Toby Rogers

Toby Rogers

1576784052

Learning Functional Programming with JavaScript

Want to write more robust, maintainable code? In this course, discover how this can be accomplished with functional programming, and learn about the functional concepts at the heart of many JavaScript frameworks and programs. In this JavaScript tutorial explains what functional programming is and how it compares to object-oriented programming. Then covers the basics of working with first-class functions in JavaScript ES6+, discussing concepts such as higher-order functions and closure. How functional programming makes working with data structures more straightforward; dives into advanced concepts, including partial application and recursion; and provides challenges that can help you test your understanding of key functional programming concepts.

#javascript #webdev #functional-programming #programming #developer 

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Learning Functional Programming with JavaScript
Sival Alethea

Sival Alethea

1624298400

Learn JavaScript - Full Course for Beginners. DO NOT MISS!!!

This complete 134-part JavaScript tutorial for beginners will teach you everything you need to know to get started with the JavaScript programming language.
⭐️Course Contents⭐️
0:00:00 Introduction
0:01:24 Running JavaScript
0:04:23 Comment Your Code
0:05:56 Declare Variables
0:06:15 Storing Values with the Assignment Operator
0:11:31 Initializing Variables with the Assignment Operator
0:11:58 Uninitialized Variables
0:12:40 Case Sensitivity in Variables
0:14:05 Add Two Numbers
0:14:34 Subtract One Number from Another
0:14:52 Multiply Two Numbers
0:15:12 Dividing Numbers
0:15:30 Increment
0:15:58 Decrement
0:16:22 Decimal Numbers
0:16:48 Multiply Two Decimals
0:17:18 Divide Decimals
0:17:33 Finding a Remainder
0:18:22 Augmented Addition
0:19:22 Augmented Subtraction
0:20:18 Augmented Multiplication
0:20:51 Augmented Division
0:21:19 Declare String Variables
0:22:01 Escaping Literal Quotes
0:23:44 Quoting Strings with Single Quotes
0:25:18 Escape Sequences
0:26:46 Plus Operator
0:27:49 Plus Equals Operator
0:29:01 Constructing Strings with Variables
0:30:14 Appending Variables to Strings
0:31:11 Length of a String
0:32:01 Bracket Notation
0:33:27 Understand String Immutability
0:34:23 Find the Nth Character
0:34:51 Find the Last Character
0:35:48 Find the Nth-to-Last Character
0:36:28 Word Blanks
0:40:44 Arrays
0:41:43 Nest Arrays
0:42:33 Access Array Data
0:43:34 Modify Array Data
0:44:48 Access Multi-Dimensional Arrays
0:46:30 push()
0:47:29 pop()
0:48:33 shift()
0:49:23 unshift()
0:50:36 Shopping List
0:51:41 Write Reusable with Functions
0:53:41 Arguments
0:55:43 Global Scope
0:59:31 Local Scope
1:00:46 Global vs Local Scope in Functions
1:02:40 Return a Value from a Function
1:03:55 Undefined Value returned
1:04:52 Assignment with a Returned Value
1:05:52 Stand in Line
1:08:41 Boolean Values
1:09:24 If Statements
1:11:51 Equality Operator
1:13:18 Strict Equality Operator
1:14:43 Comparing different values
1:15:38 Inequality Operator
1:16:20 Strict Inequality Operator
1:17:05 Greater Than Operator
1:17:39 Greater Than Or Equal To Operator
1:18:09 Less Than Operator
1:18:44 Less Than Or Equal To Operator
1:19:17 And Operator
1:20:41 Or Operator
1:21:37 Else Statements
1:22:27 Else If Statements
1:23:30 Logical Order in If Else Statements
1:24:45 Chaining If Else Statements
1:27:45 Golf Code
1:32:15 Switch Statements
1:35:46 Default Option in Switch Statements
1:37:23 Identical Options in Switch Statements
1:39:20 Replacing If Else Chains with Switch
1:41:11 Returning Boolean Values from Functions
1:42:20 Return Early Pattern for Functions
1:43:38 Counting Cards
1:49:11 Build Objects
1:50:46 Dot Notation
1:51:33 Bracket Notation
1:52:47 Variables
1:53:34 Updating Object Properties
1:54:30 Add New Properties to Object
1:55:19 Delete Properties from Object
1:55:54 Objects for Lookups
1:57:43 Testing Objects for Properties
1:59:15 Manipulating Complex Objects
2:01:00 Nested Objects
2:01:53 Nested Arrays
2:03:06 Record Collection
2:10:15 While Loops
2:11:35 For Loops
2:13:56 Odd Numbers With a For Loop
2:15:28 Count Backwards With a For Loop
2:17:08 Iterate Through an Array with a For Loop
2:19:43 Nesting For Loops
2:22:45 Do…While Loops
2:24:12 Profile Lookup
2:28:18 Random Fractions
2:28:54 Random Whole Numbers
2:30:21 Random Whole Numbers within a Range
2:31:46 parseInt Function
2:32:36 parseInt Function with a Radix
2:33:29 Ternary Operator
2:34:57 Multiple Ternary Operators
2:36:57 var vs let
2:39:02 var vs let scopes
2:41:32 const Keyword
2:43:40 Mutate an Array Declared with const
2:44:52 Prevent Object Mutation
2:47:17 Arrow Functions
2:28:24 Arrow Functions with Parameters
2:49:27 Higher Order Arrow Functions
2:53:04 Default Parameters
2:54:00 Rest Operator
2:55:31 Spread Operator
2:57:18 Destructuring Assignment: Objects
3:00:18 Destructuring Assignment: Nested Objects
3:01:55 Destructuring Assignment: Arrays
3:03:40 Destructuring Assignment with Rest Operator to Reassign Array
3:05:05 Destructuring Assignment to Pass an Object
3:06:39 Template Literals
3:10:43 Simple Fields
3:12:24 Declarative Functions
3:12:56 class Syntax
3:15:11 getters and setters
3:20:25 import vs require
3:22:33 export
3:23:40 * to Import
3:24:50 export default
3:25:26 Import a Default Export
📺 The video in this post was made by freeCodeCamp.org
The origin of the article: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PkZNo7MFNFg&list=PLWKjhJtqVAblfum5WiQblKPwIbqYXkDoC&index=4

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#javascript #learn javascript #learn javascript for beginners #learn javascript - full course for beginners #javascript programming language

Matteo  Renner

Matteo Renner

1617792300

The Most Important Programming Lesson I Ever Learned

In the fall of 2012, I walked into my graduate advisor’s office and asked her which computer science class she recommended for me to enroll in. I explained that I was a complete novice in programming. She suggested Introduction to C Programming.

After attending a few lectures, I discover that the majority of the students I spoke to in this introductorycourse had some prior experience in programming.

Six weeks and 80 hours of work later, I dropped the course.

Enter spring semester of 2013. I enrolled in an easier computer science course, Introduction to Computer Programming via the Web. I breezed through the first quarter of the course, executing HTML and CSS with ease. Then, we started Javascript (JS). That feeling of constant anxiety and stress from my previous computer science course returned in full fashion. It was too late in the semester to drop the course, so I asked a friend for help.

#debugging #learning-to-code #learning-to-program #computer-science-basics #how-to-start-learning-to-code #python-programming #learn-javascript #learn-python #web-monetization

Armando  Bruen

Armando Bruen

1596463015

Learning JavaScript: Data Types and Variables

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To paraphrase the title of an old computer science textbook, “Algorithms + Data = Programs.” The first step in learning a programming language such as JavaScript is to learn what types of data the language can work with. The second step is to learn how to store that data in variables. In this article I’ll discuss the different types of data you can work with in a JavaScript program and how to create and use variables to store and manipulate that data.

JavaScript Data Types

Unlike a compiled programming language, JavaScript does not require you to declare the data type of a variable. However, internally, JavaScript keeps track of the type of data being stored in a variable.

The three fundamental types of data (also known as primitives) you can use in a JavaScript program are:

number: numeric values such as 100 or 3.14159

string: Textual data, which can include numbers and symbols

boolean: true or false values

There are other primitive types (BigIntSymbol, and undefined) but they are not important for your beginning education in JavaScript. There are three other data types in JavaScript — objectnull, and function — but I will also save the discussion of these types for another time.

Literal Data

When data is encountered in a program, that data is said to be literal data. For example, if I write:

print(100);

The value 100 is called a number literal. If I write:

print("Hello, world!");

The phrase “Hello, world!” is a string literal. Literals are found throughout a program and I needed to describe what literal data is to distinguish it from a variable, which is just a name for a storage location in memory that can hold data.

Determining the Data Type of a Literal

You can see what the type of a literal is by calling a special function: typeof. This function returns the type of data passed into it. Here are some examples of calling the typeof function on some literal data:

typeof(100); // returns "number"
typeof("hello"); // returns "string"
typeof(false); // returns "boolean"

As you become more experienced in JavaScript programming, you will find the typeof function useful for avoiding all types of logic errors in your programs.

#learning-javascript #learn-to-program #javascript #javascript-tips #programming

Armando  Bruen

Armando Bruen

1597758757

Learning JavaScript: for Loops

In this article I’m going to cover the different forms of the for loop that are available in JavaScript. There is the general for loop, the for..in loop, and the for..of loop. I will describe how each loop works and when is the right time to use each loop type.

I am leaving out the Array.forEach loop as it is specialized for arrays and requires some knowledge of functions I haven’t covered yet.

The General for Loop

The first form of for loop I want to discuss is the general for loop that is standard in most programming languages. This loop is used in situations where you know in advance how many times you want the loop to iterate, as opposed to while loops, which should be used primarily when the number of iterations is unknown when the program is written, such as when you’re processing an unknown quantity of data or records in a file.

The syntax template for the general for loop is:

for (loop-variable-init; condition; loop-variable-modification) {

statement(s);

}

The loop variable is a variable that is initialized, tested, and then modified until it causes the condition to become false. Here is a simple example of a for loop that prints the numbers 1 through 10:

for (let i = 1; i <= 10; i++) {
  putstr(i + " ");
}

The output from this program is:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Let’s see how this loop works with an array:

let names = ["Terri", "Meredith", "Allison", "Mason"];
for (let i = 0; i < names.length; i++) {
  putstr(names[i] + " ");
}

This program outputs:

Terri Meredith Allison Mason

You can have more than one statement in the loop body. The following program accepts input from the user and displays the sum of the 5 numbers entered:

let total = 0;
let number = 0;
const numEntries = 5;
for (let i = 1; i <= numEntries; i++) {
  putstr("Enter a number: ");
  number = parseInt(readline());
  total += number;
}
print("The total is: " + total);

Here is the output from one run of this program:

Enter a number: 1
Enter a number: 2
Enter a number: 3
Enter a number: 4
Enter a number: 5
The total is: 15

#javascript #learning-javascript #learn-to-code #learn-to-program #programming-languages

Nat  Kutch

Nat Kutch

1596848280

From imperative to declarative JavaScript

Introduction

In this post, I will explain why declarative code is better than imperative code.

Then I will list some techniques to convert imperative JavaScript to a declarative one in common situations, defining key terms along the way.

Why declarative ?

First, let’s define what declarative and imperative mean.

Declarative code is one that highlights the intent of what it’s doing.

It favors the “what” over the “how”.

In other words, the exact implementations actually doing the work (aka the “how”) are hidden in order to convey what that work actually is (aka the “what”).

At the opposite, imperative code is one that favors the “how” over the “what”.

Let’s see an example:

The snippet below perform two things: it computes the square of x, then check if the result is even or not.

// imperative way

	const x = 5;

	const xSquared = x * x;

	let isEven;

	if (xSquared % 2 === 0) {
	  isEven = true;
	} else {
	  isEven = false;
	}
view raw
block1.js hosted with ❤ by GitHub

Here, we can see that we finally get isEven after several steps that we must follow in order.

These steps describe “how” we arrive to know if the square of x is even, but that’s not obvious.

If you take a non-programmer and show him this, he might have a hard time deciphering it.

Now let’s see another snippet where I introduce a magic isSquareEven function that performs the two same things than the previous one.

#functional-programming #javascript #javascript-tips #programming #declarative-programming #function