Donato  Roob

Donato Roob

1614684180

Porting Firefox to Apple Silicon

The release of Apple Silicon-based Macs at the end of last year generated a flurry of news coverage and some surprises at the machine’s performance. This post details some background information on the experience of porting Firefox to run natively on these CPUs.

We’ll start with some background on the Mac transition and give an overview of Firefox internals that needed to know about the new architecture, before moving on to the concept of Universal Binaries.

We’ll then explain how DRM/EME works on the new platform, talk about our experience with macOS Big Sur, and discuss various updater problems we had to deal with. We’ll conclude with the release and an overview of various other improvements that are in the pipeline.

Apple Silicon Approaching

Speculation that Apple would switch its Mac lineup to use ARM CPUs had been ongoing in the industry for several years. As early as 2013, Apple had referred to the custom ARM chips they were putting in the iPhone as “desktop-class” designs.

While the claim initially met some scepticism, near the end of 2018 computer hardware magazine AnandTech published the results of running the industry-standard SPEC benchmark on the iPhone XS, showing that even workloads that reflect real-world desktop use cases reached desktop chip performance, and were doing so at significantly better power efficiency. This provided us with some warning that Apple might be ready to start the transition to the ARM architecture in the near future.

#firefox #rust #apple #firefox #rust

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Porting Firefox to Apple Silicon
Carmen  Grimes

Carmen Grimes

1603280160

Coming through with Firefox 82 – Mozilla Hacks

As October ushers in the tail-end of the year, we are pushing Firefox 82 out the door. This time around we finally enable support for the Media Session API, provide some new CSS pseudo-selector behaviours, close some security loopholes involving the Window.name property, and provide inspection for server-sent events in our developer tools.

This blog post provides merely a set of highlights; for all the details, check out the following:

Inspecting server-sent events

Server-sent events allow for an inversion of the traditional client-initiated web request model, with a server sending new data to a web page at any time by pushing messages. In this release we’ve added the ability to inspect server-sent events and their message contents using the Network Monitor.

You can go to the Network Monitor, select the file that is sending the server-sent events, and view the received messages in the Response tab on the right-hand panel.

For more information, check out our Inspecting server-sent events guide.

Web platform updates

Now let’s look at the web platform additions we’ve got in store in 82.

Media Session API

The Media Session API enables two main sets of functionality:

  1. First of all, it provides a way to customize media notifications. It does this by providing metadata for display by the operating system for the media your web app is playing.
  2. Second, it provides event handlers that the browser can use to access platform media keys such as hardware keys found on keyboards, headsets, remote controls, and software keys found in notification areas and on lock screens of mobile devices. So you can seamlessly control web-provided media via your device, even when not looking at the web page.

#developer tools #featured article #firefox #firefox releases #css #firefox #firefox 82 #firefox developer edition #firefox release #web extensions

Donato  Roob

Donato Roob

1614684180

Porting Firefox to Apple Silicon

The release of Apple Silicon-based Macs at the end of last year generated a flurry of news coverage and some surprises at the machine’s performance. This post details some background information on the experience of porting Firefox to run natively on these CPUs.

We’ll start with some background on the Mac transition and give an overview of Firefox internals that needed to know about the new architecture, before moving on to the concept of Universal Binaries.

We’ll then explain how DRM/EME works on the new platform, talk about our experience with macOS Big Sur, and discuss various updater problems we had to deal with. We’ll conclude with the release and an overview of various other improvements that are in the pipeline.

Apple Silicon Approaching

Speculation that Apple would switch its Mac lineup to use ARM CPUs had been ongoing in the industry for several years. As early as 2013, Apple had referred to the custom ARM chips they were putting in the iPhone as “desktop-class” designs.

While the claim initially met some scepticism, near the end of 2018 computer hardware magazine AnandTech published the results of running the industry-standard SPEC benchmark on the iPhone XS, showing that even workloads that reflect real-world desktop use cases reached desktop chip performance, and were doing so at significantly better power efficiency. This provided us with some warning that Apple might be ready to start the transition to the ARM architecture in the near future.

#firefox #rust #apple #firefox #rust

Donato  Roob

Donato Roob

1614283740

Porting Firefox to Apple Silicon

The release of Apple Silicon-based Macs at the end of last year generated a flurry of news coverage and some surprises at the machine’s performance. This post details some background information on the experience of porting Firefox to run natively on these CPUs.

We’ll start with some background on the Mac transition and give an overview of Firefox internals that needed to know about the new architecture, before moving on to the concept of Universal Binaries.

We’ll then explain how DRM/EME works on the new platform, talk about our experience with macOS Big Sur, and discuss various updater problems we had to deal with. We’ll conclude with the release and an overview of various other improvements that are in the pipeline.

Apple Silicon Approaching

Speculation that Apple would switch its Mac lineup to use ARM CPUs had been ongoing in the industry for several years. As early as 2013, Apple had referred to the custom ARM chips they were putting in the iPhone as “desktop-class” designs.

While the claim initially met some scepticism, near the end of 2018 computer hardware magazine AnandTech published the results of running the industry-standard SPEC benchmark on the iPhone XS, showing that even workloads that reflect real-world desktop use cases reached desktop chip performance, and were doing so at significantly better power efficiency. This provided us with some warning that Apple might be ready to start the transition to the ARM architecture in the near future.

From the perspective of Mozillla’s platform team, an area of particular interest for such an architecture change on macOS is Firefox’s use of macOS APIs. Firefox and Gecko’s roots go back to the Netscape codebase, which already supported the Mac as it was in 1994.

Although continuously updated, Firefox still uses a wide range of macOS APIs that followed the Mac’s evolution over the years (Carbon, Cocoa, HITheme, Quartz, …).

Apple has generally kept them — the code is there and working, after all — and has even added compatibility shims in some places where behavior has changed. But they’re not willing to keep compatibility forever, and in fact had removed 32-bit support in the previous macOS Catalina which had an impact on applications that were relying on this, among them many games.

As such, we were concerned that not all APIs would still be supported on the new architecture and we’d have to go in and rewrite some amount of widget, toolkit or theming code in short order.

Based on the performance from the aforementioned benchmarks and Apple’s historical release schedule, the platform team estimated in March that “macOS 10.16” was likely to appear around September or October 2020 and that there was a significant risk it could involve API changes in order to add ARM support, which we took into account in our planning.

#firefox #rust #apple

Debugging Variables With Watchpoints in Firefox 72

The Firefox Devtools team, along with our community of code contributors, have been working hard to pack Firefox 72 full of improvements. This post introduces the watchpoints feature that’s available right now in Firefox Developer Edition! Keep reading to get up to speed on watchpoints and how to use them.

#debugging #developer tools #featured article #firefox #firefox releases #breakpoints #debugger #debugger for firefox #firefox devtools #firefox visual studio code extension #watchpoints

Maria Smith

1623919962

How can I get a human at Apple to report problem?

**How Do I Report a Problem to Apple Customer Service?
**

There are times when you may find some issue with your Apple product however you rarely see an issue. You can report a problem if you want to. All you need is to perform a few simple steps and here are the steps that you should perform. Go through them.

**How can I get human at Apple?
**

• First and foremost, you need to go to reportaproblem.apple.com.
• Next, you have to sign in to your Apple account by entering your Apple ID and Password.
• In case you see a Report or Report a Problem option next to the item in which you see a problem, click it.
• After that, you need to follow the onscreen instructions and select a reason why you want to report a problem.
• Lastly, you need to submit your request.

**How do you get through to Apple Support?
**

With this, you can report online for your Apple product. In case you want to contact Apple customer service to report a problem, you can do that in the given ways.

  1. Over a Phone Call - Dial the customer service phone number to get help for any problem that you see with your Apple account. Also, you can report the problem on a single phone call.
    You can speak to a human at Apple technical support: (800) APL–CARE (800–275–2273)
  2. Through Live Chat - By requesting a live chat, you will be in touch with a representative who will assist you thoroughly to report a problem that you see with your Apple account.
  3. Via Email - The most common way to report a problem on Apple is email. You can compose an email explaining the issue that you see with the service and report it. Once your email is received, the tech support team acknowledges the issue and provides you all information within the least possible time.

By choosing any of the desired ways to report a problem, you can complain about the issue to the tech support team (Apple customer service). Also, you will no longer wonder how to get a human at Apple support. The above information will help you in all manners and let you experience the hassle-free service of Apple. So, dial the number or send an email, but get help from the experts.

#how can i get a human at apple #how do i reach a human at apple? #how do i call apple support? #contact apple support #call apple support #apple's online support