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION public.f1()
RETURNS void
LANGUAGE plpgsql
AS $function$
DECLARE r record;
BEGIN
  FOR r IN SELECT * FROM t1
  LOOP
    RAISE NOTICE '%', r.c; -- there is bug - table t1 missing "c" column
  END LOOP;
END;
$function$;

CREATE FUNCTION

postgres=# select f1(); -- execution doesn't find a bug due to empty table t1
  f1 
 ────
   
 (1 row)

postgres=# \x
Expanded display is on.
postgres=# select * from plpgsql_check_function_tb('f1()');
─[ RECORD 1 ]───────────────────────────
functionid │ f1
lineno     │ 6
statement  │ RAISE
sqlstate   │ 42703
message    │ record "r" has no field "c"
detail     │ [null]
hint       │ [null]
level      │ error
position   │ 0
query      │ [null]

postgres=# \sf+ f1
    CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION public.f1()
     RETURNS void
     LANGUAGE plpgsql
1       AS $function$
2       DECLARE r record;
3       BEGIN
4         FOR r IN SELECT * FROM t1
5         LOOP
6           RAISE NOTICE '%', r.c; -- there is bug - table t1 missing "c" column
7         END LOOP;
8       END;
9       $function$

Function plpgsql_check_function() has three possible formats: text, json or xml

select * from plpgsql_check_function('f1()', fatal_errors := false);
                         plpgsql_check_function                         
------------------------------------------------------------------------
 error:42703:4:SQL statement:column "c" of relation "t1" does not exist
 Query: update t1 set c = 30
 --                   ^
 error:42P01:7:RAISE:missing FROM-clause entry for table "r"
 Query: SELECT r.c
 --            ^
 error:42601:7:RAISE:too few parameters specified for RAISE
(7 rows)

postgres=# select * from plpgsql_check_function('fx()', format:='xml');
                 plpgsql_check_function                     
────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────
 <Function oid="16400">                                        ↵
   <Issue>                                                     ↵
     <Level>error</level>                                      ↵
     <Sqlstate>42P01</Sqlstate>                                ↵
     <Message>relation "foo111" does not exist</Message>       ↵
     <Stmt lineno="3">RETURN</Stmt>                            ↵
     <Query position="23">SELECT (select a from foo111)</Query>↵
   </Issue>                                                    ↵
  </Function>
 (1 row)

Arguments

You can set level of warnings via function's parameters:

Mandatory arguments

  • function name or function signature - these functions requires function specification. Any function in PostgreSQL can be specified by Oid or by name or by signature. When you know oid or complete function's signature, you can use a regprocedure type parameter like 'fx()'::regprocedure or 16799::regprocedure. Possible alternative is using a name only, when function's name is unique - like 'fx'. When the name is not unique or the function doesn't exists it raises a error.

Optional arguments

relid DEFAULT 0 - oid of relation assigned with trigger function. It is necessary for check of any trigger function.

fatal_errors boolean DEFAULT true - stop on first error

other_warnings boolean DEFAULT true - show warnings like different attributes number in assignmenet on left and right side, variable overlaps function's parameter, unused variables, unwanted casting, ..

extra_warnings boolean DEFAULT true - show warnings like missing RETURN, shadowed variables, dead code, never read (unused) function's parameter, unmodified variables, modified auto variables, ..

performance_warnings boolean DEFAULT false - performance related warnings like declared type with type modificator, casting, implicit casts in where clause (can be reason why index is not used), ..

security_warnings boolean DEFAULT false - security related checks like SQL injection vulnerability detection

anyelementtype regtype DEFAULT 'int' - a real type used instead anyelement type

anyenumtype regtype DEFAULT '-' - a real type used instead anyenum type

anyrangetype regtype DEFAULT 'int4range' - a real type used instead anyrange type

anycompatibletype DEFAULT 'int' - a real type used instead anycompatible type

anycompatiblerangetype DEFAULT 'int4range' - a real type used instead anycompatible range type

without_warnings DEFAULT false - disable all warnings

all_warnings DEFAULT false - enable all warnings

newtable DEFAULT NULL, oldtable DEFAULT NULL - the names of NEW or OLD transitive tables. These parameters are required when transitive tables are used.

Triggers

When you want to check any trigger, you have to enter a relation that will be used together with trigger function

CREATE TABLE bar(a int, b int);

postgres=# \sf+ foo_trg
    CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION public.foo_trg()
         RETURNS trigger
         LANGUAGE plpgsql
1       AS $function$
2       BEGIN
3         NEW.c := NEW.a + NEW.b;
4         RETURN NEW;
5       END;
6       $function$

Missing relation specification

postgres=# select * from plpgsql_check_function('foo_trg()');
ERROR:  missing trigger relation
HINT:  Trigger relation oid must be valid

Correct trigger checking (with specified relation)

postgres=# select * from plpgsql_check_function('foo_trg()', 'bar');
                 plpgsql_check_function                 
--------------------------------------------------------
 error:42703:3:assignment:record "new" has no field "c"
(1 row)

For triggers with transitive tables you can set a oldtable or newtable parameters:

create or replace function footab_trig_func()
returns trigger as $$
declare x int;
begin
  if false then
    -- should be ok;
    select count(*) from newtab into x; 

    -- should fail;
    select count(*) from newtab where d = 10 into x;
  end if;
  return null;
end;
$$ language plpgsql;

select * from plpgsql_check_function('footab_trig_func','footab', newtable := 'newtab');

Mass check

You can use the plpgsql_check_function for mass check functions and mass check triggers. Please, test following queries:

-- check all nontrigger plpgsql functions
SELECT p.oid, p.proname, plpgsql_check_function(p.oid)
   FROM pg_catalog.pg_namespace n
   JOIN pg_catalog.pg_proc p ON pronamespace = n.oid
   JOIN pg_catalog.pg_language l ON p.prolang = l.oid
  WHERE l.lanname = 'plpgsql' AND p.prorettype <> 2279;

or

SELECT p.proname, tgrelid::regclass, cf.*
   FROM pg_proc p
        JOIN pg_trigger t ON t.tgfoid = p.oid 
        JOIN pg_language l ON p.prolang = l.oid
        JOIN pg_namespace n ON p.pronamespace = n.oid,
        LATERAL plpgsql_check_function(p.oid, t.tgrelid) cf
  WHERE n.nspname = 'public' and l.lanname = 'plpgsql'

or

-- check all plpgsql functions (functions or trigger functions with defined triggers)
SELECT
    (pcf).functionid::regprocedure, (pcf).lineno, (pcf).statement,
    (pcf).sqlstate, (pcf).message, (pcf).detail, (pcf).hint, (pcf).level,
    (pcf)."position", (pcf).query, (pcf).context
FROM
(
    SELECT
        plpgsql_check_function_tb(pg_proc.oid, COALESCE(pg_trigger.tgrelid, 0)) AS pcf
    FROM pg_proc
    LEFT JOIN pg_trigger
        ON (pg_trigger.tgfoid = pg_proc.oid)
    WHERE
        prolang = (SELECT lang.oid FROM pg_language lang WHERE lang.lanname = 'plpgsql') AND
        pronamespace <> (SELECT nsp.oid FROM pg_namespace nsp WHERE nsp.nspname = 'pg_catalog') AND
        -- ignore unused triggers
        (pg_proc.prorettype <> (SELECT typ.oid FROM pg_type typ WHERE typ.typname = 'trigger') OR
         pg_trigger.tgfoid IS NOT NULL)
    OFFSET 0
) ss
ORDER BY (pcf).functionid::regprocedure::text, (pcf).lineno

Passive mode

Functions should be checked on start - plpgsql_check module must be loaded.

Configuration

plpgsql_check.mode = [ disabled | by_function | fresh_start | every_start ]
plpgsql_check.fatal_errors = [ yes | no ]

plpgsql_check.show_nonperformance_warnings = false
plpgsql_check.show_performance_warnings = false

Default mode is by_function, that means that the enhanced check is done only in active mode - by plpgsql_check_function. fresh_start means cold start.

You can enable passive mode by

load 'plpgsql'; -- 1.1 and higher doesn't need it
load 'plpgsql_check';
set plpgsql_check.mode = 'every_start';

SELECT fx(10); -- run functions - function is checked before runtime starts it

Limits

plpgsql_check should find almost all errors on really static code. When developer use some PLpgSQL's dynamic features like dynamic SQL or record data type, then false positives are possible. These should be rare - in well written code - and then the affected function should be redesigned or plpgsql_check should be disabled for this function.

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION f1()
RETURNS void AS $$
DECLARE r record;
BEGIN
  FOR r IN EXECUTE 'SELECT * FROM t1'
  LOOP
    RAISE NOTICE '%', r.c;
  END LOOP;
END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql SET plpgsql.enable_check TO false;

A usage of plpgsql_check adds a small overhead (in enabled passive mode) and you should use it only in develop or preprod environments.

Dynamic SQL

This module doesn't check queries that are assembled in runtime. It is not possible to identify results of dynamic queries - so plpgsql_check cannot to set correct type to record variables and cannot to check a dependent SQLs and expressions.

When type of record's variable is not know, you can assign it explicitly with pragma type:

DECLARE r record;
BEGIN
  EXECUTE format('SELECT * FROM %I', _tablename) INTO r;
  PERFORM plpgsql_check_pragma('type: r (id int, processed bool)');
  IF NOT r.processed THEN
    ...

Attention: The SQL injection check can detect only some SQL injection vulnerabilities. This tool cannot be used for security audit! Some issues should not be detected. This check can raise false alarms too - probably when variable is sanitized by other command or when value is of some compose type. 

Refcursors

plpgsql_check should not to detect structure of referenced cursors. A reference on cursor in PLpgSQL is implemented as name of global cursor. In check time, the name is not known (not in all possibilities), and global cursor doesn't exist. It is significant break for any static analyse. PLpgSQL cannot to set correct type for record variables and cannot to check a dependent SQLs and expressions. A solution is same like dynamic SQL. Don't use record variable as target when you use refcursor type or disable plpgsql_check for these functions.

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION foo(refcur_var refcursor)
RETURNS void AS $$
DECLARE
  rec_var record;
BEGIN
  FETCH refcur_var INTO rec_var; -- this is STOP for plpgsql_check
  RAISE NOTICE '%', rec_var;     -- record rec_var is not assigned yet error

In this case a record type should not be used (use known rowtype instead):

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION foo(refcur_var refcursor)
RETURNS void AS $$
DECLARE
  rec_var some_rowtype;
BEGIN
  FETCH refcur_var INTO rec_var;
  RAISE NOTICE '%', rec_var;

Temporary tables

plpgsql_check cannot verify queries over temporary tables that are created in plpgsql's function runtime. For this use case it is necessary to create a fake temp table or disable plpgsql_check for this function.

In reality temp tables are stored in own (per user) schema with higher priority than persistent tables. So you can do (with following trick safetly):

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION public.disable_dml()
RETURNS trigger
LANGUAGE plpgsql AS $function$
BEGIN
  RAISE EXCEPTION SQLSTATE '42P01'
     USING message = format('this instance of %I table doesn''t allow any DML operation', TG_TABLE_NAME),
           hint = format('you should to run "CREATE TEMP TABLE %1$I(LIKE %1$I INCLUDING ALL);" statement',
                         TG_TABLE_NAME);
  RETURN NULL;
END;
$function$;

CREATE TABLE foo(a int, b int); -- doesn't hold data ever
CREATE TRIGGER foo_disable_dml
   BEFORE INSERT OR UPDATE OR DELETE ON foo
   EXECUTE PROCEDURE disable_dml();

postgres=# INSERT INTO  foo VALUES(10,20);
ERROR:  this instance of foo table doesn't allow any DML operation
HINT:  you should to run "CREATE TEMP TABLE foo(LIKE foo INCLUDING ALL);" statement
postgres=# 

CREATE TABLE
postgres=# INSERT INTO  foo VALUES(10,20);
INSERT 0 1

This trick emulates GLOBAL TEMP tables partially and it allows a statical validation. Other possibility is using a [template foreign data wrapper] (https://github.com/okbob/template_fdw)

You can use pragma table and create ephemeral table:

BEGIN
   CREATE TEMP TABLE xxx(a int);
   PERFORM plpgsql_check_pragma('table: xxx(a int)');
   INSERT INTO xxx VALUES(10);

Dependency list

A function plpgsql_show_dependency_tb can show all functions, operators and relations used inside processed function:

postgres=# select * from plpgsql_show_dependency_tb('testfunc(int,float)');
┌──────────┬───────┬────────┬─────────┬────────────────────────────┐
│   type   │  oid  │ schema │  name   │           params           │
╞══════════╪═══════╪════════╪═════════╪════════════════════════════╡
│ FUNCTION │ 36008 │ public │ myfunc1 │ (integer,double precision) │
│ FUNCTION │ 35999 │ public │ myfunc2 │ (integer,double precision) │
│ OPERATOR │ 36007 │ public │ **      │ (integer,integer)          │
│ RELATION │ 36005 │ public │ myview  │                            │
│ RELATION │ 36002 │ public │ mytable │                            │
└──────────┴───────┴────────┴─────────┴────────────────────────────┘
(4 rows)

Profiler

The plpgsql_check contains simple profiler of plpgsql functions and procedures. It can work with/without a access to shared memory. It depends on shared_preload_libraries config. When plpgsql_check was initialized by shared_preload_libraries, then it can allocate shared memory, and function's profiles are stored there. When plpgsql_check cannot to allocate shared momory, the profile is stored in session memory.

Due dependencies, shared_preload_libraries should to contains plpgsql first

postgres=# show shared_preload_libraries ;
┌──────────────────────────┐
│ shared_preload_libraries │
╞══════════════════════════╡
│ plpgsql,plpgsql_check    │
└──────────────────────────┘
(1 row)

The profiler is active when GUC plpgsql_check.profiler is on. The profiler doesn't require shared memory, but if there are not shared memory, then the profile is limmitted just to active session.

When plpgsql_check is initialized by shared_preload_libraries, another GUC is available to configure the amount of shared memory used by the profiler: plpgsql_check.profiler_max_shared_chunks. This defines the maximum number of statements chunk that can be stored in shared memory. For each plpgsql function (or procedure), the whole content is split into chunks of 30 statements. If needed, multiple chunks can be used to store the whole content of a single function. A single chunk is 1704 bytes. The default value for this GUC is 15000, which should be enough for big projects containing hundred of thousands of statements in plpgsql, and will consume about 24MB of memory. If your project doesn't require that much number of chunks, you can set this parameter to a smaller number in order to decrease the memory usage. The minimum value is 50 (which should consume about 83kB of memory), and the maximum value is 100000 (which should consume about 163MB of memory). Changing this parameter requires a PostgreSQL restart.

The profiler will also retrieve the query identifier for each instruction that contains an expression or optimizable statement. Note that this requires pg_stat_statements, or another similar third-party extension), to be installed. There are some limitations to the query identifier retrieval:

  • if a plpgsql expression contains underlying statements, only the top level query identifier will be retrieved
  • the profiler doesn't compute query identifier by itself but relies on external extension, such as pg_stat_statements, for that. It means that depending on the external extension behavior, you may not be able to see a query identifier for some statements. That's for instance the case with DDL statements, as pg_stat_statements doesn't expose the query identifier for such queries.
  • a query identifier is retrieved only for instructions containing expressions. This means that plpgsql_profiler_function_tb() function can report less query identifier than instructions on a single line.

Attention: A update of shared profiles can decrease performance on servers under higher load.

The profile can be displayed by function plpgsql_profiler_function_tb:

postgres=# select lineno, avg_time, source from plpgsql_profiler_function_tb('fx(int)');
┌────────┬──────────┬───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┐
│ lineno │ avg_time │                              source                               │
╞════════╪══════════╪═══════════════════════════════════════════════════════════════════╡
│      1 │          │                                                                   │
│      2 │          │ declare result int = 0;                                           │
│      3 │    0.075 │ begin                                                             │
│      4 │    0.202 │   for i in 1..$1 loop                                             │
│      5 │    0.005 │     select result + i into result; select result + i into result; │
│      6 │          │   end loop;                                                       │
│      7 │        0 │   return result;                                                  │
│      8 │          │ end;                                                              │
└────────┴──────────┴───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┘
(9 rows)

The profile per statements (not per line) can be displayed by function plpgsql_profiler_function_statements_tb:

        CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION public.fx1(a integer)
         RETURNS integer
         LANGUAGE plpgsql
1       AS $function$
2       begin
3         if a > 10 then
4           raise notice 'ahoj';
5           return -1;
6         else
7           raise notice 'nazdar';
8           return 1;
9         end if;
10      end;
11      $function$

postgres=# select stmtid, parent_stmtid, parent_note, lineno, exec_stmts, stmtname
             from plpgsql_profiler_function_statements_tb('fx1');
┌────────┬───────────────┬─────────────┬────────┬────────────┬─────────────────┐
│ stmtid │ parent_stmtid │ parent_note │ lineno │ exec_stmts │    stmtname     │
╞════════╪═══════════════╪═════════════╪════════╪════════════╪═════════════════╡
│      0 │             ∅ │ ∅           │      2 │          0 │ statement block │
│      1 │             0 │ body        │      3 │          0 │ IF              │
│      2 │             1 │ then body   │      4 │          0 │ RAISE           │
│      3 │             1 │ then body   │      5 │          0 │ RETURN          │
│      4 │             1 │ else body   │      7 │          0 │ RAISE           │
│      5 │             1 │ else body   │      8 │          0 │ RETURN          │
└────────┴───────────────┴─────────────┴────────┴────────────┴─────────────────┘
(6 rows)

All stored profiles can be displayed by calling function plpgsql_profiler_functions_all:

postgres=# select * from plpgsql_profiler_functions_all();
┌───────────────────────┬────────────┬────────────┬──────────┬─────────────┬──────────┬──────────┐
│        funcoid        │ exec_count │ total_time │ avg_time │ stddev_time │ min_time │ max_time │
╞═══════════════════════╪════════════╪════════════╪══════════╪═════════════╪══════════╪══════════╡
│ fxx(double precision) │          1 │       0.01 │     0.01 │        0.00 │     0.01 │     0.01 │
└───────────────────────┴────────────┴────────────┴──────────┴─────────────┴──────────┴──────────┘
(1 row)

There are two functions for cleaning stored profiles: plpgsql_profiler_reset_all() and plpgsql_profiler_reset(regprocedure).

Coverage metrics

plpgsql_check provides two functions:

  • plpgsql_coverage_statements(name)
  • plpgsql_coverage_branches(name)

Note

There is another very good PLpgSQL profiler - https://bitbucket.org/openscg/plprofiler

My extension is designed to be simple for use and practical. Nothing more or less.

plprofiler is more complex. It build call graphs and from this graph it can creates flame graph of execution times.

Both extensions can be used together with buildin PostgreSQL's feature - tracking functions.

set track_functions to 'pl';
...
select * from pg_stat_user_functions;

Tracer

plpgsql_check provides a tracing possibility - in this mode you can see notices on start or end functions (terse and default verbosity) and start or end statements (verbose verbosity). For default and verbose verbosity the content of function arguments is displayed. The content of related variables are displayed when verbosity is verbose.

postgres=# do $$ begin perform fx(10,null, 'now', e'stěhule'); end; $$;
NOTICE:  #0 ->> start of inline_code_block (Oid=0)
NOTICE:  #2   ->> start of function fx(integer,integer,date,text) (Oid=16405)
NOTICE:  #2        call by inline_code_block line 1 at PERFORM
NOTICE:  #2       "a" => '10', "b" => null, "c" => '2020-08-03', "d" => 'stěhule'
NOTICE:  #4     ->> start of function fx(integer) (Oid=16404)
NOTICE:  #4          call by fx(integer,integer,date,text) line 1 at PERFORM
NOTICE:  #4         "a" => '10'
NOTICE:  #4     <<- end of function fx (elapsed time=0.098 ms)
NOTICE:  #2   <<- end of function fx (elapsed time=0.399 ms)
NOTICE:  #0 <<- end of block (elapsed time=0.754 ms)

The number after # is a execution frame counter (this number is related to deep of error context stack). It allows to pair start end and of function.

Tracing is enabled by setting plpgsql_check.tracer to on. Attention - enabling this behaviour has significant negative impact on performance (unlike the profiler). You can set a level for output used by tracer plpgsql_check.tracer_errlevel (default is notice). The output content is limited by length specified by plpgsql_check.tracer_variable_max_length configuration variable.

In terse verbose mode the output is reduced:

postgres=# set plpgsql_check.tracer_verbosity TO terse;
SET
postgres=# do $$ begin perform fx(10,null, 'now', e'stěhule'); end; $$;
NOTICE:  #0 start of inline code block (oid=0)
NOTICE:  #2 start of fx (oid=16405)
NOTICE:  #4 start of fx (oid=16404)
NOTICE:  #4 end of fx
NOTICE:  #2 end of fx
NOTICE:  #0 end of inline code block

In verbose mode the output is extended about statement details:

postgres=# do $$ begin perform fx(10,null, 'now', e'stěhule'); end; $$;
NOTICE:  #0            ->> start of block inline_code_block (oid=0)
NOTICE:  #0.1       1  --> start of PERFORM
NOTICE:  #2              ->> start of function fx(integer,integer,date,text) (oid=16405)
NOTICE:  #2                   call by inline_code_block line 1 at PERFORM
NOTICE:  #2                  "a" => '10', "b" => null, "c" => '2020-08-04', "d" => 'stěhule'
NOTICE:  #2.1       1    --> start of PERFORM
NOTICE:  #2.1                "a" => '10'
NOTICE:  #4                ->> start of function fx(integer) (oid=16404)
NOTICE:  #4                     call by fx(integer,integer,date,text) line 1 at PERFORM
NOTICE:  #4                    "a" => '10'
NOTICE:  #4.1       6      --> start of assignment
NOTICE:  #4.1                  "a" => '10', "b" => '20'
NOTICE:  #4.1              <-- end of assignment (elapsed time=0.076 ms)
NOTICE:  #4.1                  "res" => '130'
NOTICE:  #4.2       7      --> start of RETURN
NOTICE:  #4.2                  "res" => '130'
NOTICE:  #4.2              <-- end of RETURN (elapsed time=0.054 ms)
NOTICE:  #4                <<- end of function fx (elapsed time=0.373 ms)
NOTICE:  #2.1            <-- end of PERFORM (elapsed time=0.589 ms)
NOTICE:  #2              <<- end of function fx (elapsed time=0.727 ms)
NOTICE:  #0.1          <-- end of PERFORM (elapsed time=1.147 ms)
NOTICE:  #0            <<- end of block (elapsed time=1.286 ms)

Special feature of tracer is tracing of ASSERT statement when plpgsql_check.trace_assert is on. When plpgsql_check.trace_assert_verbosity is DEFAULT, then all function's or procedure's variables are displayed when assert expression is false. When this configuration is VERBOSE then all variables from all plpgsql frames are displayed. This behaviour is independent on plpgsql.check_asserts value. It can be used, although the assertions are disabled in plpgsql runtime.

postgres=# set plpgsql_check.tracer to off;
postgres=# set plpgsql_check.trace_assert_verbosity TO verbose;

postgres=# do $$ begin perform fx(10,null, 'now', e'stěhule'); end; $$;
NOTICE:  #4 PLpgSQL assert expression (false) on line 12 of fx(integer) is false
NOTICE:   "a" => '10', "res" => null, "b" => '20'
NOTICE:  #2 PL/pgSQL function fx(integer,integer,date,text) line 1 at PERFORM
NOTICE:   "a" => '10', "b" => null, "c" => '2020-08-05', "d" => 'stěhule'
NOTICE:  #0 PL/pgSQL function inline_code_block line 1 at PERFORM
ERROR:  assertion failed
CONTEXT:  PL/pgSQL function fx(integer) line 12 at ASSERT
SQL statement "SELECT fx(a)"
PL/pgSQL function fx(integer,integer,date,text) line 1 at PERFORM
SQL statement "SELECT fx(10,null, 'now', e'stěhule')"
PL/pgSQL function inline_code_block line 1 at PERFORM

postgres=# set plpgsql.check_asserts to off;
SET
postgres=# do $$ begin perform fx(10,null, 'now', e'stěhule'); end; $$;
NOTICE:  #4 PLpgSQL assert expression (false) on line 12 of fx(integer) is false
NOTICE:   "a" => '10', "res" => null, "b" => '20'
NOTICE:  #2 PL/pgSQL function fx(integer,integer,date,text) line 1 at PERFORM
NOTICE:   "a" => '10', "b" => null, "c" => '2020-08-05', "d" => 'stěhule'
NOTICE:  #0 PL/pgSQL function inline_code_block line 1 at PERFORM
DO

Attention - SECURITY

Tracer prints content of variables or function arguments. For security definer function, this content can hold security sensitive data. This is reason why tracer is disabled by default and should be enabled only with super user rights plpgsql_check.enable_tracer.

Pragma

You can configure plpgsql_check behave inside checked function with "pragma" function. This is a analogy of PL/SQL or ADA language of PRAGMA feature. PLpgSQL doesn't support PRAGMA, but plpgsql_check detects function named plpgsql_check_pragma and get options from parameters of this function. These plpgsql_check options are valid to end of group of statements.

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION test()
RETURNS void AS $$
BEGIN
  ...
  -- for following statements disable check
  PERFORM plpgsql_check_pragma('disable:check');
  ...
  -- enable check again
  PERFORM plpgsql_check_pragma('enable:check');
  ...
END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;

The function plpgsql_check_pragma is immutable function that returns one. It is defined by plpgsql_check extension. You can declare alternative plpgsql_check_pragma function like:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION plpgsql_check_pragma(VARIADIC args[])
RETURNS int AS $$
SELECT 1
$$ LANGUAGE sql IMMUTABLE;

Using pragma function in declaration part of top block sets options on function level too.

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION test()
RETURNS void AS $$
DECLARE
  aux int := plpgsql_check_pragma('disable:extra_warnings');
  ...

Shorter syntax for pragma is supported too:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION test()
RETURNS void AS $$
DECLARE r record;
BEGIN
  PERFORM 'PRAGMA:TYPE:r (a int, b int)';
  PERFORM 'PRAGMA:TABLE: x (like pg_class)';
  ...

Supported pragmas

echo:str - print string (for testing)

status:check,status:tracer, status:other_warnings, status:performance_warnings, status:extra_warnings,status:security_warnings

enable:check,enable:tracer, enable:other_warnings, enable:performance_warnings, enable:extra_warnings,enable:security_warnings

disable:check,disable:tracer, disable:other_warnings, disable:performance_warnings, disable:extra_warnings,disable:security_warnings

type:varname typename or type:varname (fieldname type, ...) - set type to variable of record type

table: name (column_name type, ...) or table: name (like tablename) - create ephereal table

Pragmas enable:tracer and disable:tracerare active for Postgres 12 and higher

Compilation

You need a development environment for PostgreSQL extensions:

make clean
make install

result:

[pavel@localhost plpgsql_check]$ make USE_PGXS=1 clean
rm -f plpgsql_check.so   libplpgsql_check.a  libplpgsql_check.pc
rm -f plpgsql_check.o
rm -rf results/ regression.diffs regression.out tmp_check/ log/
[pavel@localhost plpgsql_check]$ make USE_PGXS=1 all
clang -O2 -Wall -Wmissing-prototypes -Wpointer-arith -Wdeclaration-after-statement -Wendif-labels -Wmissing-format-attribute -Wformat-security -fno-strict-aliasing -fwrapv -fpic -I/usr/local/pgsql/lib/pgxs/src/makefiles/../../src/pl/plpgsql/src -I. -I./ -I/usr/local/pgsql/include/server -I/usr/local/pgsql/include/internal -D_GNU_SOURCE   -c -o plpgsql_check.o plpgsql_check.c
clang -O2 -Wall -Wmissing-prototypes -Wpointer-arith -Wdeclaration-after-statement -Wendif-labels -Wmissing-format-attribute -Wformat-security -fno-strict-aliasing -fwrapv -fpic -I/usr/local/pgsql/lib/pgxs/src/makefiles/../../src/pl/plpgsql/src -shared -o plpgsql_check.so plpgsql_check.o -L/usr/local/pgsql/lib -Wl,--as-needed -Wl,-rpath,'/usr/local/pgsql/lib',--enable-new-dtags  
[pavel@localhost plpgsql_check]$ su root
Password: *******
[root@localhost plpgsql_check]# make USE_PGXS=1 install
/usr/bin/mkdir -p '/usr/local/pgsql/lib'
/usr/bin/mkdir -p '/usr/local/pgsql/share/extension'
/usr/bin/mkdir -p '/usr/local/pgsql/share/extension'
/usr/bin/install -c -m 755  plpgsql_check.so '/usr/local/pgsql/lib/plpgsql_check.so'
/usr/bin/install -c -m 644 plpgsql_check.control '/usr/local/pgsql/share/extension/'
/usr/bin/install -c -m 644 plpgsql_check--0.9.sql '/usr/local/pgsql/share/extension/'
[root@localhost plpgsql_check]# exit
[pavel@localhost plpgsql_check]$ make USE_PGXS=1 installcheck
/usr/local/pgsql/lib/pgxs/src/makefiles/../../src/test/regress/pg_regress --inputdir=./ --psqldir='/usr/local/pgsql/bin'    --dbname=pl_regression --load-language=plpgsql --dbname=contrib_regression plpgsql_check_passive plpgsql_check_active plpgsql_check_active-9.5
(using postmaster on Unix socket, default port)
============== dropping database "contrib_regression" ==============
DROP DATABASE
============== creating database "contrib_regression" ==============
CREATE DATABASE
ALTER DATABASE
============== installing plpgsql                     ==============
CREATE LANGUAGE
============== running regression test queries        ==============
test plpgsql_check_passive    ... ok
test plpgsql_check_active     ... ok
test plpgsql_check_active-9.5 ... ok

=====================
 All 3 tests passed. 
=====================

Compilation on Ubuntu

Sometimes successful compilation can require libicu-dev package (PostgreSQL 10 and higher - when pg was compiled with ICU support)

sudo apt install libicu-dev

Compilation plpgsql_check on Windows

You can check precompiled dll libraries http://okbob.blogspot.cz/2015/02/plpgsqlcheck-is-available-for-microsoft.html

or compile by self:

  1. Download and install PostgreSQL for Win32 from http://www.enterprisedb.com
  2. Download and install Microsoft Visual C++ Express
  3. Lern tutorial http://blog.2ndquadrant.com/compiling-postgresql-extensions-visual-studio-windows
  4. Build plpgsql_check.dll
  5. Install plugin
  6. copy plpgsql_check.dll to PostgreSQL\14\lib
  7. copy plpgsql_check.control and plpgsql_check--2.1.sql to PostgreSQL\14\share\extension

Checked on

  • gcc on Linux (against all supported PostgreSQL)
  • clang 3.4 on Linux (against PostgreSQL 10)
  • for success regress tests the PostgreSQL 10 or higher is required

Compilation against PostgreSQL 10 requires libICU!

Licence

Copyright (c) Pavel Stehule (pavel.stehule@gmail.com)

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.

Note

If you like it, send a postcard to address

Pavel Stehule
Skalice 12
256 01 Benesov u Prahy
Czech Republic

I invite any questions, comments, bug reports, patches on mail address pavel.stehule@gmail.com


Author: okbob
Source Code: https://github.com/okbob/plpgsql_check
License: View license

#postgresql 

Franz  Becker

Franz Becker

1648803600

Plpgsql Check: Extension That Allows to Check Plpgsql Source Code.

plpgsql_check

I founded this project, because I wanted to publish the code I wrote in the last two years, when I tried to write enhanced checking for PostgreSQL upstream. It was not fully successful - integration into upstream requires some larger plpgsql refactoring - probably it will not be done in next years (now is Dec 2013). But written code is fully functional and can be used in production (and it is used in production). So, I created this extension to be available for all plpgsql developers.

If you like it and if you would to join to development of this extension, register yourself to postgresql extension hacking google group.

Features

  • check fields of referenced database objects and types inside embedded SQL
  • using correct types of function parameters
  • unused variables and function argumens, unmodified OUT argumens
  • partially detection of dead code (due RETURN command)
  • detection of missing RETURN command in function
  • try to identify unwanted hidden casts, that can be performance issue like unused indexes
  • possibility to collect relations and functions used by function
  • possibility to check EXECUTE stmt agaist SQL injection vulnerability

I invite any ideas, patches, bugreports.

plpgsql_check is next generation of plpgsql_lint. It allows to check source code by explicit call plpgsql_check_function.

PostgreSQL PostgreSQL 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14 are supported.

The SQL statements inside PL/pgSQL functions are checked by validator for semantic errors. These errors can be found by plpgsql_check_function:

Active mode

postgres=# CREATE EXTENSION plpgsql_check;
LOAD
postgres=# CREATE TABLE t1(a int, b int);
CREATE TABLE

postgres=#
CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION public.f1()
RETURNS void
LANGUAGE plpgsql
AS $function$
DECLARE r record;
BEGIN
  FOR r IN SELECT * FROM t1
  LOOP
    RAISE NOTICE '%', r.c; -- there is bug - table t1 missing "c" column
  END LOOP;
END;
$function$;

CREATE FUNCTION

postgres=# select f1(); -- execution doesn't find a bug due to empty table t1
  f1 
 ────
   
 (1 row)

postgres=# \x
Expanded display is on.
postgres=# select * from plpgsql_check_function_tb('f1()');
─[ RECORD 1 ]───────────────────────────
functionid │ f1
lineno     │ 6
statement  │ RAISE
sqlstate   │ 42703
message    │ record "r" has no field "c"
detail     │ [null]
hint       │ [null]
level      │ error
position   │ 0
query      │ [null]

postgres=# \sf+ f1
    CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION public.f1()
     RETURNS void
     LANGUAGE plpgsql
1       AS $function$
2       DECLARE r record;
3       BEGIN
4         FOR r IN SELECT * FROM t1
5         LOOP
6           RAISE NOTICE '%', r.c; -- there is bug - table t1 missing "c" column
7         END LOOP;
8       END;
9       $function$

Function plpgsql_check_function() has three possible formats: text, json or xml

select * from plpgsql_check_function('f1()', fatal_errors := false);
                         plpgsql_check_function                         
------------------------------------------------------------------------
 error:42703:4:SQL statement:column "c" of relation "t1" does not exist
 Query: update t1 set c = 30
 --                   ^
 error:42P01:7:RAISE:missing FROM-clause entry for table "r"
 Query: SELECT r.c
 --            ^
 error:42601:7:RAISE:too few parameters specified for RAISE
(7 rows)

postgres=# select * from plpgsql_check_function('fx()', format:='xml');
                 plpgsql_check_function                     
────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────
 <Function oid="16400">                                        ↵
   <Issue>                                                     ↵
     <Level>error</level>                                      ↵
     <Sqlstate>42P01</Sqlstate>                                ↵
     <Message>relation "foo111" does not exist</Message>       ↵
     <Stmt lineno="3">RETURN</Stmt>                            ↵
     <Query position="23">SELECT (select a from foo111)</Query>↵
   </Issue>                                                    ↵
  </Function>
 (1 row)

Arguments

You can set level of warnings via function's parameters:

Mandatory arguments

  • function name or function signature - these functions requires function specification. Any function in PostgreSQL can be specified by Oid or by name or by signature. When you know oid or complete function's signature, you can use a regprocedure type parameter like 'fx()'::regprocedure or 16799::regprocedure. Possible alternative is using a name only, when function's name is unique - like 'fx'. When the name is not unique or the function doesn't exists it raises a error.

Optional arguments

relid DEFAULT 0 - oid of relation assigned with trigger function. It is necessary for check of any trigger function.

fatal_errors boolean DEFAULT true - stop on first error

other_warnings boolean DEFAULT true - show warnings like different attributes number in assignmenet on left and right side, variable overlaps function's parameter, unused variables, unwanted casting, ..

extra_warnings boolean DEFAULT true - show warnings like missing RETURN, shadowed variables, dead code, never read (unused) function's parameter, unmodified variables, modified auto variables, ..

performance_warnings boolean DEFAULT false - performance related warnings like declared type with type modificator, casting, implicit casts in where clause (can be reason why index is not used), ..

security_warnings boolean DEFAULT false - security related checks like SQL injection vulnerability detection

anyelementtype regtype DEFAULT 'int' - a real type used instead anyelement type

anyenumtype regtype DEFAULT '-' - a real type used instead anyenum type

anyrangetype regtype DEFAULT 'int4range' - a real type used instead anyrange type

anycompatibletype DEFAULT 'int' - a real type used instead anycompatible type

anycompatiblerangetype DEFAULT 'int4range' - a real type used instead anycompatible range type

without_warnings DEFAULT false - disable all warnings

all_warnings DEFAULT false - enable all warnings

newtable DEFAULT NULL, oldtable DEFAULT NULL - the names of NEW or OLD transitive tables. These parameters are required when transitive tables are used.

Triggers

When you want to check any trigger, you have to enter a relation that will be used together with trigger function

CREATE TABLE bar(a int, b int);

postgres=# \sf+ foo_trg
    CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION public.foo_trg()
         RETURNS trigger
         LANGUAGE plpgsql
1       AS $function$
2       BEGIN
3         NEW.c := NEW.a + NEW.b;
4         RETURN NEW;
5       END;
6       $function$

Missing relation specification

postgres=# select * from plpgsql_check_function('foo_trg()');
ERROR:  missing trigger relation
HINT:  Trigger relation oid must be valid

Correct trigger checking (with specified relation)

postgres=# select * from plpgsql_check_function('foo_trg()', 'bar');
                 plpgsql_check_function                 
--------------------------------------------------------
 error:42703:3:assignment:record "new" has no field "c"
(1 row)

For triggers with transitive tables you can set a oldtable or newtable parameters:

create or replace function footab_trig_func()
returns trigger as $$
declare x int;
begin
  if false then
    -- should be ok;
    select count(*) from newtab into x; 

    -- should fail;
    select count(*) from newtab where d = 10 into x;
  end if;
  return null;
end;
$$ language plpgsql;

select * from plpgsql_check_function('footab_trig_func','footab', newtable := 'newtab');

Mass check

You can use the plpgsql_check_function for mass check functions and mass check triggers. Please, test following queries:

-- check all nontrigger plpgsql functions
SELECT p.oid, p.proname, plpgsql_check_function(p.oid)
   FROM pg_catalog.pg_namespace n
   JOIN pg_catalog.pg_proc p ON pronamespace = n.oid
   JOIN pg_catalog.pg_language l ON p.prolang = l.oid
  WHERE l.lanname = 'plpgsql' AND p.prorettype <> 2279;

or

SELECT p.proname, tgrelid::regclass, cf.*
   FROM pg_proc p
        JOIN pg_trigger t ON t.tgfoid = p.oid 
        JOIN pg_language l ON p.prolang = l.oid
        JOIN pg_namespace n ON p.pronamespace = n.oid,
        LATERAL plpgsql_check_function(p.oid, t.tgrelid) cf
  WHERE n.nspname = 'public' and l.lanname = 'plpgsql'

or

-- check all plpgsql functions (functions or trigger functions with defined triggers)
SELECT
    (pcf).functionid::regprocedure, (pcf).lineno, (pcf).statement,
    (pcf).sqlstate, (pcf).message, (pcf).detail, (pcf).hint, (pcf).level,
    (pcf)."position", (pcf).query, (pcf).context
FROM
(
    SELECT
        plpgsql_check_function_tb(pg_proc.oid, COALESCE(pg_trigger.tgrelid, 0)) AS pcf
    FROM pg_proc
    LEFT JOIN pg_trigger
        ON (pg_trigger.tgfoid = pg_proc.oid)
    WHERE
        prolang = (SELECT lang.oid FROM pg_language lang WHERE lang.lanname = 'plpgsql') AND
        pronamespace <> (SELECT nsp.oid FROM pg_namespace nsp WHERE nsp.nspname = 'pg_catalog') AND
        -- ignore unused triggers
        (pg_proc.prorettype <> (SELECT typ.oid FROM pg_type typ WHERE typ.typname = 'trigger') OR
         pg_trigger.tgfoid IS NOT NULL)
    OFFSET 0
) ss
ORDER BY (pcf).functionid::regprocedure::text, (pcf).lineno

Passive mode

Functions should be checked on start - plpgsql_check module must be loaded.

Configuration

plpgsql_check.mode = [ disabled | by_function | fresh_start | every_start ]
plpgsql_check.fatal_errors = [ yes | no ]

plpgsql_check.show_nonperformance_warnings = false
plpgsql_check.show_performance_warnings = false

Default mode is by_function, that means that the enhanced check is done only in active mode - by plpgsql_check_function. fresh_start means cold start.

You can enable passive mode by

load 'plpgsql'; -- 1.1 and higher doesn't need it
load 'plpgsql_check';
set plpgsql_check.mode = 'every_start';

SELECT fx(10); -- run functions - function is checked before runtime starts it

Limits

plpgsql_check should find almost all errors on really static code. When developer use some PLpgSQL's dynamic features like dynamic SQL or record data type, then false positives are possible. These should be rare - in well written code - and then the affected function should be redesigned or plpgsql_check should be disabled for this function.

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION f1()
RETURNS void AS $$
DECLARE r record;
BEGIN
  FOR r IN EXECUTE 'SELECT * FROM t1'
  LOOP
    RAISE NOTICE '%', r.c;
  END LOOP;
END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql SET plpgsql.enable_check TO false;

A usage of plpgsql_check adds a small overhead (in enabled passive mode) and you should use it only in develop or preprod environments.

Dynamic SQL

This module doesn't check queries that are assembled in runtime. It is not possible to identify results of dynamic queries - so plpgsql_check cannot to set correct type to record variables and cannot to check a dependent SQLs and expressions.

When type of record's variable is not know, you can assign it explicitly with pragma type:

DECLARE r record;
BEGIN
  EXECUTE format('SELECT * FROM %I', _tablename) INTO r;
  PERFORM plpgsql_check_pragma('type: r (id int, processed bool)');
  IF NOT r.processed THEN
    ...

Attention: The SQL injection check can detect only some SQL injection vulnerabilities. This tool cannot be used for security audit! Some issues should not be detected. This check can raise false alarms too - probably when variable is sanitized by other command or when value is of some compose type. 

Refcursors

plpgsql_check should not to detect structure of referenced cursors. A reference on cursor in PLpgSQL is implemented as name of global cursor. In check time, the name is not known (not in all possibilities), and global cursor doesn't exist. It is significant break for any static analyse. PLpgSQL cannot to set correct type for record variables and cannot to check a dependent SQLs and expressions. A solution is same like dynamic SQL. Don't use record variable as target when you use refcursor type or disable plpgsql_check for these functions.

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION foo(refcur_var refcursor)
RETURNS void AS $$
DECLARE
  rec_var record;
BEGIN
  FETCH refcur_var INTO rec_var; -- this is STOP for plpgsql_check
  RAISE NOTICE '%', rec_var;     -- record rec_var is not assigned yet error

In this case a record type should not be used (use known rowtype instead):

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION foo(refcur_var refcursor)
RETURNS void AS $$
DECLARE
  rec_var some_rowtype;
BEGIN
  FETCH refcur_var INTO rec_var;
  RAISE NOTICE '%', rec_var;

Temporary tables

plpgsql_check cannot verify queries over temporary tables that are created in plpgsql's function runtime. For this use case it is necessary to create a fake temp table or disable plpgsql_check for this function.

In reality temp tables are stored in own (per user) schema with higher priority than persistent tables. So you can do (with following trick safetly):

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION public.disable_dml()
RETURNS trigger
LANGUAGE plpgsql AS $function$
BEGIN
  RAISE EXCEPTION SQLSTATE '42P01'
     USING message = format('this instance of %I table doesn''t allow any DML operation', TG_TABLE_NAME),
           hint = format('you should to run "CREATE TEMP TABLE %1$I(LIKE %1$I INCLUDING ALL);" statement',
                         TG_TABLE_NAME);
  RETURN NULL;
END;
$function$;

CREATE TABLE foo(a int, b int); -- doesn't hold data ever
CREATE TRIGGER foo_disable_dml
   BEFORE INSERT OR UPDATE OR DELETE ON foo
   EXECUTE PROCEDURE disable_dml();

postgres=# INSERT INTO  foo VALUES(10,20);
ERROR:  this instance of foo table doesn't allow any DML operation
HINT:  you should to run "CREATE TEMP TABLE foo(LIKE foo INCLUDING ALL);" statement
postgres=# 

CREATE TABLE
postgres=# INSERT INTO  foo VALUES(10,20);
INSERT 0 1

This trick emulates GLOBAL TEMP tables partially and it allows a statical validation. Other possibility is using a [template foreign data wrapper] (https://github.com/okbob/template_fdw)

You can use pragma table and create ephemeral table:

BEGIN
   CREATE TEMP TABLE xxx(a int);
   PERFORM plpgsql_check_pragma('table: xxx(a int)');
   INSERT INTO xxx VALUES(10);

Dependency list

A function plpgsql_show_dependency_tb can show all functions, operators and relations used inside processed function:

postgres=# select * from plpgsql_show_dependency_tb('testfunc(int,float)');
┌──────────┬───────┬────────┬─────────┬────────────────────────────┐
│   type   │  oid  │ schema │  name   │           params           │
╞══════════╪═══════╪════════╪═════════╪════════════════════════════╡
│ FUNCTION │ 36008 │ public │ myfunc1 │ (integer,double precision) │
│ FUNCTION │ 35999 │ public │ myfunc2 │ (integer,double precision) │
│ OPERATOR │ 36007 │ public │ **      │ (integer,integer)          │
│ RELATION │ 36005 │ public │ myview  │                            │
│ RELATION │ 36002 │ public │ mytable │                            │
└──────────┴───────┴────────┴─────────┴────────────────────────────┘
(4 rows)

Profiler

The plpgsql_check contains simple profiler of plpgsql functions and procedures. It can work with/without a access to shared memory. It depends on shared_preload_libraries config. When plpgsql_check was initialized by shared_preload_libraries, then it can allocate shared memory, and function's profiles are stored there. When plpgsql_check cannot to allocate shared momory, the profile is stored in session memory.

Due dependencies, shared_preload_libraries should to contains plpgsql first

postgres=# show shared_preload_libraries ;
┌──────────────────────────┐
│ shared_preload_libraries │
╞══════════════════════════╡
│ plpgsql,plpgsql_check    │
└──────────────────────────┘
(1 row)

The profiler is active when GUC plpgsql_check.profiler is on. The profiler doesn't require shared memory, but if there are not shared memory, then the profile is limmitted just to active session.

When plpgsql_check is initialized by shared_preload_libraries, another GUC is available to configure the amount of shared memory used by the profiler: plpgsql_check.profiler_max_shared_chunks. This defines the maximum number of statements chunk that can be stored in shared memory. For each plpgsql function (or procedure), the whole content is split into chunks of 30 statements. If needed, multiple chunks can be used to store the whole content of a single function. A single chunk is 1704 bytes. The default value for this GUC is 15000, which should be enough for big projects containing hundred of thousands of statements in plpgsql, and will consume about 24MB of memory. If your project doesn't require that much number of chunks, you can set this parameter to a smaller number in order to decrease the memory usage. The minimum value is 50 (which should consume about 83kB of memory), and the maximum value is 100000 (which should consume about 163MB of memory). Changing this parameter requires a PostgreSQL restart.

The profiler will also retrieve the query identifier for each instruction that contains an expression or optimizable statement. Note that this requires pg_stat_statements, or another similar third-party extension), to be installed. There are some limitations to the query identifier retrieval:

  • if a plpgsql expression contains underlying statements, only the top level query identifier will be retrieved
  • the profiler doesn't compute query identifier by itself but relies on external extension, such as pg_stat_statements, for that. It means that depending on the external extension behavior, you may not be able to see a query identifier for some statements. That's for instance the case with DDL statements, as pg_stat_statements doesn't expose the query identifier for such queries.
  • a query identifier is retrieved only for instructions containing expressions. This means that plpgsql_profiler_function_tb() function can report less query identifier than instructions on a single line.

Attention: A update of shared profiles can decrease performance on servers under higher load.

The profile can be displayed by function plpgsql_profiler_function_tb:

postgres=# select lineno, avg_time, source from plpgsql_profiler_function_tb('fx(int)');
┌────────┬──────────┬───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┐
│ lineno │ avg_time │                              source                               │
╞════════╪══════════╪═══════════════════════════════════════════════════════════════════╡
│      1 │          │                                                                   │
│      2 │          │ declare result int = 0;                                           │
│      3 │    0.075 │ begin                                                             │
│      4 │    0.202 │   for i in 1..$1 loop                                             │
│      5 │    0.005 │     select result + i into result; select result + i into result; │
│      6 │          │   end loop;                                                       │
│      7 │        0 │   return result;                                                  │
│      8 │          │ end;                                                              │
└────────┴──────────┴───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┘
(9 rows)

The profile per statements (not per line) can be displayed by function plpgsql_profiler_function_statements_tb:

        CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION public.fx1(a integer)
         RETURNS integer
         LANGUAGE plpgsql
1       AS $function$
2       begin
3         if a > 10 then
4           raise notice 'ahoj';
5           return -1;
6         else
7           raise notice 'nazdar';
8           return 1;
9         end if;
10      end;
11      $function$

postgres=# select stmtid, parent_stmtid, parent_note, lineno, exec_stmts, stmtname
             from plpgsql_profiler_function_statements_tb('fx1');
┌────────┬───────────────┬─────────────┬────────┬────────────┬─────────────────┐
│ stmtid │ parent_stmtid │ parent_note │ lineno │ exec_stmts │    stmtname     │
╞════════╪═══════════════╪═════════════╪════════╪════════════╪═════════════════╡
│      0 │             ∅ │ ∅           │      2 │          0 │ statement block │
│      1 │             0 │ body        │      3 │          0 │ IF              │
│      2 │             1 │ then body   │      4 │          0 │ RAISE           │
│      3 │             1 │ then body   │      5 │          0 │ RETURN          │
│      4 │             1 │ else body   │      7 │          0 │ RAISE           │
│      5 │             1 │ else body   │      8 │          0 │ RETURN          │
└────────┴───────────────┴─────────────┴────────┴────────────┴─────────────────┘
(6 rows)

All stored profiles can be displayed by calling function plpgsql_profiler_functions_all:

postgres=# select * from plpgsql_profiler_functions_all();
┌───────────────────────┬────────────┬────────────┬──────────┬─────────────┬──────────┬──────────┐
│        funcoid        │ exec_count │ total_time │ avg_time │ stddev_time │ min_time │ max_time │
╞═══════════════════════╪════════════╪════════════╪══════════╪═════════════╪══════════╪══════════╡
│ fxx(double precision) │          1 │       0.01 │     0.01 │        0.00 │     0.01 │     0.01 │
└───────────────────────┴────────────┴────────────┴──────────┴─────────────┴──────────┴──────────┘
(1 row)

There are two functions for cleaning stored profiles: plpgsql_profiler_reset_all() and plpgsql_profiler_reset(regprocedure).

Coverage metrics

plpgsql_check provides two functions:

  • plpgsql_coverage_statements(name)
  • plpgsql_coverage_branches(name)

Note

There is another very good PLpgSQL profiler - https://bitbucket.org/openscg/plprofiler

My extension is designed to be simple for use and practical. Nothing more or less.

plprofiler is more complex. It build call graphs and from this graph it can creates flame graph of execution times.

Both extensions can be used together with buildin PostgreSQL's feature - tracking functions.

set track_functions to 'pl';
...
select * from pg_stat_user_functions;

Tracer

plpgsql_check provides a tracing possibility - in this mode you can see notices on start or end functions (terse and default verbosity) and start or end statements (verbose verbosity). For default and verbose verbosity the content of function arguments is displayed. The content of related variables are displayed when verbosity is verbose.

postgres=# do $$ begin perform fx(10,null, 'now', e'stěhule'); end; $$;
NOTICE:  #0 ->> start of inline_code_block (Oid=0)
NOTICE:  #2   ->> start of function fx(integer,integer,date,text) (Oid=16405)
NOTICE:  #2        call by inline_code_block line 1 at PERFORM
NOTICE:  #2       "a" => '10', "b" => null, "c" => '2020-08-03', "d" => 'stěhule'
NOTICE:  #4     ->> start of function fx(integer) (Oid=16404)
NOTICE:  #4          call by fx(integer,integer,date,text) line 1 at PERFORM
NOTICE:  #4         "a" => '10'
NOTICE:  #4     <<- end of function fx (elapsed time=0.098 ms)
NOTICE:  #2   <<- end of function fx (elapsed time=0.399 ms)
NOTICE:  #0 <<- end of block (elapsed time=0.754 ms)

The number after # is a execution frame counter (this number is related to deep of error context stack). It allows to pair start end and of function.

Tracing is enabled by setting plpgsql_check.tracer to on. Attention - enabling this behaviour has significant negative impact on performance (unlike the profiler). You can set a level for output used by tracer plpgsql_check.tracer_errlevel (default is notice). The output content is limited by length specified by plpgsql_check.tracer_variable_max_length configuration variable.

In terse verbose mode the output is reduced:

postgres=# set plpgsql_check.tracer_verbosity TO terse;
SET
postgres=# do $$ begin perform fx(10,null, 'now', e'stěhule'); end; $$;
NOTICE:  #0 start of inline code block (oid=0)
NOTICE:  #2 start of fx (oid=16405)
NOTICE:  #4 start of fx (oid=16404)
NOTICE:  #4 end of fx
NOTICE:  #2 end of fx
NOTICE:  #0 end of inline code block

In verbose mode the output is extended about statement details:

postgres=# do $$ begin perform fx(10,null, 'now', e'stěhule'); end; $$;
NOTICE:  #0            ->> start of block inline_code_block (oid=0)
NOTICE:  #0.1       1  --> start of PERFORM
NOTICE:  #2              ->> start of function fx(integer,integer,date,text) (oid=16405)
NOTICE:  #2                   call by inline_code_block line 1 at PERFORM
NOTICE:  #2                  "a" => '10', "b" => null, "c" => '2020-08-04', "d" => 'stěhule'
NOTICE:  #2.1       1    --> start of PERFORM
NOTICE:  #2.1                "a" => '10'
NOTICE:  #4                ->> start of function fx(integer) (oid=16404)
NOTICE:  #4                     call by fx(integer,integer,date,text) line 1 at PERFORM
NOTICE:  #4                    "a" => '10'
NOTICE:  #4.1       6      --> start of assignment
NOTICE:  #4.1                  "a" => '10', "b" => '20'
NOTICE:  #4.1              <-- end of assignment (elapsed time=0.076 ms)
NOTICE:  #4.1                  "res" => '130'
NOTICE:  #4.2       7      --> start of RETURN
NOTICE:  #4.2                  "res" => '130'
NOTICE:  #4.2              <-- end of RETURN (elapsed time=0.054 ms)
NOTICE:  #4                <<- end of function fx (elapsed time=0.373 ms)
NOTICE:  #2.1            <-- end of PERFORM (elapsed time=0.589 ms)
NOTICE:  #2              <<- end of function fx (elapsed time=0.727 ms)
NOTICE:  #0.1          <-- end of PERFORM (elapsed time=1.147 ms)
NOTICE:  #0            <<- end of block (elapsed time=1.286 ms)

Special feature of tracer is tracing of ASSERT statement when plpgsql_check.trace_assert is on. When plpgsql_check.trace_assert_verbosity is DEFAULT, then all function's or procedure's variables are displayed when assert expression is false. When this configuration is VERBOSE then all variables from all plpgsql frames are displayed. This behaviour is independent on plpgsql.check_asserts value. It can be used, although the assertions are disabled in plpgsql runtime.

postgres=# set plpgsql_check.tracer to off;
postgres=# set plpgsql_check.trace_assert_verbosity TO verbose;

postgres=# do $$ begin perform fx(10,null, 'now', e'stěhule'); end; $$;
NOTICE:  #4 PLpgSQL assert expression (false) on line 12 of fx(integer) is false
NOTICE:   "a" => '10', "res" => null, "b" => '20'
NOTICE:  #2 PL/pgSQL function fx(integer,integer,date,text) line 1 at PERFORM
NOTICE:   "a" => '10', "b" => null, "c" => '2020-08-05', "d" => 'stěhule'
NOTICE:  #0 PL/pgSQL function inline_code_block line 1 at PERFORM
ERROR:  assertion failed
CONTEXT:  PL/pgSQL function fx(integer) line 12 at ASSERT
SQL statement "SELECT fx(a)"
PL/pgSQL function fx(integer,integer,date,text) line 1 at PERFORM
SQL statement "SELECT fx(10,null, 'now', e'stěhule')"
PL/pgSQL function inline_code_block line 1 at PERFORM

postgres=# set plpgsql.check_asserts to off;
SET
postgres=# do $$ begin perform fx(10,null, 'now', e'stěhule'); end; $$;
NOTICE:  #4 PLpgSQL assert expression (false) on line 12 of fx(integer) is false
NOTICE:   "a" => '10', "res" => null, "b" => '20'
NOTICE:  #2 PL/pgSQL function fx(integer,integer,date,text) line 1 at PERFORM
NOTICE:   "a" => '10', "b" => null, "c" => '2020-08-05', "d" => 'stěhule'
NOTICE:  #0 PL/pgSQL function inline_code_block line 1 at PERFORM
DO

Attention - SECURITY

Tracer prints content of variables or function arguments. For security definer function, this content can hold security sensitive data. This is reason why tracer is disabled by default and should be enabled only with super user rights plpgsql_check.enable_tracer.

Pragma

You can configure plpgsql_check behave inside checked function with "pragma" function. This is a analogy of PL/SQL or ADA language of PRAGMA feature. PLpgSQL doesn't support PRAGMA, but plpgsql_check detects function named plpgsql_check_pragma and get options from parameters of this function. These plpgsql_check options are valid to end of group of statements.

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION test()
RETURNS void AS $$
BEGIN
  ...
  -- for following statements disable check
  PERFORM plpgsql_check_pragma('disable:check');
  ...
  -- enable check again
  PERFORM plpgsql_check_pragma('enable:check');
  ...
END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;

The function plpgsql_check_pragma is immutable function that returns one. It is defined by plpgsql_check extension. You can declare alternative plpgsql_check_pragma function like:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION plpgsql_check_pragma(VARIADIC args[])
RETURNS int AS $$
SELECT 1
$$ LANGUAGE sql IMMUTABLE;

Using pragma function in declaration part of top block sets options on function level too.

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION test()
RETURNS void AS $$
DECLARE
  aux int := plpgsql_check_pragma('disable:extra_warnings');
  ...

Shorter syntax for pragma is supported too:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION test()
RETURNS void AS $$
DECLARE r record;
BEGIN
  PERFORM 'PRAGMA:TYPE:r (a int, b int)';
  PERFORM 'PRAGMA:TABLE: x (like pg_class)';
  ...

Supported pragmas

echo:str - print string (for testing)

status:check,status:tracer, status:other_warnings, status:performance_warnings, status:extra_warnings,status:security_warnings

enable:check,enable:tracer, enable:other_warnings, enable:performance_warnings, enable:extra_warnings,enable:security_warnings

disable:check,disable:tracer, disable:other_warnings, disable:performance_warnings, disable:extra_warnings,disable:security_warnings

type:varname typename or type:varname (fieldname type, ...) - set type to variable of record type

table: name (column_name type, ...) or table: name (like tablename) - create ephereal table

Pragmas enable:tracer and disable:tracerare active for Postgres 12 and higher

Compilation

You need a development environment for PostgreSQL extensions:

make clean
make install

result:

[pavel@localhost plpgsql_check]$ make USE_PGXS=1 clean
rm -f plpgsql_check.so   libplpgsql_check.a  libplpgsql_check.pc
rm -f plpgsql_check.o
rm -rf results/ regression.diffs regression.out tmp_check/ log/
[pavel@localhost plpgsql_check]$ make USE_PGXS=1 all
clang -O2 -Wall -Wmissing-prototypes -Wpointer-arith -Wdeclaration-after-statement -Wendif-labels -Wmissing-format-attribute -Wformat-security -fno-strict-aliasing -fwrapv -fpic -I/usr/local/pgsql/lib/pgxs/src/makefiles/../../src/pl/plpgsql/src -I. -I./ -I/usr/local/pgsql/include/server -I/usr/local/pgsql/include/internal -D_GNU_SOURCE   -c -o plpgsql_check.o plpgsql_check.c
clang -O2 -Wall -Wmissing-prototypes -Wpointer-arith -Wdeclaration-after-statement -Wendif-labels -Wmissing-format-attribute -Wformat-security -fno-strict-aliasing -fwrapv -fpic -I/usr/local/pgsql/lib/pgxs/src/makefiles/../../src/pl/plpgsql/src -shared -o plpgsql_check.so plpgsql_check.o -L/usr/local/pgsql/lib -Wl,--as-needed -Wl,-rpath,'/usr/local/pgsql/lib',--enable-new-dtags  
[pavel@localhost plpgsql_check]$ su root
Password: *******
[root@localhost plpgsql_check]# make USE_PGXS=1 install
/usr/bin/mkdir -p '/usr/local/pgsql/lib'
/usr/bin/mkdir -p '/usr/local/pgsql/share/extension'
/usr/bin/mkdir -p '/usr/local/pgsql/share/extension'
/usr/bin/install -c -m 755  plpgsql_check.so '/usr/local/pgsql/lib/plpgsql_check.so'
/usr/bin/install -c -m 644 plpgsql_check.control '/usr/local/pgsql/share/extension/'
/usr/bin/install -c -m 644 plpgsql_check--0.9.sql '/usr/local/pgsql/share/extension/'
[root@localhost plpgsql_check]# exit
[pavel@localhost plpgsql_check]$ make USE_PGXS=1 installcheck
/usr/local/pgsql/lib/pgxs/src/makefiles/../../src/test/regress/pg_regress --inputdir=./ --psqldir='/usr/local/pgsql/bin'    --dbname=pl_regression --load-language=plpgsql --dbname=contrib_regression plpgsql_check_passive plpgsql_check_active plpgsql_check_active-9.5
(using postmaster on Unix socket, default port)
============== dropping database "contrib_regression" ==============
DROP DATABASE
============== creating database "contrib_regression" ==============
CREATE DATABASE
ALTER DATABASE
============== installing plpgsql                     ==============
CREATE LANGUAGE
============== running regression test queries        ==============
test plpgsql_check_passive    ... ok
test plpgsql_check_active     ... ok
test plpgsql_check_active-9.5 ... ok

=====================
 All 3 tests passed. 
=====================

Compilation on Ubuntu

Sometimes successful compilation can require libicu-dev package (PostgreSQL 10 and higher - when pg was compiled with ICU support)

sudo apt install libicu-dev

Compilation plpgsql_check on Windows

You can check precompiled dll libraries http://okbob.blogspot.cz/2015/02/plpgsqlcheck-is-available-for-microsoft.html

or compile by self:

  1. Download and install PostgreSQL for Win32 from http://www.enterprisedb.com
  2. Download and install Microsoft Visual C++ Express
  3. Lern tutorial http://blog.2ndquadrant.com/compiling-postgresql-extensions-visual-studio-windows
  4. Build plpgsql_check.dll
  5. Install plugin
  6. copy plpgsql_check.dll to PostgreSQL\14\lib
  7. copy plpgsql_check.control and plpgsql_check--2.1.sql to PostgreSQL\14\share\extension

Checked on

  • gcc on Linux (against all supported PostgreSQL)
  • clang 3.4 on Linux (against PostgreSQL 10)
  • for success regress tests the PostgreSQL 10 or higher is required

Compilation against PostgreSQL 10 requires libICU!

Licence

Copyright (c) Pavel Stehule (pavel.stehule@gmail.com)

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.

Note

If you like it, send a postcard to address

Pavel Stehule
Skalice 12
256 01 Benesov u Prahy
Czech Republic

I invite any questions, comments, bug reports, patches on mail address pavel.stehule@gmail.com


Author: okbob
Source Code: https://github.com/okbob/plpgsql_check
License: View license

#postgresql 

Veronica  Roob

Veronica Roob

1653475560

A Pure PHP Implementation Of The MessagePack Serialization Format

msgpack.php

A pure PHP implementation of the MessagePack serialization format.

Features

Installation

The recommended way to install the library is through Composer:

composer require rybakit/msgpack

Usage

Packing

To pack values you can either use an instance of a Packer:

$packer = new Packer();
$packed = $packer->pack($value);

or call a static method on the MessagePack class:

$packed = MessagePack::pack($value);

In the examples above, the method pack automatically packs a value depending on its type. However, not all PHP types can be uniquely translated to MessagePack types. For example, the MessagePack format defines map and array types, which are represented by a single array type in PHP. By default, the packer will pack a PHP array as a MessagePack array if it has sequential numeric keys, starting from 0 and as a MessagePack map otherwise:

$mpArr1 = $packer->pack([1, 2]);               // MP array [1, 2]
$mpArr2 = $packer->pack([0 => 1, 1 => 2]);     // MP array [1, 2]
$mpMap1 = $packer->pack([0 => 1, 2 => 3]);     // MP map {0: 1, 2: 3}
$mpMap2 = $packer->pack([1 => 2, 2 => 3]);     // MP map {1: 2, 2: 3}
$mpMap3 = $packer->pack(['a' => 1, 'b' => 2]); // MP map {a: 1, b: 2}

However, sometimes you need to pack a sequential array as a MessagePack map. To do this, use the packMap method:

$mpMap = $packer->packMap([1, 2]); // {0: 1, 1: 2}

Here is a list of type-specific packing methods:

$packer->packNil();           // MP nil
$packer->packBool(true);      // MP bool
$packer->packInt(42);         // MP int
$packer->packFloat(M_PI);     // MP float (32 or 64)
$packer->packFloat32(M_PI);   // MP float 32
$packer->packFloat64(M_PI);   // MP float 64
$packer->packStr('foo');      // MP str
$packer->packBin("\x80");     // MP bin
$packer->packArray([1, 2]);   // MP array
$packer->packMap(['a' => 1]); // MP map
$packer->packExt(1, "\xaa");  // MP ext

Check the "Custom types" section below on how to pack custom types.

Packing options

The Packer object supports a number of bitmask-based options for fine-tuning the packing process (defaults are in bold):

NameDescription
FORCE_STRForces PHP strings to be packed as MessagePack UTF-8 strings
FORCE_BINForces PHP strings to be packed as MessagePack binary data
DETECT_STR_BINDetects MessagePack str/bin type automatically
  
FORCE_ARRForces PHP arrays to be packed as MessagePack arrays
FORCE_MAPForces PHP arrays to be packed as MessagePack maps
DETECT_ARR_MAPDetects MessagePack array/map type automatically
  
FORCE_FLOAT32Forces PHP floats to be packed as 32-bits MessagePack floats
FORCE_FLOAT64Forces PHP floats to be packed as 64-bits MessagePack floats

The type detection mode (DETECT_STR_BIN/DETECT_ARR_MAP) adds some overhead which can be noticed when you pack large (16- and 32-bit) arrays or strings. However, if you know the value type in advance (for example, you only work with UTF-8 strings or/and associative arrays), you can eliminate this overhead by forcing the packer to use the appropriate type, which will save it from running the auto-detection routine. Another option is to explicitly specify the value type. The library provides 2 auxiliary classes for this, Map and Bin. Check the "Custom types" section below for details.

Examples:

// detect str/bin type and pack PHP 64-bit floats (doubles) to MP 32-bit floats
$packer = new Packer(PackOptions::DETECT_STR_BIN | PackOptions::FORCE_FLOAT32);

// these will throw MessagePack\Exception\InvalidOptionException
$packer = new Packer(PackOptions::FORCE_STR | PackOptions::FORCE_BIN);
$packer = new Packer(PackOptions::FORCE_FLOAT32 | PackOptions::FORCE_FLOAT64);

Unpacking

To unpack data you can either use an instance of a BufferUnpacker:

$unpacker = new BufferUnpacker();

$unpacker->reset($packed);
$value = $unpacker->unpack();

or call a static method on the MessagePack class:

$value = MessagePack::unpack($packed);

If the packed data is received in chunks (e.g. when reading from a stream), use the tryUnpack method, which attempts to unpack data and returns an array of unpacked messages (if any) instead of throwing an InsufficientDataException:

while ($chunk = ...) {
    $unpacker->append($chunk);
    if ($messages = $unpacker->tryUnpack()) {
        return $messages;
    }
}

If you want to unpack from a specific position in a buffer, use seek:

$unpacker->seek(42); // set position equal to 42 bytes
$unpacker->seek(-8); // set position to 8 bytes before the end of the buffer

To skip bytes from the current position, use skip:

$unpacker->skip(10); // set position to 10 bytes ahead of the current position

To get the number of remaining (unread) bytes in the buffer:

$unreadBytesCount = $unpacker->getRemainingCount();

To check whether the buffer has unread data:

$hasUnreadBytes = $unpacker->hasRemaining();

If needed, you can remove already read data from the buffer by calling:

$releasedBytesCount = $unpacker->release();

With the read method you can read raw (packed) data:

$packedData = $unpacker->read(2); // read 2 bytes

Besides the above methods BufferUnpacker provides type-specific unpacking methods, namely:

$unpacker->unpackNil();   // PHP null
$unpacker->unpackBool();  // PHP bool
$unpacker->unpackInt();   // PHP int
$unpacker->unpackFloat(); // PHP float
$unpacker->unpackStr();   // PHP UTF-8 string
$unpacker->unpackBin();   // PHP binary string
$unpacker->unpackArray(); // PHP sequential array
$unpacker->unpackMap();   // PHP associative array
$unpacker->unpackExt();   // PHP MessagePack\Type\Ext object

Unpacking options

The BufferUnpacker object supports a number of bitmask-based options for fine-tuning the unpacking process (defaults are in bold):

NameDescription
BIGINT_AS_STRConverts overflowed integers to strings [1]
BIGINT_AS_GMPConverts overflowed integers to GMP objects [2]
BIGINT_AS_DECConverts overflowed integers to Decimal\Decimal objects [3]

1. The binary MessagePack format has unsigned 64-bit as its largest integer data type, but PHP does not support such integers, which means that an overflow can occur during unpacking.

2. Make sure the GMP extension is enabled.

3. Make sure the Decimal extension is enabled.

Examples:

$packedUint64 = "\xcf"."\xff\xff\xff\xff"."\xff\xff\xff\xff";

$unpacker = new BufferUnpacker($packedUint64);
var_dump($unpacker->unpack()); // string(20) "18446744073709551615"

$unpacker = new BufferUnpacker($packedUint64, UnpackOptions::BIGINT_AS_GMP);
var_dump($unpacker->unpack()); // object(GMP) {...}

$unpacker = new BufferUnpacker($packedUint64, UnpackOptions::BIGINT_AS_DEC);
var_dump($unpacker->unpack()); // object(Decimal\Decimal) {...}

Custom types

In addition to the basic types, the library provides functionality to serialize and deserialize arbitrary types. This can be done in several ways, depending on your use case. Let's take a look at them.

Type objects

If you need to serialize an instance of one of your classes into one of the basic MessagePack types, the best way to do this is to implement the CanBePacked interface in the class. A good example of such a class is the Map type class that comes with the library. This type is useful when you want to explicitly specify that a given PHP array should be packed as a MessagePack map without triggering an automatic type detection routine:

$packer = new Packer();

$packedMap = $packer->pack(new Map([1, 2, 3]));
$packedArray = $packer->pack([1, 2, 3]);

More type examples can be found in the src/Type directory.

Type transformers

As with type objects, type transformers are only responsible for serializing values. They should be used when you need to serialize a value that does not implement the CanBePacked interface. Examples of such values could be instances of built-in or third-party classes that you don't own, or non-objects such as resources.

A transformer class must implement the CanPack interface. To use a transformer, it must first be registered in the packer. Here is an example of how to serialize PHP streams into the MessagePack bin format type using one of the supplied transformers, StreamTransformer:

$packer = new Packer(null, [new StreamTransformer()]);

$packedBin = $packer->pack(fopen('/path/to/file', 'r+'));

More type transformer examples can be found in the src/TypeTransformer directory.

Extensions

In contrast to the cases described above, extensions are intended to handle extension types and are responsible for both serialization and deserialization of values (types).

An extension class must implement the Extension interface. To use an extension, it must first be registered in the packer and the unpacker.

The MessagePack specification divides extension types into two groups: predefined and application-specific. Currently, there is only one predefined type in the specification, Timestamp.

Timestamp

The Timestamp extension type is a predefined type. Support for this type in the library is done through the TimestampExtension class. This class is responsible for handling Timestamp objects, which represent the number of seconds and optional adjustment in nanoseconds:

$timestampExtension = new TimestampExtension();

$packer = new Packer();
$packer = $packer->extendWith($timestampExtension);

$unpacker = new BufferUnpacker();
$unpacker = $unpacker->extendWith($timestampExtension);

$packedTimestamp = $packer->pack(Timestamp::now());
$timestamp = $unpacker->reset($packedTimestamp)->unpack();

$seconds = $timestamp->getSeconds();
$nanoseconds = $timestamp->getNanoseconds();

When using the MessagePack class, the Timestamp extension is already registered:

$packedTimestamp = MessagePack::pack(Timestamp::now());
$timestamp = MessagePack::unpack($packedTimestamp);

Application-specific extensions

In addition, the format can be extended with your own types. For example, to make the built-in PHP DateTime objects first-class citizens in your code, you can create a corresponding extension, as shown in the example. Please note, that custom extensions have to be registered with a unique extension ID (an integer from 0 to 127).

More extension examples can be found in the examples/MessagePack directory.

To learn more about how extension types can be useful, check out this article.

Exceptions

If an error occurs during packing/unpacking, a PackingFailedException or an UnpackingFailedException will be thrown, respectively. In addition, an InsufficientDataException can be thrown during unpacking.

An InvalidOptionException will be thrown in case an invalid option (or a combination of mutually exclusive options) is used.

Tests

Run tests as follows:

vendor/bin/phpunit

Also, if you already have Docker installed, you can run the tests in a docker container. First, create a container:

./dockerfile.sh | docker build -t msgpack -

The command above will create a container named msgpack with PHP 8.1 runtime. You may change the default runtime by defining the PHP_IMAGE environment variable:

PHP_IMAGE='php:8.0-cli' ./dockerfile.sh | docker build -t msgpack -

See a list of various images here.

Then run the unit tests:

docker run --rm -v $PWD:/msgpack -w /msgpack msgpack

Fuzzing

To ensure that the unpacking works correctly with malformed/semi-malformed data, you can use a testing technique called Fuzzing. The library ships with a help file (target) for PHP-Fuzzer and can be used as follows:

php-fuzzer fuzz tests/fuzz_buffer_unpacker.php

Performance

To check performance, run:

php -n -dzend_extension=opcache.so \
-dpcre.jit=1 -dopcache.enable=1 -dopcache.enable_cli=1 \
tests/bench.php

Example output

Filter: MessagePack\Tests\Perf\Filter\ListFilter
Rounds: 3
Iterations: 100000

=============================================
Test/Target            Packer  BufferUnpacker
---------------------------------------------
nil .................. 0.0030 ........ 0.0139
false ................ 0.0037 ........ 0.0144
true ................. 0.0040 ........ 0.0137
7-bit uint #1 ........ 0.0052 ........ 0.0120
7-bit uint #2 ........ 0.0059 ........ 0.0114
7-bit uint #3 ........ 0.0061 ........ 0.0119
5-bit sint #1 ........ 0.0067 ........ 0.0126
5-bit sint #2 ........ 0.0064 ........ 0.0132
5-bit sint #3 ........ 0.0066 ........ 0.0135
8-bit uint #1 ........ 0.0078 ........ 0.0200
8-bit uint #2 ........ 0.0077 ........ 0.0212
8-bit uint #3 ........ 0.0086 ........ 0.0203
16-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0111 ........ 0.0271
16-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0115 ........ 0.0260
16-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0103 ........ 0.0273
32-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0116 ........ 0.0326
32-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0118 ........ 0.0332
32-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0127 ........ 0.0325
64-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0140 ........ 0.0277
64-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0134 ........ 0.0294
64-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0134 ........ 0.0281
8-bit int #1 ......... 0.0086 ........ 0.0241
8-bit int #2 ......... 0.0089 ........ 0.0225
8-bit int #3 ......... 0.0085 ........ 0.0229
16-bit int #1 ........ 0.0118 ........ 0.0280
16-bit int #2 ........ 0.0121 ........ 0.0270
16-bit int #3 ........ 0.0109 ........ 0.0274
32-bit int #1 ........ 0.0128 ........ 0.0346
32-bit int #2 ........ 0.0118 ........ 0.0339
32-bit int #3 ........ 0.0135 ........ 0.0368
64-bit int #1 ........ 0.0138 ........ 0.0276
64-bit int #2 ........ 0.0132 ........ 0.0286
64-bit int #3 ........ 0.0137 ........ 0.0274
64-bit int #4 ........ 0.0180 ........ 0.0285
64-bit float #1 ...... 0.0134 ........ 0.0284
64-bit float #2 ...... 0.0125 ........ 0.0275
64-bit float #3 ...... 0.0126 ........ 0.0283
fix string #1 ........ 0.0035 ........ 0.0133
fix string #2 ........ 0.0094 ........ 0.0216
fix string #3 ........ 0.0094 ........ 0.0222
fix string #4 ........ 0.0091 ........ 0.0241
8-bit string #1 ...... 0.0122 ........ 0.0301
8-bit string #2 ...... 0.0118 ........ 0.0304
8-bit string #3 ...... 0.0119 ........ 0.0315
16-bit string #1 ..... 0.0150 ........ 0.0388
16-bit string #2 ..... 0.1545 ........ 0.1665
32-bit string ........ 0.1570 ........ 0.1756
wide char string #1 .. 0.0091 ........ 0.0236
wide char string #2 .. 0.0122 ........ 0.0313
8-bit binary #1 ...... 0.0100 ........ 0.0302
8-bit binary #2 ...... 0.0123 ........ 0.0324
8-bit binary #3 ...... 0.0126 ........ 0.0327
16-bit binary ........ 0.0168 ........ 0.0372
32-bit binary ........ 0.1588 ........ 0.1754
fix array #1 ......... 0.0042 ........ 0.0131
fix array #2 ......... 0.0294 ........ 0.0367
fix array #3 ......... 0.0412 ........ 0.0472
16-bit array #1 ...... 0.1378 ........ 0.1596
16-bit array #2 ........... S ............. S
32-bit array .............. S ............. S
complex array ........ 0.1865 ........ 0.2283
fix map #1 ........... 0.0725 ........ 0.1048
fix map #2 ........... 0.0319 ........ 0.0405
fix map #3 ........... 0.0356 ........ 0.0665
fix map #4 ........... 0.0465 ........ 0.0497
16-bit map #1 ........ 0.2540 ........ 0.3028
16-bit map #2 ............. S ............. S
32-bit map ................ S ............. S
complex map .......... 0.2372 ........ 0.2710
fixext 1 ............. 0.0283 ........ 0.0358
fixext 2 ............. 0.0291 ........ 0.0371
fixext 4 ............. 0.0302 ........ 0.0355
fixext 8 ............. 0.0288 ........ 0.0384
fixext 16 ............ 0.0293 ........ 0.0359
8-bit ext ............ 0.0302 ........ 0.0439
16-bit ext ........... 0.0334 ........ 0.0499
32-bit ext ........... 0.1845 ........ 0.1888
32-bit timestamp #1 .. 0.0337 ........ 0.0547
32-bit timestamp #2 .. 0.0335 ........ 0.0560
64-bit timestamp #1 .. 0.0371 ........ 0.0575
64-bit timestamp #2 .. 0.0374 ........ 0.0542
64-bit timestamp #3 .. 0.0356 ........ 0.0533
96-bit timestamp #1 .. 0.0362 ........ 0.0699
96-bit timestamp #2 .. 0.0381 ........ 0.0701
96-bit timestamp #3 .. 0.0367 ........ 0.0687
=============================================
Total                  2.7618          4.0820
Skipped                     4               4
Failed                      0               0
Ignored                     0               0

With JIT:

php -n -dzend_extension=opcache.so \
-dpcre.jit=1 -dopcache.jit_buffer_size=64M -dopcache.jit=tracing -dopcache.enable=1 -dopcache.enable_cli=1 \
tests/bench.php

Example output

Filter: MessagePack\Tests\Perf\Filter\ListFilter
Rounds: 3
Iterations: 100000

=============================================
Test/Target            Packer  BufferUnpacker
---------------------------------------------
nil .................. 0.0005 ........ 0.0054
false ................ 0.0004 ........ 0.0059
true ................. 0.0004 ........ 0.0059
7-bit uint #1 ........ 0.0010 ........ 0.0047
7-bit uint #2 ........ 0.0010 ........ 0.0046
7-bit uint #3 ........ 0.0010 ........ 0.0046
5-bit sint #1 ........ 0.0025 ........ 0.0046
5-bit sint #2 ........ 0.0023 ........ 0.0046
5-bit sint #3 ........ 0.0024 ........ 0.0045
8-bit uint #1 ........ 0.0043 ........ 0.0081
8-bit uint #2 ........ 0.0043 ........ 0.0079
8-bit uint #3 ........ 0.0041 ........ 0.0080
16-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0064 ........ 0.0095
16-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0064 ........ 0.0091
16-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0064 ........ 0.0094
32-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0085 ........ 0.0114
32-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0077 ........ 0.0122
32-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0077 ........ 0.0120
64-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0085 ........ 0.0159
64-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0086 ........ 0.0157
64-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0086 ........ 0.0158
8-bit int #1 ......... 0.0042 ........ 0.0080
8-bit int #2 ......... 0.0042 ........ 0.0080
8-bit int #3 ......... 0.0042 ........ 0.0081
16-bit int #1 ........ 0.0065 ........ 0.0095
16-bit int #2 ........ 0.0065 ........ 0.0090
16-bit int #3 ........ 0.0056 ........ 0.0085
32-bit int #1 ........ 0.0067 ........ 0.0107
32-bit int #2 ........ 0.0066 ........ 0.0106
32-bit int #3 ........ 0.0063 ........ 0.0104
64-bit int #1 ........ 0.0072 ........ 0.0162
64-bit int #2 ........ 0.0073 ........ 0.0174
64-bit int #3 ........ 0.0072 ........ 0.0164
64-bit int #4 ........ 0.0077 ........ 0.0161
64-bit float #1 ...... 0.0053 ........ 0.0135
64-bit float #2 ...... 0.0053 ........ 0.0135
64-bit float #3 ...... 0.0052 ........ 0.0135
fix string #1 ....... -0.0002 ........ 0.0044
fix string #2 ........ 0.0035 ........ 0.0067
fix string #3 ........ 0.0035 ........ 0.0077
fix string #4 ........ 0.0033 ........ 0.0078
8-bit string #1 ...... 0.0059 ........ 0.0110
8-bit string #2 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0121
8-bit string #3 ...... 0.0064 ........ 0.0124
16-bit string #1 ..... 0.0099 ........ 0.0146
16-bit string #2 ..... 0.1522 ........ 0.1474
32-bit string ........ 0.1511 ........ 0.1483
wide char string #1 .. 0.0039 ........ 0.0084
wide char string #2 .. 0.0073 ........ 0.0123
8-bit binary #1 ...... 0.0040 ........ 0.0112
8-bit binary #2 ...... 0.0075 ........ 0.0123
8-bit binary #3 ...... 0.0077 ........ 0.0129
16-bit binary ........ 0.0096 ........ 0.0145
32-bit binary ........ 0.1535 ........ 0.1479
fix array #1 ......... 0.0008 ........ 0.0061
fix array #2 ......... 0.0121 ........ 0.0165
fix array #3 ......... 0.0193 ........ 0.0222
16-bit array #1 ...... 0.0607 ........ 0.0479
16-bit array #2 ........... S ............. S
32-bit array .............. S ............. S
complex array ........ 0.0749 ........ 0.0824
fix map #1 ........... 0.0329 ........ 0.0431
fix map #2 ........... 0.0161 ........ 0.0189
fix map #3 ........... 0.0205 ........ 0.0262
fix map #4 ........... 0.0252 ........ 0.0205
16-bit map #1 ........ 0.1016 ........ 0.0927
16-bit map #2 ............. S ............. S
32-bit map ................ S ............. S
complex map .......... 0.1096 ........ 0.1030
fixext 1 ............. 0.0157 ........ 0.0161
fixext 2 ............. 0.0175 ........ 0.0183
fixext 4 ............. 0.0156 ........ 0.0185
fixext 8 ............. 0.0163 ........ 0.0184
fixext 16 ............ 0.0164 ........ 0.0182
8-bit ext ............ 0.0158 ........ 0.0207
16-bit ext ........... 0.0203 ........ 0.0219
32-bit ext ........... 0.1614 ........ 0.1539
32-bit timestamp #1 .. 0.0195 ........ 0.0249
32-bit timestamp #2 .. 0.0188 ........ 0.0260
64-bit timestamp #1 .. 0.0207 ........ 0.0281
64-bit timestamp #2 .. 0.0212 ........ 0.0291
64-bit timestamp #3 .. 0.0207 ........ 0.0295
96-bit timestamp #1 .. 0.0222 ........ 0.0358
96-bit timestamp #2 .. 0.0228 ........ 0.0353
96-bit timestamp #3 .. 0.0210 ........ 0.0319
=============================================
Total                  1.6432          1.9674
Skipped                     4               4
Failed                      0               0
Ignored                     0               0

You may change default benchmark settings by defining the following environment variables:

NameDefault
MP_BENCH_TARGETSpure_p,pure_u, see a list of available targets
MP_BENCH_ITERATIONS100_000
MP_BENCH_DURATIONnot set
MP_BENCH_ROUNDS3
MP_BENCH_TESTS-@slow, see a list of available tests

For example:

export MP_BENCH_TARGETS=pure_p
export MP_BENCH_ITERATIONS=1000000
export MP_BENCH_ROUNDS=5
# a comma separated list of test names
export MP_BENCH_TESTS='complex array, complex map'
# or a group name
# export MP_BENCH_TESTS='-@slow' // @pecl_comp
# or a regexp
# export MP_BENCH_TESTS='/complex (array|map)/'

Another example, benchmarking both the library and the PECL extension:

MP_BENCH_TARGETS=pure_p,pure_u,pecl_p,pecl_u \
php -n -dextension=msgpack.so -dzend_extension=opcache.so \
-dpcre.jit=1 -dopcache.enable=1 -dopcache.enable_cli=1 \
tests/bench.php

Example output

Filter: MessagePack\Tests\Perf\Filter\ListFilter
Rounds: 3
Iterations: 100000

===========================================================================
Test/Target            Packer  BufferUnpacker  msgpack_pack  msgpack_unpack
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
nil .................. 0.0031 ........ 0.0141 ...... 0.0055 ........ 0.0064
false ................ 0.0039 ........ 0.0154 ...... 0.0056 ........ 0.0053
true ................. 0.0038 ........ 0.0139 ...... 0.0056 ........ 0.0044
7-bit uint #1 ........ 0.0061 ........ 0.0110 ...... 0.0059 ........ 0.0046
7-bit uint #2 ........ 0.0065 ........ 0.0119 ...... 0.0042 ........ 0.0029
7-bit uint #3 ........ 0.0054 ........ 0.0117 ...... 0.0045 ........ 0.0025
5-bit sint #1 ........ 0.0047 ........ 0.0103 ...... 0.0038 ........ 0.0022
5-bit sint #2 ........ 0.0048 ........ 0.0117 ...... 0.0038 ........ 0.0022
5-bit sint #3 ........ 0.0046 ........ 0.0102 ...... 0.0038 ........ 0.0023
8-bit uint #1 ........ 0.0063 ........ 0.0174 ...... 0.0039 ........ 0.0031
8-bit uint #2 ........ 0.0063 ........ 0.0167 ...... 0.0040 ........ 0.0029
8-bit uint #3 ........ 0.0063 ........ 0.0168 ...... 0.0039 ........ 0.0030
16-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0092 ........ 0.0222 ...... 0.0049 ........ 0.0030
16-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0096 ........ 0.0227 ...... 0.0042 ........ 0.0046
16-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0123 ........ 0.0274 ...... 0.0059 ........ 0.0051
32-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0136 ........ 0.0331 ...... 0.0060 ........ 0.0048
32-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0130 ........ 0.0336 ...... 0.0070 ........ 0.0048
32-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0127 ........ 0.0329 ...... 0.0051 ........ 0.0048
64-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0126 ........ 0.0268 ...... 0.0055 ........ 0.0049
64-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0135 ........ 0.0281 ...... 0.0052 ........ 0.0046
64-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0131 ........ 0.0274 ...... 0.0069 ........ 0.0044
8-bit int #1 ......... 0.0077 ........ 0.0236 ...... 0.0058 ........ 0.0044
8-bit int #2 ......... 0.0087 ........ 0.0244 ...... 0.0058 ........ 0.0048
8-bit int #3 ......... 0.0084 ........ 0.0241 ...... 0.0055 ........ 0.0049
16-bit int #1 ........ 0.0112 ........ 0.0271 ...... 0.0048 ........ 0.0045
16-bit int #2 ........ 0.0124 ........ 0.0292 ...... 0.0057 ........ 0.0049
16-bit int #3 ........ 0.0118 ........ 0.0270 ...... 0.0058 ........ 0.0050
32-bit int #1 ........ 0.0137 ........ 0.0366 ...... 0.0058 ........ 0.0051
32-bit int #2 ........ 0.0133 ........ 0.0366 ...... 0.0056 ........ 0.0049
32-bit int #3 ........ 0.0129 ........ 0.0350 ...... 0.0052 ........ 0.0048
64-bit int #1 ........ 0.0145 ........ 0.0254 ...... 0.0034 ........ 0.0025
64-bit int #2 ........ 0.0097 ........ 0.0214 ...... 0.0034 ........ 0.0025
64-bit int #3 ........ 0.0096 ........ 0.0287 ...... 0.0059 ........ 0.0050
64-bit int #4 ........ 0.0143 ........ 0.0277 ...... 0.0059 ........ 0.0046
64-bit float #1 ...... 0.0134 ........ 0.0281 ...... 0.0057 ........ 0.0052
64-bit float #2 ...... 0.0141 ........ 0.0281 ...... 0.0057 ........ 0.0050
64-bit float #3 ...... 0.0144 ........ 0.0282 ...... 0.0057 ........ 0.0050
fix string #1 ........ 0.0036 ........ 0.0143 ...... 0.0066 ........ 0.0053
fix string #2 ........ 0.0107 ........ 0.0222 ...... 0.0065 ........ 0.0068
fix string #3 ........ 0.0116 ........ 0.0245 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0069
fix string #4 ........ 0.0105 ........ 0.0253 ...... 0.0083 ........ 0.0077
8-bit string #1 ...... 0.0126 ........ 0.0318 ...... 0.0075 ........ 0.0088
8-bit string #2 ...... 0.0121 ........ 0.0295 ...... 0.0076 ........ 0.0086
8-bit string #3 ...... 0.0125 ........ 0.0293 ...... 0.0130 ........ 0.0093
16-bit string #1 ..... 0.0159 ........ 0.0368 ...... 0.0117 ........ 0.0086
16-bit string #2 ..... 0.1547 ........ 0.1686 ...... 0.1516 ........ 0.1373
32-bit string ........ 0.1558 ........ 0.1729 ...... 0.1511 ........ 0.1396
wide char string #1 .. 0.0098 ........ 0.0237 ...... 0.0066 ........ 0.0065
wide char string #2 .. 0.0128 ........ 0.0291 ...... 0.0061 ........ 0.0082
8-bit binary #1 ........... I ............. I ........... F ............. I
8-bit binary #2 ........... I ............. I ........... F ............. I
8-bit binary #3 ........... I ............. I ........... F ............. I
16-bit binary ............. I ............. I ........... F ............. I
32-bit binary ............. I ............. I ........... F ............. I
fix array #1 ......... 0.0040 ........ 0.0129 ...... 0.0120 ........ 0.0058
fix array #2 ......... 0.0279 ........ 0.0390 ...... 0.0143 ........ 0.0165
fix array #3 ......... 0.0415 ........ 0.0463 ...... 0.0162 ........ 0.0187
16-bit array #1 ...... 0.1349 ........ 0.1628 ...... 0.0334 ........ 0.0341
16-bit array #2 ........... S ............. S ........... S ............. S
32-bit array .............. S ............. S ........... S ............. S
complex array ............. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fix map #1 ................ I ............. I ........... F ............. I
fix map #2 ........... 0.0345 ........ 0.0391 ...... 0.0143 ........ 0.0168
fix map #3 ................ I ............. I ........... F ............. I
fix map #4 ........... 0.0459 ........ 0.0473 ...... 0.0151 ........ 0.0163
16-bit map #1 ........ 0.2518 ........ 0.2962 ...... 0.0400 ........ 0.0490
16-bit map #2 ............. S ............. S ........... S ............. S
32-bit map ................ S ............. S ........... S ............. S
complex map .......... 0.2380 ........ 0.2682 ...... 0.0545 ........ 0.0579
fixext 1 .................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fixext 2 .................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fixext 4 .................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fixext 8 .................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fixext 16 ................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
8-bit ext ................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
16-bit ext ................ I ............. I ........... F ............. F
32-bit ext ................ I ............. I ........... F ............. F
32-bit timestamp #1 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
32-bit timestamp #2 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
64-bit timestamp #1 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
64-bit timestamp #2 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
64-bit timestamp #3 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
96-bit timestamp #1 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
96-bit timestamp #2 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
96-bit timestamp #3 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
===========================================================================
Total                  1.5625          2.3866        0.7735          0.7243
Skipped                     4               4             4               4
Failed                      0               0            24              17
Ignored                    24              24             0               7

With JIT:

MP_BENCH_TARGETS=pure_p,pure_u,pecl_p,pecl_u \
php -n -dextension=msgpack.so -dzend_extension=opcache.so \
-dpcre.jit=1 -dopcache.jit_buffer_size=64M -dopcache.jit=tracing -dopcache.enable=1 -dopcache.enable_cli=1 \
tests/bench.php

Example output

Filter: MessagePack\Tests\Perf\Filter\ListFilter
Rounds: 3
Iterations: 100000

===========================================================================
Test/Target            Packer  BufferUnpacker  msgpack_pack  msgpack_unpack
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
nil .................. 0.0001 ........ 0.0052 ...... 0.0053 ........ 0.0042
false ................ 0.0007 ........ 0.0060 ...... 0.0057 ........ 0.0043
true ................. 0.0008 ........ 0.0060 ...... 0.0056 ........ 0.0041
7-bit uint #1 ........ 0.0031 ........ 0.0046 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0041
7-bit uint #2 ........ 0.0021 ........ 0.0043 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0041
7-bit uint #3 ........ 0.0022 ........ 0.0044 ...... 0.0061 ........ 0.0040
5-bit sint #1 ........ 0.0030 ........ 0.0048 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0040
5-bit sint #2 ........ 0.0032 ........ 0.0046 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0040
5-bit sint #3 ........ 0.0031 ........ 0.0046 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0040
8-bit uint #1 ........ 0.0054 ........ 0.0079 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0050
8-bit uint #2 ........ 0.0051 ........ 0.0079 ...... 0.0064 ........ 0.0044
8-bit uint #3 ........ 0.0051 ........ 0.0082 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0044
16-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0077 ........ 0.0094 ...... 0.0065 ........ 0.0045
16-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0077 ........ 0.0094 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0045
16-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0077 ........ 0.0095 ...... 0.0064 ........ 0.0047
32-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0088 ........ 0.0119 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0043
32-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0089 ........ 0.0117 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0039
32-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0089 ........ 0.0118 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0044
64-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0097 ........ 0.0155 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0045
64-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0095 ........ 0.0153 ...... 0.0061 ........ 0.0045
64-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0096 ........ 0.0156 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0047
8-bit int #1 ......... 0.0053 ........ 0.0083 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0044
8-bit int #2 ......... 0.0052 ........ 0.0080 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0044
8-bit int #3 ......... 0.0052 ........ 0.0080 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0043
16-bit int #1 ........ 0.0089 ........ 0.0097 ...... 0.0069 ........ 0.0046
16-bit int #2 ........ 0.0075 ........ 0.0093 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0043
16-bit int #3 ........ 0.0075 ........ 0.0094 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0046
32-bit int #1 ........ 0.0086 ........ 0.0122 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0044
32-bit int #2 ........ 0.0087 ........ 0.0120 ...... 0.0066 ........ 0.0046
32-bit int #3 ........ 0.0086 ........ 0.0121 ...... 0.0060 ........ 0.0044
64-bit int #1 ........ 0.0096 ........ 0.0149 ...... 0.0060 ........ 0.0045
64-bit int #2 ........ 0.0096 ........ 0.0157 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0044
64-bit int #3 ........ 0.0096 ........ 0.0160 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0046
64-bit int #4 ........ 0.0097 ........ 0.0157 ...... 0.0061 ........ 0.0044
64-bit float #1 ...... 0.0079 ........ 0.0153 ...... 0.0056 ........ 0.0044
64-bit float #2 ...... 0.0079 ........ 0.0152 ...... 0.0057 ........ 0.0045
64-bit float #3 ...... 0.0079 ........ 0.0155 ...... 0.0057 ........ 0.0044
fix string #1 ........ 0.0010 ........ 0.0045 ...... 0.0071 ........ 0.0044
fix string #2 ........ 0.0048 ........ 0.0075 ...... 0.0070 ........ 0.0060
fix string #3 ........ 0.0048 ........ 0.0086 ...... 0.0068 ........ 0.0060
fix string #4 ........ 0.0050 ........ 0.0088 ...... 0.0070 ........ 0.0059
8-bit string #1 ...... 0.0081 ........ 0.0129 ...... 0.0069 ........ 0.0062
8-bit string #2 ...... 0.0086 ........ 0.0128 ...... 0.0069 ........ 0.0065
8-bit string #3 ...... 0.0086 ........ 0.0126 ...... 0.0115 ........ 0.0065
16-bit string #1 ..... 0.0105 ........ 0.0137 ...... 0.0128 ........ 0.0068
16-bit string #2 ..... 0.1510 ........ 0.1486 ...... 0.1526 ........ 0.1391
32-bit string ........ 0.1517 ........ 0.1475 ...... 0.1504 ........ 0.1370
wide char string #1 .. 0.0044 ........ 0.0085 ...... 0.0067 ........ 0.0057
wide char string #2 .. 0.0081 ........ 0.0125 ...... 0.0069 ........ 0.0063
8-bit binary #1 ........... I ............. I ........... F ............. I
8-bit binary #2 ........... I ............. I ........... F ............. I
8-bit binary #3 ........... I ............. I ........... F ............. I
16-bit binary ............. I ............. I ........... F ............. I
32-bit binary ............. I ............. I ........... F ............. I
fix array #1 ......... 0.0014 ........ 0.0059 ...... 0.0132 ........ 0.0055
fix array #2 ......... 0.0146 ........ 0.0156 ...... 0.0155 ........ 0.0148
fix array #3 ......... 0.0211 ........ 0.0229 ...... 0.0179 ........ 0.0180
16-bit array #1 ...... 0.0673 ........ 0.0498 ...... 0.0343 ........ 0.0388
16-bit array #2 ........... S ............. S ........... S ............. S
32-bit array .............. S ............. S ........... S ............. S
complex array ............. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fix map #1 ................ I ............. I ........... F ............. I
fix map #2 ........... 0.0148 ........ 0.0180 ...... 0.0156 ........ 0.0179
fix map #3 ................ I ............. I ........... F ............. I
fix map #4 ........... 0.0252 ........ 0.0201 ...... 0.0214 ........ 0.0167
16-bit map #1 ........ 0.1027 ........ 0.0836 ...... 0.0388 ........ 0.0510
16-bit map #2 ............. S ............. S ........... S ............. S
32-bit map ................ S ............. S ........... S ............. S
complex map .......... 0.1104 ........ 0.1010 ...... 0.0556 ........ 0.0602
fixext 1 .................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fixext 2 .................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fixext 4 .................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fixext 8 .................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fixext 16 ................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
8-bit ext ................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
16-bit ext ................ I ............. I ........... F ............. F
32-bit ext ................ I ............. I ........... F ............. F
32-bit timestamp #1 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
32-bit timestamp #2 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
64-bit timestamp #1 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
64-bit timestamp #2 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
64-bit timestamp #3 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
96-bit timestamp #1 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
96-bit timestamp #2 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
96-bit timestamp #3 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
===========================================================================
Total                  0.9642          1.0909        0.8224          0.7213
Skipped                     4               4             4               4
Failed                      0               0            24              17
Ignored                    24              24             0               7

Note that the msgpack extension (v2.1.2) doesn't support ext, bin and UTF-8 str types.

License

The library is released under the MIT License. See the bundled LICENSE file for details.

Author: rybakit
Source Code: https://github.com/rybakit/msgpack.php
License: MIT License

#php 

sophia tondon

sophia tondon

1620898103

5 Latest Technology Trends of Machine Learning for 2021

Check out the 5 latest technologies of machine learning trends to boost business growth in 2021 by considering the best version of digital development tools. It is the right time to accelerate user experience by bringing advancement in their lifestyle.

#machinelearningapps #machinelearningdevelopers #machinelearningexpert #machinelearningexperts #expertmachinelearningservices #topmachinelearningcompanies #machinelearningdevelopmentcompany

Visit Blog- https://www.xplace.com/article/8743

#machine learning companies #top machine learning companies #machine learning development company #expert machine learning services #machine learning experts #machine learning expert

Tia  Gottlieb

Tia Gottlieb

1596336480

Beginners Guide to Machine Learning on GCP

Introduction to Machine Learning

  • Machine Learning is a way to use some set of algorithms to derive predictive analytics from data. It is different than Business Intelligence and Data Analytics in a sense that In BI and Data analytics Businesses make decision based on historical data, but In case of Machine Learning , Businesses predict the future based on the historical data. Example, It’s a difference between what happened to the business vs what will happen to the business.Its like making BI much smarter and scalable so that it can predict future rather than just showing the state of the business.
  • **ML is based on Standard algorithms which are used to create use case specific model based on the data **. For example we can build the model to predict delivery time of the food, or we can build the model to predict the Delinquency rate in Finance business , but to build these model algorithm might be similar but the training would be different.Model training requires tones of examples (data).
  • Basically you train your standard algorithm with your Input data. So algorithms are always same but trained models are different based on use cases. Your trained model will be as good as your data.

ML, AI , Deep learning ? What is the difference?

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ML is type of AI

AI is a discipline , Machine Learning is tool set to achieve AI. DL is type of ML when data is unstructured like image, speech , video etc.

Barrier to Entry Has Fallen

AI & ML was daunting and with high barrier to entry until cloud become more robust and natural AI platform. Entry barrier to AI & ML has fallen significantly due to

  • Increasing availability in data (big data).
  • Increase in sophistication in algorithm.
  • And availability of hardware and software due to cloud computing.

GCP Machine Learning Spectrum

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  • For Data scientist and ML experts , TensorFlow on AI platform is more natural choice since they will build their own custom ML models.
  • But for the users who are not experts will potentially use Cloud AutoML or Pre-trained ready to go model.
  • In case of AutoML we can trained our custom model with Google taking care of much of the operational tasks.
  • Pre-trained models are the one which are already trained with tones of data and ready to be used by users to predict on their test data.

Prebuilt ML Models (No ML Expertise Needed)

  • As discuss earlier , GCP has lot of Prebuilt models that are ready to use to solve common ML task . Such as image classification, Sentiment analysis.
  • Most of the businesses are having many unstructured data sources such as e-mail, logs, web pages, ppt, documents, chat, comments etc.( 90% or more as per various studies)
  • Now to process these unstructured data in the form of text, we should use Cloud Natural Language API.
  • Similarly For common ML problems in the form of speech, video, vision we should use respective Prebuilt models.

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