Mail Builder: E-mail Builder Library for Rust

mail-builder

mail-builder is a flexible e-mail builder library written in Rust. It includes the following features:

  • Generates e-mail messages conforming to the Internet Message Format standard (RFC 5322).
  • Full MIME support (RFC 2045 - 2049) with automatic selection of the most optimal encoding for each message body part.
  • Fast Base64 encoding based on Chromium's decoder (the fastest non-SIMD encoder).
  • Minimal dependencies.

Please note that this library does not support sending or parsing e-mail messages as these functionalities are provided by the crates mail-send and mail-parser.

Usage Example

Build a simple e-mail message with a text body and one attachment:

    // Build a simple text message with a single attachment
    let eml = MessageBuilder::new()
        .from(("John Doe", "john@doe.com"))
        .to("jane@doe.com")
        .subject("Hello, world!")
        .text_body("Message contents go here.")
        .binary_attachment("image/png", "image.png", [1, 2, 3, 4].as_ref())
        .write_to_string()
        .unwrap();
        
    // Print raw message
    println!("{}", eml);

More complex messages with grouped addresses, inline parts and multipart/alternative sections can also be easily built:

    // Build a multipart message with text and HTML bodies,
    // inline parts and attachments.
    MessageBuilder::new()
        .from(("John Doe", "john@doe.com"))

        // To recipients
        .to(vec![
            ("Antoine de Saint-Exupéry", "antoine@exupery.com"),
            ("안녕하세요 세계", "test@test.com"),
            ("Xin chào", "addr@addr.com"),
        ])

        // BCC recipients using grouped addresses
        .bcc(vec![
            (
                "My Group",
                vec![
                    ("ASCII name", "addr1@addr7.com"),
                    ("ハロー・ワールド", "addr2@addr6.com"),
                    ("áéíóú", "addr3@addr5.com"),
                    ("Γειά σου Κόσμε", "addr4@addr4.com"),
                ],
            ),
            (
                "Another Group",
                vec![
                    ("שלום עולם", "addr5@addr3.com"),
                    ("ñandú come ñoquis", "addr6@addr2.com"),
                    ("Recipient", "addr7@addr1.com"),
                ],
            ),
        ])

        // Set RFC and custom headers
        .subject("Testing multipart messages") 
        .in_reply_to(vec!["message-id-1", "message-id-2"])
        .header("List-Archive", URL::new("http://example.com/archive"))

        // Set HTML and plain text bodies
        .text_body("This is the text body!\n") 
        .html_body("<p>HTML body with <img src=\"cid:my-image\"/>!</p>") 

        // Include an embedded image as an inline part
        .binary_inline("image/png", "cid:my-image", [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5].as_ref())
        .text_attachment("text/plain", "my fíle.txt", "Attachment contents go here.") 

        // Add text and binary attachments
        .binary_attachment(
            "text/plain",
            "ハロー・ワールド",
            b"Binary contents go here.".as_ref(),
        )

        // Write the message to a file
        .write_to(File::create("message.eml").unwrap())
        .unwrap();

Nested MIME body structures can be created using the body method:

    // Build a nested multipart message
    MessageBuilder::new()
        .from(Address::new_address("John Doe".into(), "john@doe.com"))
        .to(Address::new_address("Jane Doe".into(), "jane@doe.com"))
        .subject("Nested multipart message")

        // Define the nested MIME body structure
        .body(MimePart::new_multipart(
            "multipart/mixed",
            vec![
                MimePart::new_text("Part A contents go here...").inline(),
                MimePart::new_multipart(
                    "multipart/mixed",
                    vec![
                        MimePart::new_multipart(
                            "multipart/alternative",
                            vec![
                                MimePart::new_multipart(
                                    "multipart/mixed",
                                    vec![
                                        MimePart::new_text("Part B contents go here...").inline(),
                                        MimePart::new_binary(
                                            "image/jpeg",
                                            "Part C contents go here...".as_bytes(),
                                        )
                                        .inline(),
                                        MimePart::new_text("Part D contents go here...").inline(),
                                    ],
                                ),
                                MimePart::new_multipart(
                                    "multipart/related",
                                    vec![
                                        MimePart::new_html("Part E contents go here...").inline(),
                                        MimePart::new_binary(
                                            "image/jpeg",
                                            "Part F contents go here...".as_bytes(),
                                        ),
                                    ],
                                ),
                            ],
                        ),
                        MimePart::new_binary("image/jpeg", "Part G contents go here...".as_bytes())
                            .attachment("image_G.jpg"),
                        MimePart::new_binary(
                            "application/x-excel",
                            "Part H contents go here...".as_bytes(),
                        ),
                        MimePart::new_binary(
                            "x-message/rfc822",
                            "Part J contents go here...".as_bytes(),
                        ),
                    ],
                ),
                MimePart::new_text("Part K contents go here...").inline(),
            ],
        ))
        
        // Write the message to a file
        .write_to(File::create("nested-message.eml").unwrap())
        .unwrap();

Testing

To run the testsuite:

 $ cargo test --all-features

or, to run the testsuite with MIRI:

 $ cargo +nightly miri test --all-features

License

Licensed under either of

at your option.

Copyright

Copyright (C) 2020-2022, Stalwart Labs Ltd.

See COPYING for the license.


Download Details:

Author: stalwartlabs
Source Code: https://github.com/stalwartlabs/mail-builder

License: Apache-2.0, MIT licenses found

#rust 

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Mail Builder: E-mail Builder Library for Rust

Serde Rust: Serialization Framework for Rust

Serde

*Serde is a framework for serializing and deserializing Rust data structures efficiently and generically.*

You may be looking for:

Serde in action

Click to show Cargo.toml. Run this code in the playground.

[dependencies]

# The core APIs, including the Serialize and Deserialize traits. Always
# required when using Serde. The "derive" feature is only required when
# using #[derive(Serialize, Deserialize)] to make Serde work with structs
# and enums defined in your crate.
serde = { version = "1.0", features = ["derive"] }

# Each data format lives in its own crate; the sample code below uses JSON
# but you may be using a different one.
serde_json = "1.0"

 

use serde::{Serialize, Deserialize};

#[derive(Serialize, Deserialize, Debug)]
struct Point {
    x: i32,
    y: i32,
}

fn main() {
    let point = Point { x: 1, y: 2 };

    // Convert the Point to a JSON string.
    let serialized = serde_json::to_string(&point).unwrap();

    // Prints serialized = {"x":1,"y":2}
    println!("serialized = {}", serialized);

    // Convert the JSON string back to a Point.
    let deserialized: Point = serde_json::from_str(&serialized).unwrap();

    // Prints deserialized = Point { x: 1, y: 2 }
    println!("deserialized = {:?}", deserialized);
}

Getting help

Serde is one of the most widely used Rust libraries so any place that Rustaceans congregate will be able to help you out. For chat, consider trying the #rust-questions or #rust-beginners channels of the unofficial community Discord (invite: https://discord.gg/rust-lang-community), the #rust-usage or #beginners channels of the official Rust Project Discord (invite: https://discord.gg/rust-lang), or the #general stream in Zulip. For asynchronous, consider the [rust] tag on StackOverflow, the /r/rust subreddit which has a pinned weekly easy questions post, or the Rust Discourse forum. It's acceptable to file a support issue in this repo but they tend not to get as many eyes as any of the above and may get closed without a response after some time.

Download Details:
Author: serde-rs
Source Code: https://github.com/serde-rs/serde
License: View license

#rust  #rustlang 

Mail Builder: E-mail Builder Library for Rust

mail-builder

mail-builder is a flexible e-mail builder library written in Rust. It includes the following features:

  • Generates e-mail messages conforming to the Internet Message Format standard (RFC 5322).
  • Full MIME support (RFC 2045 - 2049) with automatic selection of the most optimal encoding for each message body part.
  • Fast Base64 encoding based on Chromium's decoder (the fastest non-SIMD encoder).
  • Minimal dependencies.

Please note that this library does not support sending or parsing e-mail messages as these functionalities are provided by the crates mail-send and mail-parser.

Usage Example

Build a simple e-mail message with a text body and one attachment:

    // Build a simple text message with a single attachment
    let eml = MessageBuilder::new()
        .from(("John Doe", "john@doe.com"))
        .to("jane@doe.com")
        .subject("Hello, world!")
        .text_body("Message contents go here.")
        .binary_attachment("image/png", "image.png", [1, 2, 3, 4].as_ref())
        .write_to_string()
        .unwrap();
        
    // Print raw message
    println!("{}", eml);

More complex messages with grouped addresses, inline parts and multipart/alternative sections can also be easily built:

    // Build a multipart message with text and HTML bodies,
    // inline parts and attachments.
    MessageBuilder::new()
        .from(("John Doe", "john@doe.com"))

        // To recipients
        .to(vec![
            ("Antoine de Saint-Exupéry", "antoine@exupery.com"),
            ("안녕하세요 세계", "test@test.com"),
            ("Xin chào", "addr@addr.com"),
        ])

        // BCC recipients using grouped addresses
        .bcc(vec![
            (
                "My Group",
                vec![
                    ("ASCII name", "addr1@addr7.com"),
                    ("ハロー・ワールド", "addr2@addr6.com"),
                    ("áéíóú", "addr3@addr5.com"),
                    ("Γειά σου Κόσμε", "addr4@addr4.com"),
                ],
            ),
            (
                "Another Group",
                vec![
                    ("שלום עולם", "addr5@addr3.com"),
                    ("ñandú come ñoquis", "addr6@addr2.com"),
                    ("Recipient", "addr7@addr1.com"),
                ],
            ),
        ])

        // Set RFC and custom headers
        .subject("Testing multipart messages") 
        .in_reply_to(vec!["message-id-1", "message-id-2"])
        .header("List-Archive", URL::new("http://example.com/archive"))

        // Set HTML and plain text bodies
        .text_body("This is the text body!\n") 
        .html_body("<p>HTML body with <img src=\"cid:my-image\"/>!</p>") 

        // Include an embedded image as an inline part
        .binary_inline("image/png", "cid:my-image", [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5].as_ref())
        .text_attachment("text/plain", "my fíle.txt", "Attachment contents go here.") 

        // Add text and binary attachments
        .binary_attachment(
            "text/plain",
            "ハロー・ワールド",
            b"Binary contents go here.".as_ref(),
        )

        // Write the message to a file
        .write_to(File::create("message.eml").unwrap())
        .unwrap();

Nested MIME body structures can be created using the body method:

    // Build a nested multipart message
    MessageBuilder::new()
        .from(Address::new_address("John Doe".into(), "john@doe.com"))
        .to(Address::new_address("Jane Doe".into(), "jane@doe.com"))
        .subject("Nested multipart message")

        // Define the nested MIME body structure
        .body(MimePart::new_multipart(
            "multipart/mixed",
            vec![
                MimePart::new_text("Part A contents go here...").inline(),
                MimePart::new_multipart(
                    "multipart/mixed",
                    vec![
                        MimePart::new_multipart(
                            "multipart/alternative",
                            vec![
                                MimePart::new_multipart(
                                    "multipart/mixed",
                                    vec![
                                        MimePart::new_text("Part B contents go here...").inline(),
                                        MimePart::new_binary(
                                            "image/jpeg",
                                            "Part C contents go here...".as_bytes(),
                                        )
                                        .inline(),
                                        MimePart::new_text("Part D contents go here...").inline(),
                                    ],
                                ),
                                MimePart::new_multipart(
                                    "multipart/related",
                                    vec![
                                        MimePart::new_html("Part E contents go here...").inline(),
                                        MimePart::new_binary(
                                            "image/jpeg",
                                            "Part F contents go here...".as_bytes(),
                                        ),
                                    ],
                                ),
                            ],
                        ),
                        MimePart::new_binary("image/jpeg", "Part G contents go here...".as_bytes())
                            .attachment("image_G.jpg"),
                        MimePart::new_binary(
                            "application/x-excel",
                            "Part H contents go here...".as_bytes(),
                        ),
                        MimePart::new_binary(
                            "x-message/rfc822",
                            "Part J contents go here...".as_bytes(),
                        ),
                    ],
                ),
                MimePart::new_text("Part K contents go here...").inline(),
            ],
        ))
        
        // Write the message to a file
        .write_to(File::create("nested-message.eml").unwrap())
        .unwrap();

Testing

To run the testsuite:

 $ cargo test --all-features

or, to run the testsuite with MIRI:

 $ cargo +nightly miri test --all-features

License

Licensed under either of

at your option.

Copyright

Copyright (C) 2020-2022, Stalwart Labs Ltd.

See COPYING for the license.


Download Details:

Author: stalwartlabs
Source Code: https://github.com/stalwartlabs/mail-builder

License: Apache-2.0, MIT licenses found

#rust 

Awesome  Rust

Awesome Rust

1654894080

Serde JSON: JSON Support for Serde Framework

Serde JSON

Serde is a framework for serializing and deserializing Rust data structures efficiently and generically.

[dependencies]
serde_json = "1.0"

You may be looking for:

JSON is a ubiquitous open-standard format that uses human-readable text to transmit data objects consisting of key-value pairs.

{
    "name": "John Doe",
    "age": 43,
    "address": {
        "street": "10 Downing Street",
        "city": "London"
    },
    "phones": [
        "+44 1234567",
        "+44 2345678"
    ]
}

There are three common ways that you might find yourself needing to work with JSON data in Rust.

  • As text data. An unprocessed string of JSON data that you receive on an HTTP endpoint, read from a file, or prepare to send to a remote server.
  • As an untyped or loosely typed representation. Maybe you want to check that some JSON data is valid before passing it on, but without knowing the structure of what it contains. Or you want to do very basic manipulations like insert a key in a particular spot.
  • As a strongly typed Rust data structure. When you expect all or most of your data to conform to a particular structure and want to get real work done without JSON's loosey-goosey nature tripping you up.

Serde JSON provides efficient, flexible, safe ways of converting data between each of these representations.

Operating on untyped JSON values

Any valid JSON data can be manipulated in the following recursive enum representation. This data structure is serde_json::Value.

enum Value {
    Null,
    Bool(bool),
    Number(Number),
    String(String),
    Array(Vec<Value>),
    Object(Map<String, Value>),
}

A string of JSON data can be parsed into a serde_json::Value by the serde_json::from_str function. There is also from_slice for parsing from a byte slice &[u8] and from_reader for parsing from any io::Read like a File or a TCP stream.

use serde_json::{Result, Value};

fn untyped_example() -> Result<()> {
    // Some JSON input data as a &str. Maybe this comes from the user.
    let data = r#"
        {
            "name": "John Doe",
            "age": 43,
            "phones": [
                "+44 1234567",
                "+44 2345678"
            ]
        }"#;

    // Parse the string of data into serde_json::Value.
    let v: Value = serde_json::from_str(data)?;

    // Access parts of the data by indexing with square brackets.
    println!("Please call {} at the number {}", v["name"], v["phones"][0]);

    Ok(())
}

The result of square bracket indexing like v["name"] is a borrow of the data at that index, so the type is &Value. A JSON map can be indexed with string keys, while a JSON array can be indexed with integer keys. If the type of the data is not right for the type with which it is being indexed, or if a map does not contain the key being indexed, or if the index into a vector is out of bounds, the returned element is Value::Null.

When a Value is printed, it is printed as a JSON string. So in the code above, the output looks like Please call "John Doe" at the number "+44 1234567". The quotation marks appear because v["name"] is a &Value containing a JSON string and its JSON representation is "John Doe". Printing as a plain string without quotation marks involves converting from a JSON string to a Rust string with as_str() or avoiding the use of Value as described in the following section.

The Value representation is sufficient for very basic tasks but can be tedious to work with for anything more significant. Error handling is verbose to implement correctly, for example imagine trying to detect the presence of unrecognized fields in the input data. The compiler is powerless to help you when you make a mistake, for example imagine typoing v["name"] as v["nmae"] in one of the dozens of places it is used in your code.

Parsing JSON as strongly typed data structures

Serde provides a powerful way of mapping JSON data into Rust data structures largely automatically.

use serde::{Deserialize, Serialize};
use serde_json::Result;

#[derive(Serialize, Deserialize)]
struct Person {
    name: String,
    age: u8,
    phones: Vec<String>,
}

fn typed_example() -> Result<()> {
    // Some JSON input data as a &str. Maybe this comes from the user.
    let data = r#"
        {
            "name": "John Doe",
            "age": 43,
            "phones": [
                "+44 1234567",
                "+44 2345678"
            ]
        }"#;

    // Parse the string of data into a Person object. This is exactly the
    // same function as the one that produced serde_json::Value above, but
    // now we are asking it for a Person as output.
    let p: Person = serde_json::from_str(data)?;

    // Do things just like with any other Rust data structure.
    println!("Please call {} at the number {}", p.name, p.phones[0]);

    Ok(())
}

This is the same serde_json::from_str function as before, but this time we assign the return value to a variable of type Person so Serde will automatically interpret the input data as a Person and produce informative error messages if the layout does not conform to what a Person is expected to look like.

Any type that implements Serde's Deserialize trait can be deserialized this way. This includes built-in Rust standard library types like Vec<T> and HashMap<K, V>, as well as any structs or enums annotated with #[derive(Deserialize)].

Once we have p of type Person, our IDE and the Rust compiler can help us use it correctly like they do for any other Rust code. The IDE can autocomplete field names to prevent typos, which was impossible in the serde_json::Value representation. And the Rust compiler can check that when we write p.phones[0], then p.phones is guaranteed to be a Vec<String> so indexing into it makes sense and produces a String.

The necessary setup for using Serde's derive macros is explained on the Using derive page of the Serde site.

Constructing JSON values

Serde JSON provides a json! macro to build serde_json::Value objects with very natural JSON syntax.

use serde_json::json;

fn main() {
    // The type of `john` is `serde_json::Value`
    let john = json!({
        "name": "John Doe",
        "age": 43,
        "phones": [
            "+44 1234567",
            "+44 2345678"
        ]
    });

    println!("first phone number: {}", john["phones"][0]);

    // Convert to a string of JSON and print it out
    println!("{}", john.to_string());
}

The Value::to_string() function converts a serde_json::Value into a String of JSON text.

One neat thing about the json! macro is that variables and expressions can be interpolated directly into the JSON value as you are building it. Serde will check at compile time that the value you are interpolating is able to be represented as JSON.

let full_name = "John Doe";
let age_last_year = 42;

// The type of `john` is `serde_json::Value`
let john = json!({
    "name": full_name,
    "age": age_last_year + 1,
    "phones": [
        format!("+44 {}", random_phone())
    ]
});

This is amazingly convenient, but we have the problem we had before with Value: the IDE and Rust compiler cannot help us if we get it wrong. Serde JSON provides a better way of serializing strongly-typed data structures into JSON text.

Creating JSON by serializing data structures

A data structure can be converted to a JSON string by serde_json::to_string. There is also serde_json::to_vec which serializes to a Vec<u8> and serde_json::to_writer which serializes to any io::Write such as a File or a TCP stream.

use serde::{Deserialize, Serialize};
use serde_json::Result;

#[derive(Serialize, Deserialize)]
struct Address {
    street: String,
    city: String,
}

fn print_an_address() -> Result<()> {
    // Some data structure.
    let address = Address {
        street: "10 Downing Street".to_owned(),
        city: "London".to_owned(),
    };

    // Serialize it to a JSON string.
    let j = serde_json::to_string(&address)?;

    // Print, write to a file, or send to an HTTP server.
    println!("{}", j);

    Ok(())
}

Any type that implements Serde's Serialize trait can be serialized this way. This includes built-in Rust standard library types like Vec<T> and HashMap<K, V>, as well as any structs or enums annotated with #[derive(Serialize)].

Performance

It is fast. You should expect in the ballpark of 500 to 1000 megabytes per second deserialization and 600 to 900 megabytes per second serialization, depending on the characteristics of your data. This is competitive with the fastest C and C++ JSON libraries or even 30% faster for many use cases. Benchmarks live in the serde-rs/json-benchmark repo.

Getting help

Serde is one of the most widely used Rust libraries, so any place that Rustaceans congregate will be able to help you out. For chat, consider trying the #rust-questions or #rust-beginners channels of the unofficial community Discord (invite: https://discord.gg/rust-lang-community), the #rust-usage or #beginners channels of the official Rust Project Discord (invite: https://discord.gg/rust-lang), or the #general stream in Zulip. For asynchronous, consider the [rust] tag on StackOverflow, the /r/rust subreddit which has a pinned weekly easy questions post, or the Rust Discourse forum. It's acceptable to file a support issue in this repo, but they tend not to get as many eyes as any of the above and may get closed without a response after some time.

No-std support

As long as there is a memory allocator, it is possible to use serde_json without the rest of the Rust standard library. This is supported on Rust 1.36+. Disable the default "std" feature and enable the "alloc" feature:

[dependencies]
serde_json = { version = "1.0", default-features = false, features = ["alloc"] }

For JSON support in Serde without a memory allocator, please see the serde-json-core crate.

Link: https://crates.io/crates/serde_json

#rust  #rustlang  #encode   #json 

Desmond Ivana

1602569524

The E-Scooters Wave Is Coming: Steer Your Business To Success

E-scooters are becoming more and more familiar. The compactness, coupled with the skill of evading jam-packed traffics, makes the fast-paced world lean towards this micro-mobility innovation. Besides, with COVID-19 propelling the need for safety and privacy, you do not have drivers in an E-scooters ecosystem! With the system being entirely automated, people can smart-lock and unlock E-scooters without any hassle.

Various top manufacturers are spending quality hours exhaustively on their R&D to shift from fuel-led automobiles to electric power-generating vehicles. Although people hesitate to make investments when it comes to buying an e-vehicle, using such vehicles for commuting is no big deal. If you’re an entrepreneur aiming to launch an Uber for E-Scooters app, now is the time to roll up your sleeves as E-scooters are being legalized in numerous countries, including New York.

Now, let’s discuss the remunerative advantages of E-scooters and why entrepreneurs needn’t hesitate to initiate their E-scooter App development.

Lucrative Benefits of E-Scooters

Outplay traffic effortlessly: One of the main concerns of people worldwide is not reaching the destination on time due to prolonged traffic. With four-wheelers becoming more predominant, the situation is steeping towards the worsening phase. With its compact nature, E-scooters can help people sail past traffic without a sweat. This way, people conserve and utilize their time efficiently.

The environmental impact: As simple as it may sound, automobiles pollute the environment on a massive scale. It is high-time people raise their concerns against environmental degradation. E-scooters are the best alternatives from the environmental perspective. These scooters run on a 500W electric motor, eliminating any form of pollution.

Inexpensive in every aspect: The maintenance and fuel costs of automobiles is way too high as vehicles get older. However, with an E-scooter, all it takes is a rechargeable battery with less or no maintenance at all. Moreover, entrepreneurs get to enhance their profits seamlessly, even after providing economical rides to passengers. There’s only an initial investment cost that an entrepreneur needs to take care of.

The 5-Step Workflow of an E-Scooters App

While building a smartphone application, it is essential to focus on the platform’s workflow. An E-scooter app with a user-friendly architecture and immersive workflow can create an instant impact among the audience. Let’s discuss the simple yet intuitive 5-step workflow here,

  • Users register with the platform and locate E-scooters nearby by enabling their location preferences.

  • Users choose their best-suited E-scooters based on numerous metrics like pricing, battery capacity, ratings, etc.

  • Users unlock the vehicle by scanning the QR code. They initiate their trip and drive towards their destination.

  • Upon reaching the destination, users park the E-scooters securely and smart-lock the vehicle.

  • The app displays the total fare with a detailed breakdown. Users pay the amount via a multitude of payment gateways and share their experience in the form of ratings & reviews.

Features that make the E-Scooter app stand apart

Apps like Lime, Bird, etc., have already set a benchmark when it comes to the E-Scooter app market. You need USPs to lure customer attention. Some of the unique elements worth-considering include,

  • QR scanning - To initiate and terminate rides.

  • In-app wallet - To pay for rides effortlessly.

  • Multi-lingual support - To access the app in the customers’ preferred language.

  • Schedule bookings - To book rides well-in-advance.

  • In-app chat/call - To establish a connection between the support team and users.

  • VoIP-based Call masking - To mask users’ contact details.

  • Geofencing - To map virtual boundaries and keep an eye on E-scooters.

Capitalize on the growing market

Establishing your E-Scooters Rental app at the spur of the moment is highly essential if you wish to scale your business in the shortest possible time. Some of the reasons to initiate your app development right away include,

The unexplored market: The E-Scooter market is still in its nascent stages. Rolling out an app with the right feature-set and approach can help you yield unrestricted revenue.

Competitors are experiencing massive growth: Apps like Lime, Bird, etc., witness unprecedented growth in the past few years. Lime was valued at $2.4 billion in 2019. On the other hand, Bird has spread across 100 cities in Europe. With competitors reaping profits, it is high-time entrepreneurs needn’t hesitate to invest in this business opportunity.

The ‘E’ shift among customers: People are gradually moving towards e-vehicles as a measure to conserve time and environment. By rolling out an on-demand app for E-scooters that is economical, people will inevitably turn towards your platform for the daily commute.

Conclusion

In this modern world, saving time and energy is the need of the hour. Add to that the indispensable role of conserving the environment. E-scooters cater to all these aspects comprehensively. Make the most out of the situation and have no second thoughts about initiating your E-Scooter app development.

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E-Learning App Development: Types, Cost & Features

The growth of the online modes for students has increased since the pandemic. This growth has been possible with the help of E-learning software systems. This software has shown a future with more opportunities, even in this pandemic. This market will grow to a high of 350 billion dollars by 2025. Due to this pandemic, most education organizations have shifted to online modes. So, naturally, this means the need for E-learning software systems will grow. So, do you have a complete idea for your E-learning applications and are planning to develop one for your organization? E-learning product development is not a very difficult process to handle. To make the process easier for you, we have added the types of e-learning apps, its features, benefits, development cost and much more in this blog. To read more click on the link.

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