React Query Builder With Cube.js

React Query Builder With Cube.js

In this post, we look at how we can use these two open source libraries to create a query functionality in an application using JavaScript.

In this post, we look at how we can use these two open source libraries to create a query functionality in an application using JavaScript.

Starting from version 0.4, the React Cube.js client comes with the <QueryBuilder /> component. It is designed to help developers build interactive analytics query builders. The <QueryBuilder /> abstracts state management and API calls to the Cube.js backend. It uses the render prop and doesn’t render anything itself, but calls the render function instead. This way it gives maximum flexibility to building a custom-tailored UI with a minimal API.

The example below shows the <QueryBuilder /> component in action with Ant Design UI framework elements.

The above example is from Cube.js Playground. You can check its source code on GitHub.

This tutorial walks through building the much simpler version of the query builder. But it covers all the basics you need to build one of your own.

Setup a Demo Backend

If you already have Cube.js backend up and running you can skip this step.

First, let’s install the Cube.js CLI and create a new application with a Postgres database.

$ npm install -g cubejs-cli
$ cubejs create -d postgres react-query-builder

We host a dump with sample data for tutorials. It is a simple “E-commerce database” with orders, products, product categories, and users tables.

$ curl http://cube.dev/downloads/ecom-dump.sql > ecom-dump.sql
$ createdb ecom
$ psql --dbname ecom -f ecom-dump.sql

Once you have data in your database, change the content of the .envfile inside your Cube.js directory to the following. It sets the credentials to access the database, as well as a secret to generate auth tokens.

CUBEJS_DB_NAME=ecom
CUBEJS_DB_TYPE=postgres
CUBEJS_API_SECRET=SECRET

Now that we have everything configured, the last step is to generate a Cube.js schema based on some of our tables and start the dev server.

$ cubejs generate -t line_items
$ yarn dev

If you open http://localhost:4000 in your browser you will access the Cube.js Playground. It is a development environment which generates the Cube.js schema, creates scaffolding for charts, and more. It has its own query builder which lets you generate charts with different charting libraries.

Now, let’s move on to building our own query builder.

Building a Query Builder

The <QueryBuilder /> component uses the render props technique. It acts as a data provider by managing the state and API layer and calls render props to let developers implement their render logic.

Besides render, the only required prop is cubejsApi. It expects an instance of your cube.js API client returned by the cubejs method.

Here you can find a detailed reference of the [<QueryBuilder />](https://cube.dev/docs/@cubejs-client-react#query-builder "<QueryBuilder />")component.

import cubejs from "@cubejs-client/core";
import { QueryBuilder } from "@cubejs-client/react";
const cubejsApi = cubejs("CUBEJS_TOKEN", { apiurl: "CUBEJS_BACKEND_URL" });

export default () => (
  <QueryBuilder
    cubejsApi={cubejsApi}
    render={queryBuilder => {
      // Render whatever you want based on the state of queryBuilder
    }}
  />
);

The properties of queryBuilder can be split into categories based on what element they are referred to. To render and update measures, you need to use measures, availableMeasures, and updateMeasures.

measures is an array of already selected measures. It is usually empty in the beginning (unless you passed a default query prop). availableMeasures is an array of all measures loaded via API from your Cube.js data schema. Both measures and availableMeasures are arrays of objects with name, title, shortTitle, and type keys. name is used as an ID. title could be used as a human-readable name, and shortTitle is only the measure’s title without the Cube’s title.

// `measures` and `availableMeasures` are arrays with the following structure
[
  { name: "Orders.count", title: "Orders Count", shortTitle: "Count", type: "number" },
  { name: "Orders.number", title: "Orders Number", shortTitle: "Number", type: "number" }
]

updateMeasures is an object with three functions: add, remove, and update. It is used to control the state of the query builder related to measures.

Now, using these properties, we can render a UI to manage measures and render a simple line chart, which will dynamically change the content based on the state of the query builder.

import React from "react";
import ReactDOM from "react-dom";
import { Layout, Divider, Empty, Select } from "antd";
import { QueryBuilder } from "@cubejs-client/react";
import cubejs from "@cubejs-client/core";
import "antd/dist/antd.css";

import ChartRenderer from "./ChartRenderer";

const cubejsApi = cubejs(
"YOUR-CUBEJS-API-TOKEN",
 { apiUrl: "http://localhost:4000/cubejs-api/v1" }
);

const App = () => (
 <QueryBuilder
   query={{
     timeDimensions: [
       {
         dimension: "LineItems.createdAt",
         granularity: "month"
       }
     ]
   }}
   cubejsApi={cubejsApi}
   render={({ resultSet, measures, availableMeasures, updateMeasures }) => (
     <Layout.Content style={{ padding: "20px" }}>
       <Select
         mode="multiple"
         style={{ width: "100%" }}
         placeholder="Please select"
         onSelect={measure => updateMeasures.add(measure)}
         onDeselect={measure => updateMeasures.remove(measure)}
       >
         {availableMeasures.map(measure => (
           <Select.Option key={measure.name} value={measure}>
             {measure.title}
           </Select.Option>
         ))}
       </Select>
       <Divider />
       {measures.length > 0 ? (
         <ChartRenderer resultSet={resultSet} />
       ) : (
         <Empty description="Select measure or dimension to get started" />
       )}
     </Layout.Content>
   )}
 />
);

const rootElement = document.getElementById("root");
ReactDOM.render(<App />, rootElement);

The code above is enough to render a simple query builder with a measure select.

Similar to measures, availableMeasures, and updateMeasures, there are properties to render and manage dimensions, segments, time, filters, and chart types. You can find the full list of properties in the documentation.

Also, it is worth checking the source code of a more complicated query builder from Cube.js Playground. You can find it on GitHub here.

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React Web Development: A Guide to Develop Progressive Web Applications

React Web Development: A Guide to Develop Progressive Web Applications

Outperform your competition with progressive web development and React.

Progressive web applications (PWAs) quickly gained popularity because they are web performance applications based on fast performance, streamlined to provide a mobile app-like experience. PWAs are built using HTML, CSS, and JavaScript to create a level of availability and performance equivalent to that of native mobile applications. They respond quickly, consume less data, store more space, and support push notifications and offline use in the browser.

Building a progressive web application has now become the web development trend that every business wants to follow. Significant players like Twitter and Flipboard have recently rolled out their progressive web apps to provide a mobile experience for users, without requiring them to install the app. In this article, you will learn how to build a progressive web application using React. Let's get started.

Step One — Set up the React Application

First, create a React application with create-react-app. To do so, you need to run the following commands:

  • npm install -g create-react-app
  • create-react-app pwa-app

Now, install React Router:

You need to replace the content of src / App.js using the code below to get a basic template with navigation.

import React, { Component } from 'react';
import { Router, browserHistory, Route, Link } from 'react-router';
import './App.css';

const NavBar = () => (
<div className="navbar">
<Link to="/">Feed</Link>
<Link to="/profile">Profile</Link>
</div>
);

const Template = ({ title }) => (
<div>
<NavBar />
<p className="page-info">
This is the {title} page.
</p>
</div>
);

const Feed = (props) => (
<Template title="Feed"/>
);

const Profile = (props) => (
<Template title="Profile"/>
);

class App extends Component {
render() {
return (
<Router history={browserHistory}>
<Route path="/" component={Feed}/>
<Route path="/profile" component={Profile}/>
</Router>
);
}
}
export default App;

Now, you'll have to update the default styles by replacing your src/App.css with the styles below to make your application look clean.

.navbar {
background-color: #01C8E5;
text-align: center;
}

.navbar a {
display: inline-block;
padding: 10px;
color: #fff;
text-decoration: none;
}

.page-info {
text-align: center;
font-weight: bold;
}

Then, run npm start to test the application in the browser. It is basically an application with two routes. Now, you will convert it to PWA.

Step Two — Lighthouse Setting and Auditing

Lighthouse is an automated open-source tool for testing applications against PWA checklists. It facilitates audits for accessibility, performance, and more.

Check your application with Lighthouse. Click the Lighthouse icon from the top right corner in Chrome and then click the "Create Report" button. The generated report will look like this:

Creating a report to test your PWA with Lighthouse

Fix all failed audits.

Step 3 — Sign Up for a Service Staff

Service employees are proxy servers that connect the application and the network. With Service Worker, you will have to block network requests and save cached files. It allows your application to work even with an unavailable system.

Create an empty worker.js file in your application's general directory and add the following code to that file.

// Flag for enabling cache in production
var doCache = false;

var CACHE_NAME = 'pwa-app-cache';

// Delete old caches
self.addEventListener('activate', event => {
const currentCachelist = [CACHE_NAME];
event.waitUntil(
caches.keys()
.then(keyList =>
Promise.all(keyList.map(key => {
if (!currentCachelist.includes(key)) {
return caches.delete(key);
}
}))
)
);
});

// This triggers when user starts the app
self.addEventListener('install', function(event) {
if (doCache) {
event.waitUntil(
caches.open(CACHE_NAME)
.then(function(cache) {
fetch('asset-manifest.json')
.then(response => {
response.json();
})
.then(assets => {
// We will cache initial page and the main.js
// We could also cache assets like CSS and images
const urlsToCache = [
'/',
assets['main.js']
];
cache.addAll(urlsToCache);
})
})
);
}
});

// Here we intercept request and serve up the matching files
self.addEventListener('fetch', function(event) {
if (doCache) {
event.respondWith(
caches.match(event.request).then(function(response) {
return response || fetch(event.request);
})
);
}
});

Now, check if the browsers support service staff and then register worker.js. To do this, you need to add the following script to the file public/index.html (note that shrink-to-fit=no in the viewport meta tag has been deleted).

<!doctype html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
<meta charset="utf-8">
<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1">
<meta name="theme-color" content="#000000">
<link rel="manifest" href="%PUBLIC_URL%/manifest.json">
<link rel="shortcut icon" href="%PUBLIC_URL%/favicon.ico">
<title>React App</title>
</head>
<body>
<noscript>
You need to enable JavaScript to run this app.
</noscript>
<div id="root"></div>
<script>
if ('serviceWorker' in navigator) {
window.addEventListener('load', function() {
navigator.serviceWorker.register('worker.js').then(function(registration) {
console.log('Worker registration successful', registration.scope);
}, function(err) {
console.log('Worker registration failed', err);
}).catch(function(err) {
console.log(err);
});
});
} else {
console.log('Service Worker is not supported by browser.');
}
</script>
</body>
</html>

You must restart your application and reload the browser after which you will see the Successful registration of member workers on the developer console. Now, recreate the Lighthouse report.

Step 4 - Improve the Progressive Nature of the Application

Your application will display an original blank div until the JavaScript loads and React hooks the original route. You must make sure your application works without downloading JS and displaying a bit of CSS and HTML before React takes effect. Your updated Index.html will look like this:

<!doctype html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
<meta charset="utf-8">
<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1">
<meta name="theme-color" content="#000000">
<link rel="manifest" href="%PUBLIC_URL%/manifest.json">
<link rel="shortcut icon" href="%PUBLIC_URL%/favicon.ico">
<title>React App</title>
<style type="text/css">
body {
margin: 0;
padding: 0;
font-family: sans-serif;
}
.navbar {
background-color: #01C8E5;
text-align: center;
}
.navbar a {
display: inline-block;
padding: 10px;
color: #fff;
text-decoration: none;
}
.page-info {
text-align: center;
font-weight: bold;
}
</style>
</head>
<body>
<noscript>
You need to enable JavaScript to run this app.
</noscript>
<div id="root">
<div class="navbar">
<a href="/">Feed</a>
</div>
<p class="page-info">
Loading an awesome app...
</p>
</div>
<script>
if ('serviceWorker' in navigator) {
window.addEventListener('load', function() {
navigator.serviceWorker.register('worker.js').then(function(registration) {
console.log('Worker registration successful', registration.scope);
}, function(err) {
console.log('Worker registration failed', err);
}).catch(function(err) {
console.log(err);
});
});
} else {
console.log('Service Worker is not supported by browser.');
}
</script>
</body>
</html>

Now, use Lighthouse to retest your application, and you'll see an improvement in the performance of the application.

Step 5 - Add the Splash Icon

You are required to add a 512x512 icon to display on the screen. To do so, you will have to update the manifest.json file and add the t0 icon to the public directory.

{
"short_name": "React App",
"name": "Create React App Sample",
"icons": [
{
"src": "icon-192x192.png",
"sizes": "192x192",
"type": "image/png"
},
{
"src": "icon-512x512.png",
"sizes": "512x512",
"type": "image/png"
}
],
"start_url": "/",
"display": "standalone",
"theme_color": "#000000",
"background_color": "#ffffff"
}

Also, use the following meta tags to allow the browser to determine that your application is a PWA.

<!-- Tell the browser it's a PWA -->
<meta name="mobile-web-app-capable" content="yes">
<!-- Tell iOS it's a PWA -->
<meta name="apple-mobile-web-app-capable" content="yes">
Step 6 — Implement PWA

Now, only HTTPS is missing, and the cache can be fixed after you deploy the application. Update the doCache flag with true in the worker.js file. Create a new project in the firebase dashboard and name it "Pwa Application." Then, run the following command in the project directory:

npm install -g firebase-tools
firebase login
firebase init

Your Firebase.json will look like this:

{
"hosting": {
"public": "build",
"rewrites": [
{
"source": "**",
"destination": "/index.html"
}
]
}
}

After initializing, building and deploying your application.

  • npm run build
  • firebase deploy

You will see results after you test the application using Lighthouse on the deployed URL.

Final product with Lighthouse

Finally, you have created your first progressive web application with React.js!

Originally published by Manoj Kumar Bardhan at  dzone.com

=======================================================

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