Libraries for Debugging Code in Popular Python

In this Python article, let's learn about Debugging Tools: Libraries for Debugging Code in Popular Python

Table of contents:

  • pdb-like Debugger
    • ipdb - IPython-enabled pdb.
    • pdb++ - Another drop-in replacement for pdb.
    • pudb - A full-screen, console-based Python debugger.
    • wdb - An improbable web debugger through WebSockets.
  • Tracing
    • lptrace - strace for Python programs.
    • manhole - Debugging UNIX socket connections and present the stacktraces for all threads and an interactive prompt.
    • pyringe - Debugger capable of attaching to and injecting code into Python processes.
    • python-hunter - A flexible code tracing toolkit.
  • Profiler
    • line_profiler - Line-by-line profiling.
    • memory_profiler - Monitor Memory usage of Python code.
    • py-spy - A sampling profiler for Python programs. Written in Rust.
    • pyflame - A ptracing profiler For Python.
    • vprof - Visual Python profiler.
  • Others
    • django-debug-toolbar - Display various debug information for Django.
    • django-devserver - A drop-in replacement for Django's runserver.
    • flask-debugtoolbar - A port of the django-debug-toolbar to flask.
    • icecream - Inspect variables, expressions, and program execution with a single, simple function call.
    • pyelftools - Parsing and analyzing ELF files and DWARF debugging information.

 

What is a debugging tool?

A debugger is a software tool that can help the software development process by identifying coding errors at various stages of the operating system or application development. Some debuggers will analyze a test run to see what lines of code were not executed.

Debugger for Python programs with a graphical user interface. It uses bdb (part of stdlib) but adds a GUI and has some powerful features like object browser, windows for variables, classes, functions, exceptions, stack, conditional breakpoints, etc.


Libraries for Debugging Code in Popular Python

  1. IPython pdb

ipdb exports functions to access the IPython debugger, which features tab completion, syntax highlighting, better tracebacks, better introspection with the same interface as the pdb module.

Example usage:

import ipdb
ipdb.set_trace()
ipdb.set_trace(context=5)  # will show five lines of code
                           # instead of the default three lines
                           # or you can set it via IPDB_CONTEXT_SIZE env variable
                           # or setup.cfg file
ipdb.pm()
ipdb.run('x[0] = 3')
result = ipdb.runcall(function, arg0, arg1, kwarg='foo')
result = ipdb.runeval('f(1,2) - 3')

Arguments for set_trace

The set_trace function accepts context which will show as many lines of code as defined, and cond, which accepts boolean values (such as abc == 17) and will start ipdb's interface whenever cond equals to True.

Using configuration file

It's possible to set up context using a .ipdb file on your home folder, setup.cfg or pyproject.toml on your project folder. You can also set your file location via env var $IPDB_CONFIG. Your environment variable has priority over the home configuration file, which in turn has priority over the setup config file. Currently, only context setting is available.

A valid setup.cfg is as follows

[ipdb]
context=5

A valid .ipdb is as follows

context=5

A valid pyproject.toml is as follows

[tool.ipdb]
context=5

The post-mortem function, ipdb.pm(), is equivalent to the magic function %debug.

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2.  pdb++

pdb++, a drop-in replacement for pdb (the Python debugger)

What is it?

This module is an extension of the pdb module of the standard library. It is meant to be fully compatible with its predecessor, yet it introduces a number of new features to make your debugging experience as nice as possible.

https://user-images.githubusercontent.com/412005/64484794-2f373380-d20f-11e9-9f04-e1dabf113c6f.png

pdb++ features include:

  • colorful TAB completion of Python expressions (through fancycompleter)
  • optional syntax highlighting of code listings (through Pygments)
  • sticky mode
  • several new commands to be used from the interactive (Pdb++) prompt
  • smart command parsing (hint: have you ever typed r or c at the prompt to print the value of some variable?)
  • additional convenience functions in the pdb module, to be used from your program

pdb++ is meant to be a drop-in replacement for pdb. If you find some unexpected behavior, please report it as a bug.

Installation

Since pdb++ is not a valid package name the package is named pdbpp:

$ pip install pdbpp

pdb++ is also available via conda:

$ conda install -c conda-forge pdbpp

Alternatively, you can just put pdb.py somewhere inside your PYTHONPATH.

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3.  PuDB

Its goal is to provide all the niceties of modern GUI-based debuggers in a more lightweight and keyboard-friendly package. PuDB allows you to debug code right where you write and test it--in a terminal.

Here are some screenshots:

Light theme

  • doc/images/pudb-screenshot-light.png

Dark theme

  • doc/images/pudb-screenshot-dark.png

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4.  wdb

An improbable web debugger through WebSockets

wdb is a full featured web debugger based on a client-server architecture.

The wdb server which is responsible of managing debugging instances along with browser connections (through websockets) is based on Tornado. The wdb clients allow step by step debugging, in-program python code execution, code edition (based on CodeMirror) setting breakpoints...

Due to this architecture, all of this is fully compatible with multithread and multiprocess programs.

wdb works with python 2 (2.6, 2.7), python 3 (3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.5) and pypy. Even better, it is possible to debug a python 2 program with a wdb server running on python 3 and vice-versa or debug a program running on a computer with a debugging server running on another computer inside a web page on a third computer!

Even betterer, it is now possible to pause a currently running python process/thread using code injection from the web interface. (This requires gdb and ptrace enabled)

In other words it's a very enhanced version of pdb directly in your browser with nice features.

Installation:

Global installation:

    $ pip install wdb.server

In virtualenv or with a different python installation:

    $ pip install wdb

(You must have the server installed and running)

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5.  lptrace

lptrace is strace for Python programs. It lets you see in real-time what functions a Python program is running. It's particularly useful to debug weird issues on production.

For example, let's debug a non-trivial program, the Python SimpleHTTPServer. First, let's run the server:

vagrant@precise32:/vagrant$ python -m SimpleHTTPServer 8080 &
[1] 1818
vagrant@precise32:/vagrant$ Serving HTTP on 0.0.0.0 port 8080 ...

Now let's connect lptrace to it:

vagrant@precise32:/vagrant$ sudo python lptrace -p 1818
...
fileno (/usr/lib/python2.7/SocketServer.py:438)
meth (/usr/lib/python2.7/socket.py:223)

fileno (/usr/lib/python2.7/SocketServer.py:438)
meth (/usr/lib/python2.7/socket.py:223)

_handle_request_noblock (/usr/lib/python2.7/SocketServer.py:271)
get_request (/usr/lib/python2.7/SocketServer.py:446)
accept (/usr/lib/python2.7/socket.py:201)
__init__ (/usr/lib/python2.7/socket.py:185)
verify_request (/usr/lib/python2.7/SocketServer.py:296)
process_request (/usr/lib/python2.7/SocketServer.py:304)
finish_request (/usr/lib/python2.7/SocketServer.py:321)
__init__ (/usr/lib/python2.7/SocketServer.py:632)
setup (/usr/lib/python2.7/SocketServer.py:681)
makefile (/usr/lib/python2.7/socket.py:212)
__init__ (/usr/lib/python2.7/socket.py:246)
makefile (/usr/lib/python2.7/socket.py:212)
__init__ (/usr/lib/python2.7/socket.py:246)
handle (/usr/lib/python2.7/BaseHTTPServer.py:336)
handle_one_request (/usr/lib/python2.7/BaseHTTPServer.py:301)
^CReceived Ctrl-C, quitting
vagrant@precise32:/vagrant$

You can see that the server is handling the request in real time! After pressing Ctrl-C, the trace is removed and the program execution resumes normally.

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6.  python-manhole

Debugging manhole for python applications.

Manhole is in-process service that will accept unix domain socket connections and present the stacktraces for all threads and an interactive prompt. It can either work as a python daemon thread waiting for connections at all times or a signal handler (stopping your application and waiting for a connection).

Access to the socket is restricted to the application's effective user id or root.

This is just like Twisted's manhole. It's simpler (no dependencies), it only runs on Unix domain sockets (in contrast to Twisted's manhole which can run on telnet or ssh) and it integrates well with various types of applications.

Usage

Install it:

pip install manhole

You can put this in your django settings, wsgi app file, some module that's always imported early etc:

import manhole
manhole.install() # this will start the daemon thread

# and now you start your app, eg: server.serve_forever()

Now in a shell you can do either of these:

netcat -U /tmp/manhole-1234
socat - unix-connect:/tmp/manhole-1234
socat readline unix-connect:/tmp/manhole-1234

Socat with readline is best (history, editing etc). If your socat doesn't have readline try this.

Sample output:

$ nc -U /tmp/manhole-1234

Python 2.7.3 (default, Apr 10 2013, 06:20:15)
[GCC 4.6.3] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
(InteractiveConsole)
>>> dir()
['__builtins__', 'dump_stacktraces', 'os', 'socket', 'sys', 'traceback']
>>> print 'foobar'
foobar

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7.  Pyringe

Pyringe is a python debugger capable of attaching to running processes, inspecting their state and even of injecting python code into them while they're running. With pyringe, you can list threads, get tracebacks, inspect locals/globals/builtins of running functions, all without having to prepare your program for it.

How do I use it?

You can start the debugger by executing python -m pyringe. Alternatively:

import pyringe
pyringe.interact()

If that reminds you of the code module, good; this is intentional.
After starting the debugger, you'll be greeted by what behaves almost like a regular python REPL.
Try the following:

==> pid:[None] #threads:[0] current thread:[None]
>>> help()
Available commands:
 attach: Attach to the process with the given pid.
 bt: Get a backtrace of the current position.
 [...]
==> pid:[None] #threads:[0] current thread:[None]
>>> attach(12679)
==> pid:[12679] #threads:[11] current thread:[140108099462912]
>>> threads()
[140108099462912, 140108107855616, 140108116248323, 140108124641024, 140108133033728, 140108224739072, 140108233131776, 140108141426432, 140108241524480, 140108249917184, 140108269324032]

The IDs you see here correspond to what threading.current_thread().ident would tell you.
All debugger functions are just regular python functions that have been exposed to the REPL, so you can do things like the following.

==> pid:[12679] #threads:[11] current thread:[140108099462912]
>>> for tid in threads():
...   if not tid % 10:
...     thread(tid)
...     bt()
... 
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/threading.py", line 524, in __bootstrap
    self.__bootstrap_inner()
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/threading.py", line 551, in __bootstrap_inner
    self.run()
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/threading.py", line 504, in run
    self.__target(*self.__args, **self.__kwargs)
  File "./test.py", line 46, in Idle
    Thread_2_Func(1)
  File "./test.py", line 40, in Wait
    time.sleep(n)
==> pid:[12679] #threads:[11] current thread:[140108241524480]
>>> 

You can access the inferior's locals and inspect them like so:

==> pid:[12679] #threads:[11] current thread:[140108241524480]
>>> inflocals()
{'a': <proxy of A object at remote 0x1d9b290>, 'LOL': 'success!', 'b': <proxy of B object at remote 0x1d988c0>, 'n': 1}
==> pid:[12679] #threads:[11] current thread:[140108241524480]
>>> p('a')
<proxy of A object at remote 0x1d9b290>
==> pid:[12679] #threads:[11] current thread:[140108241524480]
>>> p('a').attr
'Some_magic_string'
==> pid:[12679] #threads:[11] current thread:[140108241524480]
>>> 

And sure enough, the definition of a's class reads:

class Example(object):
  cl_attr = False
  def __init__(self):
    self.attr = 'Some_magic_string'

There's limits to how far this proxying of objects goes, and everything that isn't trivial data will show up as strings (like '<function at remote 0x1d957d0>').

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8.  python-hunter

Hunter is a flexible code tracing toolkit, not for measuring coverage, but for debugging, logging, inspection and other nefarious purposes. It has a simple Python API, a convenient terminal API and a CLI tool to attach to processes.

Installation

pip install hunter

Documentation

https://python-hunter.readthedocs.io/

Getting started

Basic use involves passing various filters to the trace option. An example:

import hunter
hunter.trace(module='posixpath', action=hunter.CallPrinter)

import os
os.path.join('a', 'b')

That would result in:

>>> os.path.join('a', 'b')
         /usr/lib/python3.6/posixpath.py:75    call      => join(a='a')
         /usr/lib/python3.6/posixpath.py:80    line         a = os.fspath(a)
         /usr/lib/python3.6/posixpath.py:81    line         sep = _get_sep(a)
         /usr/lib/python3.6/posixpath.py:41    call         => _get_sep(path='a')
         /usr/lib/python3.6/posixpath.py:42    line            if isinstance(path, bytes):
         /usr/lib/python3.6/posixpath.py:45    line            return '/'
         /usr/lib/python3.6/posixpath.py:45    return       <= _get_sep: '/'
         /usr/lib/python3.6/posixpath.py:82    line         path = a
         /usr/lib/python3.6/posixpath.py:83    line         try:
         /usr/lib/python3.6/posixpath.py:84    line         if not p:
         /usr/lib/python3.6/posixpath.py:86    line         for b in map(os.fspath, p):
         /usr/lib/python3.6/posixpath.py:87    line         if b.startswith(sep):
         /usr/lib/python3.6/posixpath.py:89    line         elif not path or path.endswith(sep):
         /usr/lib/python3.6/posixpath.py:92    line         path += sep + b
         /usr/lib/python3.6/posixpath.py:86    line         for b in map(os.fspath, p):
         /usr/lib/python3.6/posixpath.py:96    line         return path
         /usr/lib/python3.6/posixpath.py:96    return    <= join: 'a/b'
'a/b'

In a terminal it would look like:

https://raw.githubusercontent.com/ionelmc/python-hunter/master/docs/code-trace.png

Another useful scenario is to ignore all standard modules and force colors to make them stay even if the output is redirected to a file.

import hunter
hunter.trace(stdlib=False, action=hunter.CallPrinter(force_colors=True))

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9.  line_profiler

line_profiler is a module for doing line-by-line profiling of functions. kernprof is a convenient script for running either line_profiler or the Python standard library's cProfile or profile modules, depending on what is available.

Installation

Note: As of version 2.1.2, pip install line_profiler does not work. Please install as follows until it is fixed in the next release:

git clone https://github.com/rkern/line_profiler.git
find line_profiler -name '*.pyx' -exec cython {} \;
cd line_profiler
pip install . --user

Releases of line_profiler can be installed using pip:

$ pip install line_profiler

Source releases and any binaries can be downloaded from the PyPI link.

http://pypi.python.org/pypi/line_profiler

To check out the development sources, you can use Git:

$ git clone https://github.com/rkern/line_profiler.git

You may also download source tarballs of any snapshot from that URL.

Source releases will require a C compiler in order to build line_profiler. In addition, git checkouts will also require Cython >= 0.10. Source releases on PyPI should contain the pregenerated C sources, so Cython should not be required in that case.

kernprof is a single-file pure Python script and does not require a compiler. If you wish to use it to run cProfile and not line-by-line profiling, you may copy it to a directory on your PATH manually and avoid trying to build any C extensions.

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10.  Memory Profiler

This is a python module for monitoring memory consumption of a process as well as line-by-line analysis of memory consumption for python programs. It is a pure python module which depends on the psutil module.

Installation

To install through easy_install or pip:

$ easy_install -U memory_profiler # pip install -U memory_profiler

To install from source, download the package, extract and type:

$ python setup.py install

Usage

line-by-line memory usage

The line-by-line memory usage mode is used much in the same way of the line_profiler: first decorate the function you would like to profile with @profile and then run the script with a special script (in this case with specific arguments to the Python interpreter).

In the following example, we create a simple function my_func that allocates lists a, b and then deletes b:

@profile
def my_func():
    a = [1] * (10 ** 6)
    b = [2] * (2 * 10 ** 7)
    del b
    return a

if __name__ == '__main__':
    my_func()

Execute the code passing the option -m memory_profiler to the python interpreter to load the memory_profiler module and print to stdout the line-by-line analysis. If the file name was example.py, this would result in:

$ python -m memory_profiler example.py

Output will follow:

Line #    Mem usage  Increment   Line Contents
==============================================
     3                           @profile
     4      5.97 MB    0.00 MB   def my_func():
     5     13.61 MB    7.64 MB       a = [1] * (10 ** 6)
     6    166.20 MB  152.59 MB       b = [2] * (2 * 10 ** 7)
     7     13.61 MB -152.59 MB       del b
     8     13.61 MB    0.00 MB       return a

The first column represents the line number of the code that has been profiled, the second column (Mem usage) the memory usage of the Python interpreter after that line has been executed. The third column (Increment) represents the difference in memory of the current line with respect to the last one. The last column (Line Contents) prints the code that has been profiled.

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11.  py-spy

py-spy is a sampling profiler for Python programs. It lets you visualize what your Python program is spending time on without restarting the program or modifying the code in any way. py-spy is extremely low overhead: it is written in Rust for speed and doesn't run in the same process as the profiled Python program. This means py-spy is safe to use against production Python code.

py-spy works on Linux, OSX, Windows and FreeBSD, and supports profiling all recent versions of the CPython interpreter (versions 2.3-2.7 and 3.3-3.10).

Installation

Prebuilt binary wheels can be installed from PyPI with:

pip install py-spy

You can also download prebuilt binaries from the GitHub Releases Page.

If you're a Rust user, py-spy can also be installed with: cargo install py-spy.

On macOS, py-spy is in Homebrew and can be installed with brew install py-spy.

On Arch Linux, py-spy is in AUR and can be installed with yay -S py-spy.

On Alpine Linux, py-spy is in testing repository and can be installed with apk add py-spy --update-cache --repository http://dl-3.alpinelinux.org/alpine/edge/testing/ --allow-untrusted.

Usage

py-spy works from the command line and takes either the PID of the program you want to sample from or the command line of the python program you want to run. py-spy has three subcommands record, top and dump:

record

py-spy supports recording profiles to a file using the record command. For example, you can generate a flame graph of your python process by going:

py-spy record -o profile.svg --pid 12345
# OR
py-spy record -o profile.svg -- python myprogram.py

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12.  Pyflame

Pyflame is a high performance profiling tool that generates flame graphs for Python. Pyflame is implemented in C++, and uses the Linux ptrace(2) system call to collect profiling information. It can take snapshots of the Python call stack without explicit instrumentation, meaning you can profile a program without modifying its source code. Pyflame is capable of profiling embedded Python interpreters like uWSGI. It fully supports profiling multi-threaded Python programs.

Pyflame usually introduces significantly less overhead than the builtin profile (or cProfile) modules, and emits richer profiling data. The profiling overhead is low enough that you can use it to profile live processes in production.

Quickstart

Building And Installing

For Debian/Ubuntu, install the following:

# Install build dependencies on Debian or Ubuntu.
sudo apt-get install autoconf automake autotools-dev g++ pkg-config python-dev python3-dev libtool make

Once you have the build dependencies installed:

./autogen.sh
./configure
make

The make command will produce an executable at src/pyflame that you can run and use.

Optionally, if you have virtualenv installed, you can test the executable you produced using make check.

Using Pyflame

The full documentation for using Pyflame is here. But here's a quick guide:

# Attach to PID 12345 and profile it for 1 second
pyflame -p 12345

# Attach to PID 768 and profile it for 5 seconds, sampling every 0.01 seconds
pyflame -s 5 -r 0.01 -p 768

# Run py.test against tests/, emitting sample data to prof.txt
pyflame -o prof.txt -t py.test tests/

In all of these cases you will get flame graph data on stdout (or to a file if you used -o). This data is in the format expected by flamegraph.pl, which you can find here.

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13.  vprof

vprof is a Python package providing rich and interactive visualizations for various Python program characteristics such as running time and memory usage. It supports Python 3.4+ and distributed under BSD license.

The project is in active development and some of its features might not work as expected.

Installation

vprof can be installed from PyPI

pip install vprof

To build vprof from sources, clone this repository and execute

python3 setup.py deps_install && python3 setup.py build_ui && python3 setup.py install

To install just vprof dependencies, run

python3 setup.py deps_install

Usage

vprof -c <config> <src>

<config> is a combination of supported modes:

  • c - CPU flame graph ⚠️ Not available for windows #62

Shows CPU flame graph for <src>.

  • p - profiler

Runs built-in Python profiler on <src> and displays results.

  • m - memory graph

Shows objects that are tracked by CPython GC and left in memory after code execution. Also shows process memory usage after execution of each line of <src>.

  • h - code heatmap

Displays all executed code of <src> with line run times and execution counts.

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14.  Django Debug Toolbar

The Django Debug Toolbar is a configurable set of panels that display various debug information about the current request/response and when clicked, display more details about the panel's content.


Here's a screenshot of the toolbar in action:

Django Debug Toolbar screenshot

In addition to the built-in panels, a number of third-party panels are contributed by the community.

The current stable version of the Debug Toolbar is 3.6.0. It works on Django ≥ 3.2.4.

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15.  django-devserver

A drop in replacement for Django's built-in runserver command. Features include:

  • An extendable interface for handling things such as real-time logging.
  • Integration with the werkzeug interactive debugger.
  • Threaded (default) and multi-process development servers.
  • Ability to specify a WSGI application as your target environment.

Note

django-devserver works on Django 1.3 and newer

Installation

To install the latest stable version:

pip install git+git://github.com/dcramer/django-devserver#egg=django-devserver

django-devserver has some optional dependancies, which we highly recommend installing.

  • pip install sqlparse -- pretty SQL formatting
  • pip install werkzeug -- interactive debugger
  • pip install guppy -- tracks memory usage (required for MemoryUseModule)
  • pip install line_profiler -- does line-by-line profiling (required for LineProfilerModule)

You will need to include devserver in your INSTALLED_APPS:

INSTALLED_APPS = (
    ...
    'devserver',
)

If you're using django.contrib.staticfiles or any other apps with management command runserver, make sure to put devserver above any of them (or below, for Django<1.7). Otherwise devserver will log an error, but it will fail to work properly.

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16.  Flask Debug-toolbar

This is a port of the excellent django-debug-toolbar for Flask applications.

Installation

Installing is simple with pip:

$ pip install flask-debugtoolbar

Usage

Setting up the debug toolbar is simple:

from flask import Flask
from flask_debugtoolbar import DebugToolbarExtension

app = Flask(__name__)

# the toolbar is only enabled in debug mode:
app.debug = True

# set a 'SECRET_KEY' to enable the Flask session cookies
app.config['SECRET_KEY'] = '<replace with a secret key>'

toolbar = DebugToolbarExtension(app)

The toolbar will automatically be injected into Jinja templates when debug mode is on. In production, setting app.debug = False will disable the toolbar.

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17.  IceCream

Do you ever use print() or log() to debug your code? Of course you do. IceCream, or ic for short, makes print debugging a little sweeter.

ic() is like print(), but better:

  1. It prints both expressions/variable names and their values.
  2. It's 40% faster to type.
  3. Data structures are pretty printed.
  4. Output is syntax highlighted.
  5. It optionally includes program context: filename, line number, and parent function.

IceCream is well tested, permissively licensed, and supports Python 2, Python 3, PyPy2, and PyPy3. (Python 3.11 support is forthcoming.)

Inspect Variables

Have you ever printed variables or expressions to debug your program? If you've ever typed something like

print(foo('123'))

or the more thorough

print("foo('123')", foo('123'))

then ic() will put a smile on your face. With arguments, ic() inspects itself and prints both its own arguments and the values of those arguments.

from icecream import ic

def foo(i):
    return i + 333

ic(foo(123))

Prints

ic| foo(123): 456

Similarly,

d = {'key': {1: 'one'}}
ic(d['key'][1])

class klass():
    attr = 'yep'
ic(klass.attr)

Prints

ic| d['key'][1]: 'one'
ic| klass.attr: 'yep'

Just give ic() a variable or expression and you're done. Easy.

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18.  pyelftools

pyelftools is a pure-Python library for parsing and analyzing ELF files and DWARF debugging information. See the User's guide for more details.

Pre-requisites

As a user of pyelftools, one only needs Python 3 to run. For hacking on pyelftools the requirements are a bit more strict, please see the hacking guide.

Installing

pyelftools can be installed from PyPI (Python package index):

> pip install pyelftools

Alternatively, you can download the source distribution for the most recent and historic versions from the Downloads tab on the pyelftools project page (by going to Tags). Then, you can install from source, as usual:

> python setup.py install

Since pyelftools is a work in progress, it's recommended to have the most recent version of the code. This can be done by downloading the master zip file or just cloning the Git repository.

Since pyelftools has no external dependencies, it's also easy to use it without installing, by locally adjusting PYTHONPATH.

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FAQ about Debugging Tools python

  • How many types of debugging are in Python?

Debugging in any programming language typically involves two types of errors: syntax or logical. Syntax errors are those where the programming language commands are not interpreted by the compiler or interpreter because of a problem with how the program is written.

  • Best Debugging Tools include:

Chrome DevTools, Progress Telerik Fiddler, GDB (GNU Debugger), Data Display Debugger, SonarLint, Froglogic Squish, and TotalView HPC Debugging Software.

  • Why is it called debugging?

The terms "bug" and "debugging" are popularly attributed to Admiral Grace Hopper in the 1940s. While she was working on a Mark II computer at Harvard University, her associates discovered a moth stuck in a relay and thereby impeding operation, whereupon she remarked that they were "debugging" the system.

  • Why do we need debugging?

Debugging is important because it allows software engineers and developers to fix errors in a program before releasing it to the public. It's a complementary process to testing, which involves learning how an error affects a program overall.


Related videos:

Python Tutorial - Introduction to DEBUGGING


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Ray  Patel

Ray Patel

1619510796

Lambda, Map, Filter functions in python

Welcome to my Blog, In this article, we will learn python lambda function, Map function, and filter function.

Lambda function in python: Lambda is a one line anonymous function and lambda takes any number of arguments but can only have one expression and python lambda syntax is

Syntax: x = lambda arguments : expression

Now i will show you some python lambda function examples:

#python #anonymous function python #filter function in python #lambda #lambda python 3 #map python #python filter #python filter lambda #python lambda #python lambda examples #python map

August  Larson

August Larson

1625100480

4 Cool Python Libraries That You Should Know About

Discover useful Python libraries that you should try out in your next project

Some of my most popular blogs are about Python libraries. I believe that they are so popular because Python libraries have the power to save us a lot of time and headaches. The problem is that most people focus on those most popular libraries but forget that multiple less-known Python libraries are just as good as their most famous cousins.

Finding new Python libraries can also be problematic. Sometimes we read about these great libraries, and when we try them, they don’t work as we expected. If this has ever happened to you, fear no more. I got your back!

In this blog, I will show you four Python libraries and why you should try them. Let’s get started.

#python #coding #programming #cool python libraries #python libraries #4 cool python libraries

Ray  Patel

Ray Patel

1626984360

Common Anti-Patterns in Python

Improve and streamline your code by learning about these common anti-patterns that will save you time and effort. Examples of good and bad practices included.

1. Not Using with to Open Files

When you open a file without the with statement, you need to remember closing the file via calling close() explicitly when finished with processing it. Even while explicitly closing the resource, there are chances of exceptions before the resource is actually released. This can cause inconsistencies, or lead the file to be corrupted. Opening a file via with implements the context manager protocol that releases the resource when execution is outside of the with block.

2. Using list/dict/set Comprehension Unnecessarily

3. Unnecessary Use of Generators

4. Returning More Than One Object Type in a Function Call

5. Not Using get() to Return Default Values From a Dictionary

#code reviews #python programming #debugger #code review tips #python coding #python code #code debugging

Shardul Bhatt

Shardul Bhatt

1626775355

Why use Python for Software Development

No programming language is pretty much as diverse as Python. It enables building cutting edge applications effortlessly. Developers are as yet investigating the full capability of end-to-end Python development services in various areas. 

By areas, we mean FinTech, HealthTech, InsureTech, Cybersecurity, and that's just the beginning. These are New Economy areas, and Python has the ability to serve every one of them. The vast majority of them require massive computational abilities. Python's code is dynamic and powerful - equipped for taking care of the heavy traffic and substantial algorithmic capacities. 

Programming advancement is multidimensional today. Endeavor programming requires an intelligent application with AI and ML capacities. Shopper based applications require information examination to convey a superior client experience. Netflix, Trello, and Amazon are genuine instances of such applications. Python assists with building them effortlessly. 

5 Reasons to Utilize Python for Programming Web Apps 

Python can do such numerous things that developers can't discover enough reasons to admire it. Python application development isn't restricted to web and enterprise applications. It is exceptionally adaptable and superb for a wide range of uses.

Robust frameworks 

Python is known for its tools and frameworks. There's a structure for everything. Django is helpful for building web applications, venture applications, logical applications, and mathematical processing. Flask is another web improvement framework with no conditions. 

Web2Py, CherryPy, and Falcon offer incredible capabilities to customize Python development services. A large portion of them are open-source frameworks that allow quick turn of events. 

Simple to read and compose 

Python has an improved sentence structure - one that is like the English language. New engineers for Python can undoubtedly understand where they stand in the development process. The simplicity of composing allows quick application building. 

The motivation behind building Python, as said by its maker Guido Van Rossum, was to empower even beginner engineers to comprehend the programming language. The simple coding likewise permits developers to roll out speedy improvements without getting confused by pointless subtleties. 

Utilized by the best 

Alright - Python isn't simply one more programming language. It should have something, which is the reason the business giants use it. Furthermore, that too for different purposes. Developers at Google use Python to assemble framework organization systems, parallel information pusher, code audit, testing and QA, and substantially more. Netflix utilizes Python web development services for its recommendation algorithm and media player. 

Massive community support 

Python has a steadily developing community that offers enormous help. From amateurs to specialists, there's everybody. There are a lot of instructional exercises, documentation, and guides accessible for Python web development solutions. 

Today, numerous universities start with Python, adding to the quantity of individuals in the community. Frequently, Python designers team up on various tasks and help each other with algorithmic, utilitarian, and application critical thinking. 

Progressive applications 

Python is the greatest supporter of data science, Machine Learning, and Artificial Intelligence at any enterprise software development company. Its utilization cases in cutting edge applications are the most compelling motivation for its prosperity. Python is the second most well known tool after R for data analytics.

The simplicity of getting sorted out, overseeing, and visualizing information through unique libraries makes it ideal for data based applications. TensorFlow for neural networks and OpenCV for computer vision are two of Python's most well known use cases for Machine learning applications.

Summary

Thinking about the advances in programming and innovation, Python is a YES for an assorted scope of utilizations. Game development, web application development services, GUI advancement, ML and AI improvement, Enterprise and customer applications - every one of them uses Python to its full potential. 

The disadvantages of Python web improvement arrangements are regularly disregarded by developers and organizations because of the advantages it gives. They focus on quality over speed and performance over blunders. That is the reason it's a good idea to utilize Python for building the applications of the future.

#python development services #python development company #python app development #python development #python in web development #python software development

Ray  Patel

Ray Patel

1619571780

Top 20 Most Useful Python Modules or Packages

 March 25, 2021  Deepak@321  0 Comments

Welcome to my blog, In this article, we will learn the top 20 most useful python modules or packages and these modules every Python developer should know.

Hello everybody and welcome back so in this article I’m going to be sharing with you 20 Python modules you need to know. Now I’ve split these python modules into four different categories to make little bit easier for us and the categories are:

  1. Web Development
  2. Data Science
  3. Machine Learning
  4. AI and graphical user interfaces.

Near the end of the article, I also share my personal favorite Python module so make sure you stay tuned to see what that is also make sure to share with me in the comments down below your favorite Python module.

#python #packages or libraries #python 20 modules #python 20 most usefull modules #python intersting modules #top 20 python libraries #top 20 python modules #top 20 python packages