Justice  Reilly

Justice Reilly

1593402240

Binary and Multiclass Text Classification (auto detection in a model test pipeline)

In my previous article (Model Selection in Text Classification), I presented a way to select a model by making a comparison between classical machine learning and deep learning for the binary text classification problem.
The notebook is structured to run automatically with cross-validation all the algorithms and shows the results for the different metrics leaving the user free to select the algorithm according to his needs.

#tutorial #metrics #binary #multiclass #classification #testing

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Binary and Multiclass Text Classification (auto detection in a model test pipeline)
Justice  Reilly

Justice Reilly

1593402240

Binary and Multiclass Text Classification (auto detection in a model test pipeline)

In my previous article (Model Selection in Text Classification), I presented a way to select a model by making a comparison between classical machine learning and deep learning for the binary text classification problem.
The notebook is structured to run automatically with cross-validation all the algorithms and shows the results for the different metrics leaving the user free to select the algorithm according to his needs.

#tutorial #metrics #binary #multiclass #classification #testing

Lets Cms

Lets Cms

1652250166

Binary MLM Software Demo | Binary Compensation Plan, MLM Woocommerce

Binary MLM Software Demo | Binary MLM Compensation Plan, MLM Woocommerce Price USA, Philippines : Binary MLM Woocommerce Software is a web application that integrate with the Woo-commerce plugin and helps to manage binary MLM networks. LETSCMS provide worldwide service, such as USA, Hong Kong, China, UK, UAE, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, Philippines, Japan, Singapore, Romania, Vietnam, Canada, Hong Kong, Russia, Hungary, Romania, Poland, Thailand, Laos and many others.

Binary MLM Woo-commerce includes a two legged structure where in a parent Node has two sub nodes where each new distributor or members is placed in either left or right sub-tree. One sub-tree is known as a Power Leg or Profit Leg while the second sub-tree is a Profit Leg or a weak leg.. It  is one of the basic Binary MLM plan which is required by all the MLM organizations be it small or large. The binary MLM plan helps admin managing users or sub nodes in a binary network to keep record of their income, expenses etc.

Admin Demo : https://wpbmw.mlmforest.com/wp-admin/admin.php?page=bmw-settings

Front Demo : https://wpbmw.mlmforest.com/?page_id=56

Features
Admin Features
Payout Reports.
Report to show complete details of an individual payouts.
Affiliate Commission.
Pair Commission .
Bonus Commission.
Specify eligibility criteria in the admin.
Configuration of commission and bonus details in the admin.
Service Charges for payout.
Run payouts manually.
Payout Detail based on user in admin .

Frontend Features
Register a Binary MLM User from provided registration page.
Register new Members using Genealogy.
New Join Network Page for non-Network Members .
MLM registration can happen by the Checkout page also.
Members can view full payout details in their account.

If you want to know more information and any queries regarding Binary MLM Woo-commerce, you can contact our experts through 
Skype: jks0586, 
Mail: letscmsdev@gmail.com, 
Website: www.letscms.com, www.mlmtrees.com,
Call/WhatsApp/WeChat: +91-9717478599.

more information : https://www.mlmtrees.com/product/binary-mlm-ecommerce

Vedio : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gji5XnnTJNc&list=PLn9cGkS1zw3QMCC-89p5zK39mPtfltkwq&index=5

 

#mlm_plan #Binary_mlm #binary_mlm_plan #Binary_mlm_wordpress_plugin #Binary_mlm_woo-commerce #binary_mlm_ecommerce #binary_mlm_software #binary_mlm_wp_plugin #biary_mlm_ecommerce #mlm_plan
 

Navigating Between DOM Nodes in JavaScript

In the previous chapters you've learnt how to select individual elements on a web page. But there are many occasions where you need to access a child, parent or ancestor element. See the JavaScript DOM nodes chapter to understand the logical relationships between the nodes in a DOM tree.

DOM node provides several properties and methods that allow you to navigate or traverse through the tree structure of the DOM and make changes very easily. In the following section we will learn how to navigate up, down, and sideways in the DOM tree using JavaScript.

Accessing the Child Nodes

You can use the firstChild and lastChild properties of the DOM node to access the first and last direct child node of a node, respectively. If the node doesn't have any child element, it returns null.

Example

<div id="main">
    <h1 id="title">My Heading</h1>
    <p id="hint"><span>This is some text.</span></p>
</div>

<script>
var main = document.getElementById("main");
console.log(main.firstChild.nodeName); // Prints: #text

var hint = document.getElementById("hint");
console.log(hint.firstChild.nodeName); // Prints: SPAN
</script>

Note: The nodeName is a read-only property that returns the name of the current node as a string. For example, it returns the tag name for element node, #text for text node, #comment for comment node, #document for document node, and so on.

If you notice the above example, the nodeName of the first-child node of the main DIV element returns #text instead of H1. Because, whitespace such as spaces, tabs, newlines, etc. are valid characters and they form #text nodes and become a part of the DOM tree. Therefore, since the <div> tag contains a newline before the <h1> tag, so it will create a #text node.

To avoid the issue with firstChild and lastChild returning #text or #comment nodes, you could alternatively use the firstElementChild and lastElementChild properties to return only the first and last element node, respectively. But, it will not work in IE 9 and earlier.

Example

<div id="main">
    <h1 id="title">My Heading</h1>
    <p id="hint"><span>This is some text.</span></p>
</div>

<script>
var main = document.getElementById("main");
alert(main.firstElementChild.nodeName); // Outputs: H1
main.firstElementChild.style.color = "red";

var hint = document.getElementById("hint");
alert(hint.firstElementChild.nodeName); // Outputs: SPAN
hint.firstElementChild.style.color = "blue";
</script>

Similarly, you can use the childNodes property to access all child nodes of a given element, where the first child node is assigned index 0. Here's an example:

Example

<div id="main">
    <h1 id="title">My Heading</h1>
    <p id="hint"><span>This is some text.</span></p>
</div>

<script>
var main = document.getElementById("main");

// First check that the element has child nodes 
if(main.hasChildNodes()) {
    var nodes = main.childNodes;
    
    // Loop through node list and display node name
    for(var i = 0; i < nodes.length; i++) {
        alert(nodes[i].nodeName);
    }
}
</script>

The childNodes returns all child nodes, including non-element nodes like text and comment nodes. To get a collection of only elements, use children property instead.

Example

<div id="main">
    <h1 id="title">My Heading</h1>
    <p id="hint"><span>This is some text.</span></p>
</div>

<script>
var main = document.getElementById("main");

// First check that the element has child nodes 
if(main.hasChildNodes()) {
    var nodes = main.children;
    
    // Loop through node list and display node name
    for(var i = 0; i < nodes.length; i++) {
        alert(nodes[i].nodeName);
    }
}
</script>

#javascript 

Tamia  Walter

Tamia Walter

1596754901

Testing Microservices Applications

The shift towards microservices and modular applications makes testing more important and more challenging at the same time. You have to make sure that the microservices running in containers perform well and as intended, but you can no longer rely on conventional testing strategies to get the job done.

This is where new testing approaches are needed. Testing your microservices applications require the right approach, a suitable set of tools, and immense attention to details. This article will guide you through the process of testing your microservices and talk about the challenges you will have to overcome along the way. Let’s get started, shall we?

A Brave New World

Traditionally, testing a monolith application meant configuring a test environment and setting up all of the application components in a way that matched the production environment. It took time to set up the testing environment, and there were a lot of complexities around the process.

Testing also requires the application to run in full. It is not possible to test monolith apps on a per-component basis, mainly because there is usually a base code that ties everything together, and the app is designed to run as a complete app to work properly.

Microservices running in containers offer one particular advantage: universal compatibility. You don’t have to match the testing environment with the deployment architecture exactly, and you can get away with testing individual components rather than the full app in some situations.

Of course, you will have to embrace the new cloud-native approach across the pipeline. Rather than creating critical dependencies between microservices, you need to treat each one as a semi-independent module.

The only monolith or centralized portion of the application is the database, but this too is an easy challenge to overcome. As long as you have a persistent database running on your test environment, you can perform tests at any time.

Keep in mind that there are additional things to focus on when testing microservices.

  • Microservices rely on network communications to talk to each other, so network reliability and requirements must be part of the testing.
  • Automation and infrastructure elements are now added as codes, and you have to make sure that they also run properly when microservices are pushed through the pipeline
  • While containerization is universal, you still have to pay attention to specific dependencies and create a testing strategy that allows for those dependencies to be included

Test containers are the method of choice for many developers. Unlike monolith apps, which lets you use stubs and mocks for testing, microservices need to be tested in test containers. Many CI/CD pipelines actually integrate production microservices as part of the testing process.

Contract Testing as an Approach

As mentioned before, there are many ways to test microservices effectively, but the one approach that developers now use reliably is contract testing. Loosely coupled microservices can be tested in an effective and efficient way using contract testing, mainly because this testing approach focuses on contracts; in other words, it focuses on how components or microservices communicate with each other.

Syntax and semantics construct how components communicate with each other. By defining syntax and semantics in a standardized way and testing microservices based on their ability to generate the right message formats and meet behavioral expectations, you can rest assured knowing that the microservices will behave as intended when deployed.

Ways to Test Microservices

It is easy to fall into the trap of making testing microservices complicated, but there are ways to avoid this problem. Testing microservices doesn’t have to be complicated at all when you have the right strategy in place.

There are several ways to test microservices too, including:

  • Unit testing: Which allows developers to test microservices in a granular way. It doesn’t limit testing to individual microservices, but rather allows developers to take a more granular approach such as testing individual features or runtimes.
  • Integration testing: Which handles the testing of microservices in an interactive way. Microservices still need to work with each other when they are deployed, and integration testing is a key process in making sure that they do.
  • End-to-end testing: Which⁠—as the name suggests⁠—tests microservices as a complete app. This type of testing enables the testing of features, UI, communications, and other components that construct the app.

What’s important to note is the fact that these testing approaches allow for asynchronous testing. After all, asynchronous development is what makes developing microservices very appealing in the first place. By allowing for asynchronous testing, you can also make sure that components or microservices can be updated independently to one another.

#blog #microservices #testing #caylent #contract testing #end-to-end testing #hoverfly #integration testing #microservices #microservices architecture #pact #testing #unit testing #vagrant #vcr

Software Testing 101: Regression Tests, Unit Tests, Integration Tests

Automation and segregation can help you build better software
If you write automated tests and deliver them to the customer, he can make sure the software is working properly. And, at the end of the day, he paid for it.

Ok. We can segregate or separate the tests according to some criteria. For example, “white box” tests are used to measure the internal quality of the software, in addition to the expected results. They are very useful to know the percentage of lines of code executed, the cyclomatic complexity and several other software metrics. Unit tests are white box tests.

#testing #software testing #regression tests #unit tests #integration tests