Lina  Biyinzika

Lina Biyinzika

1624970880

Reptile: OpenAI’s Latest Meta-Learning Algorithm

As more data, better algorithms, and higher computing power continue to shape the future of artificial intelligence (AI), reliable machine learning models have become paramount to optimise outcomes. OpenAI’s meta-learning algorithm, Reptile, is one such model designed to perform a wide array of tasks.

For those unaware, meta-learning refers to the idea of ‘learning to learn by solving multiple tasks, like how humans learn. Using meta-learning, you can design models that can learn new skills or adapt to new environments rapidly with a few training examples.

In the recent past, the meta-learning algorithm has had a fair bit of success as it can learn with limited quantities of data. Unlike other learning models like reinforcement learning, which uses reward mechanisms for each action, meta-learning can generalise to different scenarios by separating a specified task into two functions.

The first function often gives a quick response within a specific task, while the second function includes the extraction of information learned from previous tasks. It is similar to how humans behave, where they often gain knowledge from previous unrelated tasks or experiences.

Typically, there are three common approaches to meta-learning.

  1. Metric-based: Learn an efficient distance metric
  2. Model-based: Use (recurrent) network with external or internal memory
  3. Optimisation-based: Optimise the model parameters explicitly for fast learning

For instance, the above image depicts the model-agnostic meta-learning algorithm (MAML) developed by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, in partnership with OpenAI. The MAML optimises for a representation θ that can quickly adapt to new tasks.

On the other hand, Reptile utilises a stochastic gradient descent (SGD) to initialise the model’s parameters instead of performing several computations that are often resource-consuming. In other words, it also reduces the dependency of higher computational hardware requirements, if implemented in a machine learning project.

#developers corner #how reptile works #meta learning algorithm #meta-learning algorithm #algorithm

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Reptile: OpenAI’s Latest Meta-Learning Algorithm
Lina  Biyinzika

Lina Biyinzika

1624970880

Reptile: OpenAI’s Latest Meta-Learning Algorithm

As more data, better algorithms, and higher computing power continue to shape the future of artificial intelligence (AI), reliable machine learning models have become paramount to optimise outcomes. OpenAI’s meta-learning algorithm, Reptile, is one such model designed to perform a wide array of tasks.

For those unaware, meta-learning refers to the idea of ‘learning to learn by solving multiple tasks, like how humans learn. Using meta-learning, you can design models that can learn new skills or adapt to new environments rapidly with a few training examples.

In the recent past, the meta-learning algorithm has had a fair bit of success as it can learn with limited quantities of data. Unlike other learning models like reinforcement learning, which uses reward mechanisms for each action, meta-learning can generalise to different scenarios by separating a specified task into two functions.

The first function often gives a quick response within a specific task, while the second function includes the extraction of information learned from previous tasks. It is similar to how humans behave, where they often gain knowledge from previous unrelated tasks or experiences.

Typically, there are three common approaches to meta-learning.

  1. Metric-based: Learn an efficient distance metric
  2. Model-based: Use (recurrent) network with external or internal memory
  3. Optimisation-based: Optimise the model parameters explicitly for fast learning

For instance, the above image depicts the model-agnostic meta-learning algorithm (MAML) developed by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, in partnership with OpenAI. The MAML optimises for a representation θ that can quickly adapt to new tasks.

On the other hand, Reptile utilises a stochastic gradient descent (SGD) to initialise the model’s parameters instead of performing several computations that are often resource-consuming. In other words, it also reduces the dependency of higher computational hardware requirements, if implemented in a machine learning project.

#developers corner #how reptile works #meta learning algorithm #meta-learning algorithm #algorithm

Michael  Hamill

Michael Hamill

1617349920

Workshop Alert! Hands-on Meta-Learning

The Association of Data Scientists (AdaSci), the premier global professional body of data science and ML practitioners, has announced a hands-on workshop on meta-learning on March 13, Saturday.

The unavailability of large datasets has turned out to be a huge problem in solving critical challenges with machine learning and artificial intelligence. As a matter of fact, deep learning’s progress often gets impeded due to the unavailability of adequate labelled data.

In many cases, it becomes challenging to collect a sufficiently large number of labelled data, which inspired many research efforts on exploring ways to train robust models for various learning tasks beyond labelled data. Further, to train complex deep learning algorithms and models need high computational power.

In this workshop, the attendees get to learn about meta-learning — a subfield of machine learning where deep learning models are trained with fewer data efficiently. Known as ‘learning how to learn,’ meta-learning is an exciting trend in machine learning.

#featured #meta-learning applications #meta-learning workshop #meta-learning-algorithms #workshop on meta-learning

Reptile: OpenAI’s Latest Meta-Learning Algorithm

As more data, better algorithms, and higher computing power continue to shape the future of artificial intelligence (AI), reliable machine learning models have become paramount to optimise outcomes. OpenAI’s meta-learning algorithm, Reptile, is one such model designed to perform a wide array of tasks.

Read more: https://analyticsindiamag.com/reptile-openais-latest-meta-learning-algorithm/

#ai #openai #data #algorithm

Mckenzie  Osiki

Mckenzie Osiki

1622134500

Inside MoveNet, Google’s Latest Pose Detection Model

Ahead of Google I/O, Google Research launched a new pose detection model in TensorFlow.js called MoveNet. This ultra-fast and accurate model can detect 17 key points in the human body. MoveNet is currently available on TF Hub with two variants — Lightning and Thunder.

While Lightning is intended for latency-critical applications, Thunder is for applications that call for higher accuracy. Both models claim to run faster than real-time (30+ frames per second (FPS)) on most personal computers, laptops and phones.

The model can be launched in the browser using TensorFlow.js architecture with no server calls needed after the initial page load or external packages. The live demo version is available here.

Currently, the MoveNet model works for the individual in the camera field-of-view. But, soon, Google Research looks to extend the MoveNet model to the multi-person domain so that developers can support applications with multiple people.

#developers corner #body movements online #body movements virtual #fitness machine learning #google i/o #google latest #google new development #google research latest #machine learning models body poses #ose detection model #remote healthcare solutions #tensorflow latest model #track body movements #wellness machine learning

Tia  Gottlieb

Tia Gottlieb

1598250000

Paper Summary: Discovering Reinforcement Learning Agents

Introduction

Although the field of deep learning is evolving extremely fast, unique research with the potential to get us closer to Artificial General Intelligence (AGI) is rare and hard to find. One exception to this rule can be found in the field of meta-learning. Recently, meta-learning has also been applied to Reinforcement Learning (RL) with some success. The paper “Discovering Reinforcement Learning Agents” by Oh et al. from DeepMind provides a new and refreshing look at the application of meta-learning to RL.

**Traditionally, RL relied on hand-crafted algorithms **such as Temporal Difference learning (TD-learning) and Monte Carlo learning, various Policy Gradient methods, or combinations thereof such as Actor-Critic models. These RL algorithms are usually finely adjusted to train models for a very specific task such as playing Go or Dota. One reason for this is that multiple hyperparameters such as the discount factor γ and the bootstrapping parameter λ need to be tuned for stable training. Furthermore, the very update rules as well as the choice of predictors such as value functions need to be chosen diligently to ensure good performance of the model. The entire process has to be performed manually and is often tedious and time-consuming.

DeepMind is trying to change this with their latest publication. In the paper, the authors propose a new meta-learning approach that discovers the learning objective as well as the exploration procedure by interacting with a set of simple environments. They call the approach the Learned Policy Gradient (LPG). The most appealing result of the paper is that the algorithm is able to effectively generalize to more complex environments, suggesting the potential to discover novel RL frameworks purely by interaction.

In this post, I will try to explain the paper in detail and provide additional explanation where I had problems with understanding. Hereby, I will stay close to the structure of the paper in order to allow you to find the relevant parts in the original text if you want to get additional details. Let’s dive in!

#meta-learning #reinforcement-learning #machine-learning #ai #deep-learning #deep learning