Comparison of GitLab and GitHub

Hello, my name is Ivan Gromakovskii, I am a software developer at Serokell. I’ve been working on several relatively big projects during the last few years where I was one of the main contributors at the project. Those projects include:

Two of them are hosted on GitHub and one is hosted on GitLab. I’ve been working on some other projects hosted on these platforms as well. These two platforms are among the most popular ones for Git repositories, and in this article, I want to compare them based on my experience. It should help people who are choosing between GitLab and GitHub for their new project or who consider switching from one platform to another. In general, all people who use GitLab or GitHub may discover some new features here.

Disclaimer: both GitHub and GitLab are actively developed and new features appear there from time to time. If some feature is present in only one platform, there are high chances it will be added to the other one at some point. So this comparison will inevitably become somewhat outdated sooner or later.

Our workflow

Let me briefly describe the way we write code and work with Git.

  • We have the main integration branch which is protected so that all code gets there via Pull Requests (PRs). Note: in GitLab, they are called Merge Requests (MR), I will be using “PR” for the rest of the article which means “MR” in the case of GitLab.
  • Usually we have CI which at least checks that code compiles and tests pass. It may perform other checks as well (e. g. correctness of links in the documentation).
  • Apart from that, all PRs must be reviewed by other developers.
  • A pull request can be merged only if all CI checks pass in the corresponding branch and if it is approved by a certain number of people (minimal number of approvals is usually 1 or 2).
  • We usually do not use the built-in issue tracker from GitLab or GitHub because we use a more advanced issue tracker. Some repositories do use it though. We also do not use features such as wiki.

Therefore, we are primarily interested in two things:

  • Browsing a repository. Even though it all can be done from one’s editor, terminal, file manager and so on, sometimes one may want to do it from browser for various reasons.
  • Pull requests: creation, code review, making and tracking changes, CI.

#github #gitlab #comparison

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Comparison of GitLab and GitHub

Comparison of GitLab and GitHub

Hello, my name is Ivan Gromakovskii, I am a software developer at Serokell. I’ve been working on several relatively big projects during the last few years where I was one of the main contributors at the project. Those projects include:

Two of them are hosted on GitHub and one is hosted on GitLab. I’ve been working on some other projects hosted on these platforms as well. These two platforms are among the most popular ones for Git repositories, and in this article, I want to compare them based on my experience. It should help people who are choosing between GitLab and GitHub for their new project or who consider switching from one platform to another. In general, all people who use GitLab or GitHub may discover some new features here.

Disclaimer: both GitHub and GitLab are actively developed and new features appear there from time to time. If some feature is present in only one platform, there are high chances it will be added to the other one at some point. So this comparison will inevitably become somewhat outdated sooner or later.

Our workflow

Let me briefly describe the way we write code and work with Git.

  • We have the main integration branch which is protected so that all code gets there via Pull Requests (PRs). Note: in GitLab, they are called Merge Requests (MR), I will be using “PR” for the rest of the article which means “MR” in the case of GitLab.
  • Usually we have CI which at least checks that code compiles and tests pass. It may perform other checks as well (e. g. correctness of links in the documentation).
  • Apart from that, all PRs must be reviewed by other developers.
  • A pull request can be merged only if all CI checks pass in the corresponding branch and if it is approved by a certain number of people (minimal number of approvals is usually 1 or 2).
  • We usually do not use the built-in issue tracker from GitLab or GitHub because we use a more advanced issue tracker. Some repositories do use it though. We also do not use features such as wiki.

Therefore, we are primarily interested in two things:

  • Browsing a repository. Even though it all can be done from one’s editor, terminal, file manager and so on, sometimes one may want to do it from browser for various reasons.
  • Pull requests: creation, code review, making and tracking changes, CI.

#github #gitlab #comparison

Edison  Stark

Edison Stark

1603861600

How to Compare Multiple GitHub Projects with Our GitHub Stats tool

If you have project code hosted on GitHub, chances are you might be interested in checking some numbers and stats such as stars, commits and pull requests.

You might also want to compare some similar projects in terms of the above mentioned stats, for whatever reasons that interest you.

We have the right tool for you: the simple and easy-to-use little tool called GitHub Stats.

Let’s dive right in to what we can get out of it.

Getting started

This interactive tool is really easy to use. Follow the three steps below and you’ll get what you want in real-time:

1. Head to the GitHub repo of the tool

2. Enter as many projects as you need to check on

3. Hit the Update button beside each metric

In this article we are going to compare three most popular machine learning projects for you.

#github #tools #github-statistics-react #github-stats-tool #compare-github-projects #github-projects #software-development #programming

Alverta  Hammes

Alverta Hammes

1626227280

GITHUB VS GITLAB COMPARISON

GitHub vs GitLab - how are they different?
▶ Contact Jelvix: hello@jelvix.com | jelvix.com

We are a technology consulting and software development company eager to share our knowledge and experience.
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▶ LINKS:

▶ TIME CODES:
00:00 Intro
00:32 What is Git?
01:10 What is GitHub?
01:28 What is GitLab?
01:46 Features of GitHub and GitLab
02:45 Interfaces
03:40 Popularity and growth
04:18 Summary of our comparison
04:39 Contact Jelvix

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▶ About this video:
Software development projects are based on teamwork. All members should freely access code written by their colleagues. It is possible with services such as Github and Gitlab that allow documenting changes in code and uploading new versions.

Both these systems rely on Git.
In a nutshell, Git is a system that stores code, tracks its changes in real-time, and synchronizes updates on local and Cloud repositories. It’s not a particular service, rather, a technology. If we take Git and GitHub, for example, GitHub is a service that uses Git – but other services can use Git as well.

#github #gitlab

Jolie  Reichert

Jolie Reichert

1595668020

Stay Safe on GitHub: Security Practices to Follow

GitHub is undoubtedly the largest and most popular social development platform in the world. According to its 2019 State of the Octoverse Report, GitHub is home to over 40 million, and the community keeps expanding every day.

As developers in this deeply interconnected community use open source code to build software, Github security should be a top priority. This is because extensive code re-use increases the risk of distributing vulnerabilities from one dependency or repository to another. As such, every contributor should focus on creating a secure development environment.

Here are eight security practices that GitHub users can follow to stay safe and protect their code:

Strengthen Access Controls

Implementing proper access control is one of the best practices for enhancing security, not only on GitHub but in every other environment where code security is imperative.

GitHub offers several options that users can employ to reduce the risk of improper exposure. But to start with, it is important to employ the least privilege model where users are only granted necessary permissions.

Here are some basic access control guidelines that you should follow:

  • Restrict the creation of repositories to prevent users from exposing organization information in public repositories.
  • Enable branch protection and status checks to ensure users can merge commits or manipulate branches safely.
  • Allow or disallow forking private repositories to ensure users do not expose or share organizational code with unauthorized parties.
  • Revoke access for all inactive users who are no longer part of the contributors.

#tutorial #github #access control #software security #repository management #github issues #source code analysis #github apps #github enterprise #git best practices

Jolie  Reichert

Jolie Reichert

1596161100

Stay Safe on GitHub: Security Practices to Follow

GitHub is undoubtedly the largest and most popular social development platform in the world. According to its 2019 State of the Octoverse Report, GitHub is home to over 40 million, and the community keeps expanding every day.

As developers in this deeply interconnected community use open source code to build software, Github security should be a top priority. This is because extensive code re-use increases the risk of distributing vulnerabilities from one dependency or repository to another. As such, every contributor should focus on creating a secure development environment.

Here are eight security practices that GitHub users can follow to stay safe and protect their code:

Strengthen Access Controls

Implementing proper access control is one of the best practices for enhancing security, not only on GitHub but in every other environment where code security is imperative.

GitHub offers several options that users can employ to reduce the risk of improper exposure. But to start with, it is important to employ the least privilege model where users are only granted necessary permissions.

Here are some basic access control guidelines that you should follow:

  • Restrict the creation of repositories to prevent users from exposing organization information in public repositories.
  • Enable branch protection and status checks to ensure users can merge commits or manipulate branches safely.
  • Allow or disallow forking private repositories to ensure users do not expose or share organizational code with unauthorized parties.
  • Revoke access for all inactive users who are no longer part of the contributors.
  • Review access rights to your GitHub projects periodically.
  • Ensure users do not share GitHub accounts or passwords.
  • Ensure every contributor uses two-factor authentication on their account.
  • Rotate personal access tokens and SSH keys

#tutorial #github #access control #software security #repository management #github issues #source code analysis #github apps #github enterprise #git best practices